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Monitoring the use of the Mental Health Act in 2009/10: the Care Quality Commission's first report on the exercise of its functions in keeping under review the operation of the Mental Health Act 1983

Author:
CARE QUALITY COMMISSION
Publisher:
Care Quality Commission
Publication year:
2010
Pagination:
118p.

The Mental Health Act requires CQC to report annually to Parliament on the work in monitoring the use of the Act in England. This report covers CQC’s first year of monitoring the use of the Act, from 1 April 2009 to 31 March 2010. It is based on findings from the visits that our Mental Health Act Commissioners and SOADs have made to services during the year. Key findings reveal that, in the last decade, there has been a steady decline in the number of people treated as inpatients in mental health hospitals. However, the proportion of people being treated in hospital as detained patients, rather than as informal patients, is growing. There has been a marked reduction in the number of notifications we received for young people admitted to adult psychiatric wards under the Act, especially those under 16 years of age. This suggests that mental health services are making progress with implementing national policy and legislative changes.

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A safer place to be: findings from our survey of health-based places of safety for people detained under section 136 of the Mental Health Act

Author:
CARE QUALITY COMMISSION
Publisher:
Care Quality Commission
Publication year:
2014
Pagination:
60
Place of publication:
Newcastle upon Tyne

Examines the provision and use of health-based places of safety for people detained under section 136 of the Mental Health Act, which gives police officers the power to detain people, believed to have a mental disorder, in a public place and to take them to a place of safety for assessment. The report, based on the findings from a survey of NHS mental health trusts and social enterprise providers of health-based places of safety in England, focuses on: the availability, in practice, of health-based places of safety; accessibility, including any exclusion criteria; staffing and training of those involved in operating places of safety; target times and delays in carrying out MHA assessments after people have been taken to places of safety; governance, reporting and multi-agency working; and the role of police and ambulance services. The report highlights four key findings that need to be urgently addressed: too many places of safety are turning people away or requiring people to wait for long periods with the police, because they are already full or because there are staffing problems; too many providers operate policies that exclude young people, people who are intoxicated, and people with disturbed behaviour from all of their places of safety; too many commissioners are not adequately fulfilling their responsibilities for maintaining an oversight of the section 136 pathway; and too many providers are not appropriately monitoring their own service provision. As a result and despite guidance from the MHA Code of Practice and elsewhere, the use of police stations across the country is far from uncommon. (Edited publisher abstract)

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Patients' experiences of the First-Tier Tribunal (Mental Health): report of a joint pilot project of the Administrative Justice and Tribunals Council and the Care Quality Commission

Authors:
ADMINISTRATIVE JUSTICE AND TRIBUNALS COUNCIL, CARE QUALITY COMMISSION
Publisher:
Administrative Justice and Tribunals Council; Care Quality Commission
Publication year:
2011
Pagination:
35p.
Place of publication:
London

Each year, there are more than 45,000 detentions of men and women in hospital for assessment and treatment for mental disorder under the Mental Health Act 1983. At any point in time, around 16,000 people are being detained by NHS and independent hospitals and a further 4,000 people are on community treatment orders (CTOs) or are subject to guardianship powers. The First-tier Tribunal (Mental Health) is the primary mechanism in England for appeal against the use of the Act's powers of detention, guardianship or supervised community treatment. It is an independent judicial body administered by the Tribunals Service and provides one of the key safeguards under the Act. This report details the experiences of a joint pilot project of the Administrative Justice and Tribunals Council and the Care Quality Commission to obtain information from people who use mental health services and patients detained under the Mental Health Act about their experiences of coming before the First-tier Tribunal (Mental Health). Patients had wide-ranging experiences of the tribunal, ranging from positive to strongly negative. When examined as a whole, one trend emerged: the patients who received the outcome they wanted gave far more positive answers about the tribunal process in general, while disappointed patients made more negative comments.

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Survey of community mental health services 2011: full national results tables

Author:
CARE QUALITY COMMISSION
Publisher:
Care Quality Commission
Publication year:
2011
Pagination:
30p.
Place of publication:
London

National results of a survey which looked at the experiences of people receiving community mental health services during the time period July to September 2011. The survey involved 65 NHS Trusts in England and responses were received from over 17,000 services users (33% response rate). The survey included questions on care and treatment, contact with health and social care workers, medication, talking therapies, care coordinators, care plans and reviews, crisis care, and day to day living. Most people said that they were listened to carefully, treated with respect and dignity. The results also found that people needed to be more involved in some aspects of the provision of their care. Comparisons between 2011 and 2010 data are included where possible.

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Monitoring the use of the Mental Health Act in 2009/10: an overview of CQC's findings and recommendations from our first annual report on our monitoring of how the Act is used

Author:
CARE QUALITY COMMISSION
Publisher:
Care Quality Commission
Publication year:
2010
Pagination:
24p.
Place of publication:
London

The Mental Health Act requires the Care Quality Commission (CQC) to report annually to Parliament on the work in monitoring the use of the Act in England. This publication is an overview of the findings and recommendations in the report of the first year of monitoring the use of the Act, from 1 April 2009 to 31 March 2010. It is based on findings from the visits that our Mental Health Act Commissioners and SOADs have made to services during the year. The report highlights the aims of the visits to improve the standards of care and treatment for detained patients. General findings suggest that there has been a fall in the number of informal patients who have been detained under the Act when they have tried to discharge themselves from hospital. There has been a marked reduction in the number of young people admitted to adult psychiatric wards under the Mental Health Act, especially of those under 16 years of age.

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A different ending: addressing inequalities in end of life care: people with a mental health condition

Author:
CARE QUALITY COMMISSION
Publisher:
Care Quality Commission
Publication year:
2016
Pagination:
2
Place of publication:
Newcastle upon Tyne

This document outlines the experience of barriers to good end of life care for people with a mental health condition. The report is one of a suite of documents reporting on the Care Quality Commission end of life care thematic review, and is designed to be read in conjunction with the other documents. People with serious mental illnesses (excluding dementia) die on average 20 years earlier than the rest of the population. They may be identified as approaching the end of life late, which can affect the ability to plan care that meets people’s individual needs. The review found limited information about end of life care for people with a mental health condition and suggests that the end of life care needs for this group may not being prioritised. Some people spoke about a lack of awareness of physical health needs among professionals caring for a person with a mental health condition, which led to delayed diagnosis of the person’s terminal condition. In some cases, where a person’s mental health condition was severe, there was no access to an appropriate service to care for them at the end of life, so they ended up dying in hospital. The document recommends that commissioners and providers support early identification of people with a mental health condition who may be approaching the end of life, as part of improved physical health care. (Edited publisher abstract)

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Monitoring the Mental Health Act in 2012/13; presented to Parliament by the Secretary of State for Health pursuant to section 120D(3) of the Mental Health Act 1983

Authors:
CARE QUALITY COMMISSION, GREAT BRITAIN. Department of Health
Publisher:
Care Quality Commission
Publication year:
2013
Pagination:
94
Place of publication:
Newcastle upon Tyne

This is the fourth annual report by the Care Quality Commission (CQC) on its monitoring of the use of the Mental Health Act 1983. It collates findings of CQC’s specialist MHA visits, the concerns of people who use services and of professional stakeholders, and policy issues relevant to psychiatric detention in England. In 2012/13 people were detained or treated under the MHA more than 50,000 times; and community treatment orders were imposed more than 4,600 times. The total number of people who are subject to the MHA has risen by 12% in the last five years, with 17,000 people detained at the end of 2012/13. The report considers the extent to which mental health services are responsive to people’s needs; ways in which people are subject to restrictions; issues around consent to treatment; access to care during mental health crisis; and deaths of patients subject to the Act. While there is welcome for improvements in access to independent advocacy services, in helping people to draw up advance statements of preferences for care and treatment, the report notes that 27% of care plans showed no evidence of patient involvement. CQC expects there to be change in respect of promoting dignity and autonomy; promoting cultures that support therapeutic practices and reduce restraint and seclusion to a minimum; and being proactive in embedding learning from the deaths of people subject to the Act. (Edited publisher abstract)

Book Full text available online for free

Monitoring the Mental Health Act in 2012/13: summary

Author:
CARE QUALITY COMMISSION
Publisher:
Care Quality Commission
Publication year:
2013
Pagination:
12
Place of publication:
Newcastle upon Tyne

This summary of the main report for 2012-13 outlines findings on the extent to which mental health services are responsive to people’s needs; ways in which people are subject to restrictions; issues around consent to treatment; access to care during a mental health crisis; and deaths of patients subject to the Act. It presents facts and figures, and notes areas of improvement and where the Care Quality Commission (CQC) expects to see change. (Original abstract)

Book Full text available online for free

Monitoring the Mental Health Act in 2011/12: presented to Parliament ... pursuant to section 120D(3) of the Mental Health Act 1983

Author:
CARE QUALITY COMMISSION
Publisher:
Care Quality Commission
Publication year:
2013
Pagination:
108
Place of publication:
Newcastle upon Tyne

This is the third annual report by the Care Quality Commission (CQC) on its monitoring of the use of the Mental Health Act 1983. Mental health is a major issue for this country. Nearly a quarter (23%) of the total burden of disease in the UK is attributable to mental disorder, compared to 16% for cancer and 16% for heart disease. Mental disorder has a broad range of impacts across health, education, work and criminal justice as well as links with health risk behaviour and associated premature mortality. The Government’s consultation on the NHS Constitution proposes amending the first guiding principle on the purpose of the NHS to explicitly include mental as well as physical health. The mid-term review, published in January 2013, includes improving the treatment and care of people with mental illness in its four key priorities for health and care. Overall, some hospitals and wards are doing a very good job in treating patients with dignity and respect. CQC found some overall improvement but most of the concerns highlighted in previous reports remain. There is a significant gap between the realities CQC is observing in practice and the ambitions of the national mental health policy. CQC is concerned that cultures may persist where control and containment are prioritised over the treatment and support of individuals.

Book

Monitoring the Mental Health Act in 2011/12: presented to Parliament ... pursuant to section 120D(3) of the Mental Health Act 1983: summary

Author:
CARE QUALITY COMMISSION
Publisher:
Care Quality Commission
Publication year:
2013
Pagination:
12p.
Place of publication:
Newcastle upon Tyne

This is the summary of the third annual report by the Care Quality Commission (CQC) on its monitoring of the use of the Mental Health Act 1983. Mental health is a major issue for this country. Nearly a quarter (23%) of the total burden of disease in the UK is attributable to mental disorder, compared to 16% for cancer and 16% for heart disease. Mental disorder has a broad range of impacts across health, education, work and criminal justice as well as links with health risk behaviour and associated premature mortality. The Government’s consultation on the NHS Constitution proposes amending the first guiding principle on the purpose of the NHS to explicitly include mental as well as physical health. The mid-term review, published in January 2013, includes improving the treatment and care of people with mental illness in its four key priorities for health and care. Overall, some hospitals and wards are doing a very good job in treating patients with dignity and respect. CQC found some overall improvement but most of the concerns highlighted in previous reports remain. There is a significant gap between the realities CQC is observing in practice and the ambitions of the national mental health policy. CQC is concerned that cultures may persist where control and containment are prioritised over the treatment and support of individuals.

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