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Implementing what works: the impact of individual placement and support regional trainer: briefing

Author:
CENTRE FOR MENTAL HEALTH
Publisher:
Centre for Mental Health
Publication year:
2012
Pagination:
12p.
Place of publication:
London

Individual Placement and Support (IPS) is now internationally recognised as the most effective and efficient way of supporting people who experience a mental illness into competitive employment. This briefing paper reports on the results of a pilot project to speed up the implementation of IPS across mental health services in Sussex through the creation of a ‘regional trainer’ role. The role was based on the State Trainer model that was developed and is widely used in the United States.  A ‘regional trainer’ was employed for a year in Sussex to ensure fidelity to the IPS model in mental health and employment services. During the 12 months of the pilot the number of people using the trust's mental health services who obtained paid work through the IPS service more than doubled the target of 125, with 286 people finding paid employment. Key to the success of the regional trainer was their ability to encourage cultural change, which accepts employment as part of an individual’s recovery, and the use of regular ‘fidelity reviews’ to determine how well the principles of IPS are being applied in practice and to make recommendations for improved outcomes. The findings indicate that wider use of the regional trainer role could help mental health and employment services across the UK to support more people into paid work.

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Supporting people with mental health conditions into paid employment: a briefing for work programme providers

Author:
CENTRE FOR MENTAL HEALTH
Publisher:
Centre for Mental Health
Publication year:
2010
Pagination:
2p.
Place of publication:
London

A briefing paper providing advice for contractors of Work Programme services on helping people with long-term mental health conditions into employment. The paper explains the benefits of the Individual Placement and Support (IPS) approach to supported employment over the traditional 'train then place' model. It outlines the seven basic principles if IPS, presents some of the research evidence that supports its use over other methods, and explains how it can be used with other client groups. The briefing paper also includes ten questions to consider asking of specialist providers of employment support for people with mental health conditions.

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The economic and social costs of mental health problems in 2009/10

Author:
CENTRE FOR MENTAL HEALTH
Publisher:
Centre for Mental Health
Publication year:
2010
Pagination:
4p.
Place of publication:
London

A policy paper published in 2003 estimated that the economic and social costs of mental health problems in England in the financial year 2002/03 amounted to £77.4 billion. Using the same methodology, a straightforward updating of this figure suggests that the aggregate cost of mental health problems in England increased to £105.2 billion in 2009/10. This updated analysis shows that mental ill health should continue to be a priority issue for public policy. The cost of mental ill health continues to fall mainly upon those who experience it and their families but it also creates a high cost for taxpayers and for business. This report suggests that effective responses to people with mental health difficulties are value for public money. Providing good quality parenting support to people with young children, extending access to psychological therapy, early identification of distress at work, diverting offenders with mental health difficulties from custody and assisting people with severe mental health problems into paid work all make a difference to people’s lives and create both immediate and long-term savings to public finances.

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Supporting carers: mental health carers' assessments in policy and practice

Author:
CENTRE FOR MENTAL HEALTH
Publisher:
Centre for Mental Health
Publication year:
2016
Pagination:
12
Place of publication:
London

Briefing paper which provides a summary of the policy and legislation relating to mental health carers’ assessments in England, one of the key features of the Care Act 2014. It looks at carers’ right to assessment; and the carers’ role in the Triangle of Care. It also draws on exploratory research which interviewed individuals from NHS trusts, local authorities, and carers themselves to see how carers’ assessment worked in practice. It reports that mental health carers may face significant challenges to accessing carers’ assessments and the support that may follow. This is because many people do not identify themselves as ‘carers’; data protection laws can limit information sharing; there may be limits to the support that is available to a carer once the assessment has taken place, and differences between local areas in the quality of carers’ support. A good practice example from South Essex Partnership University NHS Foundation Trust is included to show an example of innovative support. The briefing recommends the need for further research to highlight the current barriers to effective implementation of the Care Act and to champion the need for carers to be adequately supported by statutory bodies. (Edited publisher abstract)

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Ten questions for your council

Author:
CENTRE FOR MENTAL HEALTH
Publisher:
Centre for Mental Health
Publication year:
2013
Pagination:
2
Place of publication:
London

The Joint Strategic Needs Assessment (JSNA) provides a description of the health and wellbeing status of the local population and informs the local Health and Wellbeing Board’s strategy and commissioning priorities for health, public health and social care. However, there is huge variation in how well mental health is covered in JSNAs. This briefing provides ten questions to ensure that relevant mental health information is included in the JSNA to promote good mental health and to prevent and treat mental health conditions. (Edited publisher abstract)

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Barriers to employment: what works for people with mental health problems

Author:
CENTRE FOR MENTAL HEALTH
Publisher:
Centre for Mental Health
Publication year:
2013
Pagination:
16
Place of publication:
London

This briefing identifies where the main barriers to employment still lie, what we know about which interventions work (and should be provided more widely), and where there are gaps in evidence-based interventions and what might be tested to develop that evidence. The briefing describes supports which are currently available for people wanting to work, and calls for a more widespread implementation of best practice. One such instance is Individual Placement and Support (IPS), an approach to helping people with severe mental illness to get back into employment; but although Its evidence base is well-established, its availability across the UK is patchy..Using personal budgets is suggested as an option for funding IPS. The briefing comments on the effects of policies such as universal credit (UC), and the work capability assessment (WCA): these do little to tackle inequalities in employment rates for those with mental health problems or other disabilities. The briefing urges commissioners and providers of both employment services and health and social care to make support into employment a priority: employers also need support to be able to help existing employees who develop mental health problems. . (Edited publisher abstract)

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The mental health strategy, system reforms and spending pressures: what do we know so far?

Authors:
CENTRE FOR MENTAL HEALTH, et al
Publisher:
Centre for Mental Health
Publication year:
2012
Pagination:
5p.
Place of publication:
London

The Government’s 2011 mental health strategy, ‘No Health Without Mental Health’, set out a vision for both improved mental health for all and better support for people with mental health problems. The aim of this study was to evaluate the delivery of this strategy. A brief questionnaire was sent to 24 national organisations to identify key themes from intelligence they had received to date from their members. This was followed up by either a face-to-face or phone interview with the 17 organisations that responded. The interview focussed on how delivery of the strategy was being influenced by pressures on public spending and the emerging reforms in health local government and other public services. This research paper summarises the main findings of that process and the implications of these findings for mental health policy and practice in England. The findings suggest that the strategy’s practical impact on service commissioning and provision has been limited; knowledge of the strategy among commissioners in particular is variable and there is little evidence that it is being used as a guide to local decision making.

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A place to live: securing stable accommodation for offenders with mental health problems

Author:
CENTRE FOR MENTAL HEALTH
Publisher:
Centre for Mental Health
Publication year:
2011
Pagination:
18p.
Place of publication:
London

Ensuring that offenders with mental health problems have a safe and stable home is a key part of their recovery and rehabilitation. Noting the current changing policy context and public spending pressures, this briefing paper examines and discusses homelessness, mental health and offending. It covers stable accommodation and mental health, stable accommodation and offending, pathways into stable accommodation, the role of local authorities, the voluntary sector, the supporting people programme, the criminal justice system, ex-service personnel, housing support for people with multiple needs, welfare reform, the localism agenda, the homelessness duty, spending pressures, cross government working, and outcomes and recovery. It concludes that instability in housing appears to be linked to both poor mental health and offending, that offenders with mental health problems can become trapped in a cycle of offending and homelessness, and that timely access to appropriate housing support could be an important factor in breaking this cycle. It makes recommendations about how people particularly vulnerable to homelessness could be better supported in order to improve outcomes for individuals and their community.

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Mental health care and the criminal justice system

Author:
CENTRE FOR MENTAL HEALTH
Publisher:
Centre for Mental Health
Publication year:
2011
Pagination:
10p., bibliog.
Place of publication:
London
Edition:
Rev ed.

England and Wales together have one of the highest rates of imprisonment in Western Europe, and responsibility for prison health care lies with the NHS. It aims to give prisoners access to the same quality and range of health services as the general public receives in the community. This is an enormous challenge. Many prisoners have a combination of mental health problems, substance misuse and personality disorder, as well as a range of other issues to deal with. But the costs, both financial and social, of containing people in prison without access to appropriate health care are high. This briefing paper examines the provision of mental health care for adults in the criminal justice system. It looks at what has been achieved to date and identifies priorities for further work.

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Preventing prison suicide: perspectives from the inside

Authors:
HOWARD LEAGUE FOR PENAL REFORM, CENTRE FOR MENTAL HEALTH
Publisher:
Howard League for Penal Reform
Publication year:
2016
Pagination:
8
Place of publication:
London

Focuses on the views and lived experience of those with current or past experience of prison, examining what contributes to vulnerability and risk of suicide. In 2014 there was a marked increase in suicides in English and Welsh prisons, when 89 prisoners took their own lives. This was the highest number of suicides since 2007. In 2015 another 89 prisoners took their own lives. The number of suicides in prisons has remained high for two years, and by the end of March 2016 there had already been 27 self-inflicted deaths in prisons. The report highlights that staff shortages have increased the risk of suicide and that relationships between staff and prisoners are key as prisoners need to feel supported, cared for and able to confide in and trust staff. Drawing on findings from focus groups with both current and former prisoners, the briefing reports that prisoners described a culture where, on the whole, distress was not believed or responded to with compassion. In particular, arrival, being released and transferred were all cited as times when prisoners felt most vulnerable. Staff inexperience and lack of training around mental health were seen as a significant factor in increasing risk while mental health services in prison were mainly seen by prisoners as providers of medication. Conversely, wellbeing groups, the chaplaincy and imams, peer mentor schemes and listening schemes were perceived as helpful. The briefing argues that change needs to happen across the system to recognise the influence of the prison environment on people’s vulnerability. Prisons should be enabling environments, striving to be a psychologically informed environment with an emphasis on the quality of relationships. (Edited publisher abstract)

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