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Book

Birmingham Citizen Advocacy: and evaluation of a pilot citizen advocacy scheme for people with mental illness

Authors:
FAULKNER Alison, RITCHIE Jane
Publisher:
Social and Community Planning Research
Publication year:
1989
Pagination:
51p.
Place of publication:
London
Journal article

Planned provision blues

Author:
FAULKNER Alison
Journal article citation:
Community Care, 22.10.92, 1992, pp.20-21.
Publisher:
Reed Business Information

Services for people with mental health problems face particular difficulties in the struggle to get community care right. Presents the result of a national survey which was carried out by Research and Development in Psychiatry.

Book

Who is providing what: information about UK residential care provision for people with mental health problems

Authors:
FAULKNER Alison, FIELD Vida, LINDESAY James
Publisher:
Research and Development for Psychiatry
Publication year:
1992
Pagination:
23p.,tables,bibliog.
Place of publication:
London

Research study assessing the current status and composition of residential provision for people with mental health problems, and establishing a baseline picture of provision prior to the implementation of the NHS and Community Care Act 1990.

Journal article

Strategies for living

Author:
FAULKNER Alison
Journal article citation:
A Life in the Day, 4(2), May 2000, pp.16-17.
Publisher:
Emerald

In March 2000 the Mental Health Foundation launched a groundbreaking report based on a three-year investigation on the ways in which people with mental health problems manage their own mental illness. This article introduces and discusses the key findings and recommendations.

Book Full text available online for free

Randomised controlled trials: the straightjacket of mental health research

Author:
FAULKNER Alison
Publisher:
McPin Foundation
Publication year:
2015
Pagination:
19
Place of publication:
London

This paper challenges the current domination of randomised controlled trials (RCTs) and systematic reviews of RCTs in mental health research and evidence-based healthcare, suggesting that we need to populate the landscape with alternative sources of knowledge and evidence from a survivor researcher perspective. Of greatest concern is that the uncritical reification of the RCT marginalises the knowledge or evidence produced by mental health service users and survivors. The report contends that survivor research (user-controlled research) has a major contribution to make to the knowledge base about mental health and to the debate about what constitutes acceptable evidence in mental health care and argues that the existing research structures and the evidence hierarchy, in which RCTs are held to be the 'gold standard', are preventing this contribution from being realised. (Edited publisher abstract)

Journal article

A helping hand: taking peer support into the 21st century

Authors:
FAULKNER Alison, BASSET Thurstine
Journal article citation:
Mental Health and Social Inclusion, 16(1), 2012, pp.41-47.
Publisher:
Emerald

Peer support or mutual support has a long history in mental health. Recent developments mean that peer support, which originated informally through participation in service user groups, has become incorporated into statutory services through the use of employed intentional support roles. The purpose of this paper is to explore service user perspectives on peer support, particularly looking at the benefits and pitfalls of these developments. The paper is informed by a literature review, and by a series of consultations with 5 service user and peer support groups. The findings suggest that there are many benefits to service users from engaging in peer support, including: shared identity; development and sharing of skills; increased confidence; improved mental health and wellbeing; and the potential for challenging stigma and discrimination. Most of the challenges were associated with intentional support, including: role conflict; setting boundaries; and ensuring adequate training and support. A key theme that divided opinion was the degree to which peer support should be ‘professionalised’ as part of statutory services. The findings suggest that it is vital to acknowledge the different views about payment, equality and professionalisation arising in different service user and voluntary sector groups. The paper concludes that peer support arose from people wanting to create their own support networks, and that any plans to formalise it needs to acknowledge that pre-existing grassroots expertise.

Book Full text available online for free

User involvement in forensic mental health research and development

Authors:
FAULKNER Alison, MORRIS Brigid
Publisher:
NHS National Programme on Forensic Mental Health Research and Development
Publication year:
2002
Pagination:
42p.,bibliog.
Place of publication:
Liverpool

Service users are increasingly undertaking research themselves and/or campaigning for greater involvement in research. Some organisations are also undertaking user controlled research where decisions made at the different stages of the research process are in the control of service users themselves and are not just influenced by them. Several units or departments dedicated to user involvement in research have become established in the last few years, and other organisations have established programmes of work dedicated to 'user-led' research (which recognises and supports the potential of service users to undertake their own research). For some time now, the National Programme on Forensic Mental Health R&D has engaged users of mental health services on its Advisory Committee. In April 2002, it invited expressions of interest from people with a track record of research into user involvement, or organisations of service users, to produce an expert paper on user involvement in forensic mental health research. This paper is the result of that process. (Edited publisher abstract)

Journal article

Learning about service user involvement in mental health research

Authors:
TELFORD Rosemary, FAULKNER Alison
Journal article citation:
Journal of Mental Health, 13(6), December 2004, pp.549-559.
Publisher:
Informa Healthcare
Place of publication:
London

Service user involvement in mental health research is a relatively new concept for health professionals. The aims of this paper were to investigate: how far service user involvement in mental health research appears to have been understood, how far it is happening, reasons why service users get involved in research, and barriers to closer involvement from both service user and researcher perspectives. The literature was examined to explore the extent of service user involvement in mental health research, and ways in which service users are carrying out research. It was concluded that while there is little empirical research in this area, increasingly service user involvement in mental health research can be found in the peer-reviewed domain, and at all levels of the research process. The alternative literature (including what is commonly called the grey literature) offers a rich source to learn from. Consideration of the barriers to closer service user involvement highlights likely challenges to traditional researcher-led ideologies and processes.

Journal article

A friend in need

Authors:
WRIGHT Sarah, FAULKNER Alison, BIRD Lisa
Journal article citation:
Openmind, 109, May 2001, pp.14-15.
Publisher:
MIND

Explains how stigma and discrimination about mental health problems can intrude on relationships between users and those closest to them.

Book

Suicide and self-harm

Authors:
BIRD Lisa, FAULKNER Alison
Publisher:
Mental Health Foundation
Publication year:
2000
Pagination:
30p.,list of orgs.,bibliog.
Place of publication:
London

Discusses incidence of, and risk factors for, suicide and self harm.

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