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Journal article

Geel's deal

Author:
BRANDON David
Journal article citation:
Social Work Today, 11.7.91, 1991, pp.22-23.
Publisher:
British Association of Social Workers

Reports on a small town in Belgium with a very long history of adult placement of people with mental health problems.

Book

Consumers as colleagues

Authors:
BRANDON Althea, BRANDON David
Publisher:
MIND
Publication year:
1987
Pagination:
33p., illus., bibliogs.
Place of publication:
London
Journal article

A friend to alleged lunatics

Author:
BRANDON David
Journal article citation:
Mental Health Today, October 2007, pp.37-39.
Publisher:
Pavilion
Place of publication:
Hove

John Thomas Perceval founded the first ever user-led advocacy service, the Alleged Lunatics' Friends Society in 1845. The author discusses the work of John Perceval and how his beliefs about mental distress and recovery resonate with those of the service user/survivor and advocacy movements today.

Journal article

Peer advocacy

Author:
BRANDON David
Journal article citation:
Care in Place the International Journal of Networks and Community, 1(3), December 1994, pp.218-224.

People with disabilities are disempowered by changes in delivery of services in non-hospital settings. In Canada many developments have been achieved in advanced service delivery systems, beyond the limited designs elsewhere. None the less, these influences have reached services in the UK, where brokerage services have been established in some settings. Three clear stages have emerged in the analysis of successful advocacy systems: ad hoc pressure by individuals; demonstration pilot schemes; mainstream provision.

Journal article Full text available online for free

How users can shape services

Author:
BRANDON David
Journal article citation:
Care Plan, 1(2), December 1994, pp.9-13.
Publisher:
Positive Publications/ Anglia Polytechnic University, Faculty of Health and Social Work

People with mental health problems are more likely to receive individualised services if they are able to be direct, suggests the author, Describes the origins of the idea and how it could be introduced in Britain.

Journal article

Money for change?

Author:
BRANDON David
Journal article citation:
Care in Place the International Journal of Networks and Community, 1(3), December 1994, pp.211-217.

Traces the history of peer advocacy in mental health services. Explores alternate definitions of the term, and provides some examples of action linked with changes in the citizens advocacy movement. Staff resistance to these changes are documented, with possible explanations for the dynamic. Other obstacles to change are identified, with an attempt to define essential features of the model in action.

Book

Innovation without change: consumer power in psychiatric services

Author:
BRANDON David
Publisher:
Macmillan
Publication year:
1991
Pagination:
192p.,bibliogs.
Place of publication:
Basingstoke

Traces the history of mental illness services to the present day. Argues that the only way to improve these is to listen to the users, and to give them a say in the planning and running of services.

Journal article

Service user involvement in postgraduate mental health education: does it benefit practice?

Authors:
KHOO Richard, McIVAR Andrew, BRANDON David
Journal article citation:
Journal of Mental Health, 13(5), October 2004, pp.481-492.
Publisher:
Informa Healthcare
Place of publication:
London

Few universities involve service users in the presentation of postgraduate mental health education. This retrospective study evaluates their influence on Masters students within a course that has done so for several years. Questionnaires were sent to all students who had completed Masters-level modules that had substantial user involvement. All students were experienced practitioners, and currently employed. The modules, and courses of which they are a component, were designed in 1993/94 by educationalists and senior representatives of user groups, and continue to be managed and monitored by personnel who include senior user representatives. Twenty-six out of 41 questionnaires were returned and 10 of these respondents were also later interviewed by telephone. Most respondents (79%) were very enthused by the user contributions; none considered their involvement was poor. A majority (87%) felt that they had benefited personally and professionally from the involvement of service users in the programme. Most significantly, from the perspective of postgraduate study outcomes and practice development, many had implemented user-focused initiatives in their practice as a consequence of undertaking their studies. The findings suggest that a contribution by service users to postgraduate programmes can motivate practitioners to implement changes to their practice in innovative ways.

Journal article

Making direct payments a choice: a report on the research findings

Authors:
MAGLAJLIC Rea, BRANDON David, GIVEN David
Journal article citation:
Disability and Society, 15(1), January 2000, pp.99-113.
Publisher:
Taylor and Francis,

This article describes research done in the London Borough of Tower Hamlets under the supervision of the local Coalition of Disabled People. It involved three different client groups-people with learning difficulties, mental health service users and those with physical disabilities. The study focused on several issues: how to provide effective information; what sorts of support could direct payments purchase; how could it be accessed; how could users handle the money; how could it all be evaluated? Most carers, staff and users considered this radical idea favourably, but were suspicious of their own local authority and would want independent systems of supervision and monitoring, accountable to other users, rather than professionals.

Journal article

A necessary madness: the role of the wounded healer in contemporary mental health care

Author:
BRANDON David
Journal article citation:
Mental Health Care, 2(6), February 1999, pp.198-200.
Publisher:
Pavilion

The author discusses his belief that some eastern ideologies offer a way forward for those seeking a genuinely holistic approach to working with clients. Looks in particular at shamanism as a holistic model.

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