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Employment and mental health

Authors:
KHAN Masood, BOARDMAN Jed
Publisher:
Royal College of Psychiatrists
Publication year:
2017
Pagination:
32
Place of publication:
London

This report focus on mental health and employment, examining the recent national initiatives and policies and the key arguments for improving the access of people with mental health conditions to the labour market, and setting out key priorities and future prospects. The paper suggests that as well as offering a number of social, health and economic benefits, strong moral and human rights arguments can be put forward to support the creation of employment opportunities for people with mental health problems. The paper highlights a number of approaches to improving employment support, focusing in particular on the following themes: the importance of work and employment for personal recovery; the value of approaching treatment and employment support in parallel; the importance of a clear social perspective on health and social interventions in medical training and in the training of psychiatrists; the need for an integrated approach to employment support; the implementation of evidence-based approaches to supported employment; the clarification of the role of mental health in occupational health services; the importance of primary care services; the importance of valuing people’s lived experience of mental health problems; the development of a clear perspective on public mental health and employment; and the need to define the role of commissioning in improving employment opportunities for people with mental health problems. (Edited publisher abstract)

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Immigration Removal Centres in England: a mental health needs analysis

Authors:
DURCAN Graham, STUBBS Jessica, BOARDMAN Jed
Publication year:
2017
Pagination:
49
Place of publication:
London

Sets out the findings of a rapid mental health needs assessment across Immigration Removal Centres (IRCs) in England. Ten IRCs were assessed to explore the wellbeing of detainees, the services in place and the perspectives of people working with those detained. The report finds that people detained in IRCs often face significant challenges to their mental health and that levels of distress, problems with living conditions and lack of both certainty and liberty, all had a significant impact on the wellbeing of those detained. The most commonly reported problem was depressed mood or anxiety, and the most severe reported problems were hallucinations or delusions. The report finds some positive examples of services, such as psychological therapy, wellbeing groups and the support provided by chaplains. But it also finds that most detainees felt that they were not listened to, not taken seriously, or treated as if they were lying. Similarly, some staff reported that it was easy to become assimilated into a culture which disbelieved detainees. In addition, mental health care staff face significant challenges working in IRCs where people may be removed at short notice and face high levels of uncertainty about their future. The report highlights the multifaceted wellbeing needs of people in immigration detention, and makes recommendations to address this. It calls for greater lengths to ensure that those with a marked vulnerability are not detained; mental health awareness training for all IRC staff; 24/7 access to crisis care; and greater provision of alternative support such as peer support and relaxation groups. (Edited publisher abstract)

Journal article

Social exclusion and mental health - how people with mental health problems are disadvantaged: an overview

Author:
BOARDMAN Jed
Journal article citation:
Mental Health and Social Inclusion, 15(3), 2011, pp.112-121.
Publisher:
Emerald

Social exclusion is a major problem in the UK. Evidence shows that those with mental health problems or learning disabilities are excluded from participation in many areas of society. This article provides an overview of aspects of social exclusion, and the way in which certain groups are excluded from mainstream society. It summarises the main findings of the work of the Royal College of Psychiatrists Scoping Group on Social Exclusion and Mental Health. The article suggests that a person is socially excluded if they do not participate in key activities of the society in which he or she lives. People with mental health problems, particularly those with long-term psychoses, are among the most excluded groups. They may be excluded from material resources and living in relative poverty, excluded from socially valued productive activity, excluded from social relations and neighbourhoods, and also excluded from civic participation and health and health services.

Journal article

Putting recovery into mental health practice

Authors:
SHEPHERD Geoff, BOARDMAN Jed, SLADE Mike
Journal article citation:
Mental Health Today, May 2008, pp.28-31.
Publisher:
Pavilion
Place of publication:
Hove

While the concept of recovery requires further development, the author argues that it provides a framework that could bring a radical transformation of mental health services in the UK. This article, based on a longer policy paper produced by the Sainsbury Centre, presents some of the key ideas and their implications for the delivery of mental health services.

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Making recovery a reality

Authors:
SHEPHERD Geoff, BOARDMAN Jed, SLADE Mike
Publisher:
Sainsbury Centre for Mental Health
Publication year:
2008
Pagination:
16p., bibliog.
Place of publication:
London

Helping people to recover their lives should be the top priority for mental health services. This means giving service users the chance to determine what future they want for themselves and offering practical support to help them to achieve it. While recovery is already government policy, the reality is that mental health services still focus more on managing people's symptoms than their work, education and family life. Yet these are what matter most to most people. The authors say "Recovery is a truly radical idea. It turns mental health services' priorities on their heads. Traditional services wait until a person's illness is cured before helping them to get their life back. Recovery-focused services aim from day one to help people to build a life for themselves. The medical care they give is in support of that bigger purpose." Making Recovery a Reality says mental health services need to change radically to focus on recovery. They need to demonstrate success in helping service users to get their lives back and giving service users the chance to make their own decisions about how they live their lives.

Book Full text available online for free

More than shelter: supported accommodation and mental health

Author:
BOARDMAN Jed
Publisher:
Centre for Mental Health
Publication year:
2016
Pagination:
36
Place of publication:
London

This report looks at evidence about the provision of supported housing for people with mental health problems in England, including those with multiple needs and substance misuse, and presents key themes for its future development. It highlights the significant links between housing and mental wellbeing, indicating that factors such as overcrowding, insufficient daylight and fear of crime all contribute to poorer mental health. The review identifies a wide range of types of housing support, including help for people to remain their own tenancies to specialist supported accommodation, hostels, crisis houses and the Housing First approach. Although the review identified limited evidence about what kinds of housing support are most effective and cost-effective, small-scale studies suggest that housing support can reduce the costs of hospital stays. When looking at the type of support people want, the literature found most people prefer help in their own homes to being in sheltered or transitional accommodation. The report calls for better provision of housing support and also argues that housing support should be funded jointly by local authorities and the NHS to ensure that services are delivered in partnership between health, housing and social care providers. (Edited publisher abstract)

Journal article

Mental health and employment

Author:
BOARDMAN Jed
Journal article citation:
Mental Health Review, 6(4), December 2001, pp.6-12.
Publisher:
Pier Professional

Work is important in maintaining mental health and promoting the recovery who have experienced mental health problems. Discusses the importance of vocational rehabilitation services and current provision in the UK.

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Risk, safety and recovery

Authors:
BOARDMAN Jed, ROBERTS Glenn
Publishers:
Centre for Mental Health, NHS Confederation. Mental Health Network
Publication year:
2014
Pagination:
22
Place of publication:
London

This briefing paper examines current approaches to risk management in mental health care and explains why these need to be changed to be more support of people's personal recovery. It identifies ways of moving towards recovery-orientated risk assessment based on involving service users in shared decision making and jointly produced 'safety plans'. It argues that jointly produced ‘safety plans’ can be more effective ways of managing risk as well as enabling people to get on with their lives. The paper also looks at the organisational issues that need to be considered when taking a person-centred safety planning approach and presents ten key recommendations. (Edited publisher abstract)

Book

Social inclusion and mental health

Editors:
BOARDMAN Jed, et al, (eds.)
Publisher:
RCPsych Publications
Publication year:
2010
Pagination:
384p.
Place of publication:
London

A wider range of contributors - including academics, consultants, people who use services and their carers - bring together varied experiences, evidence, research and everyday practices on the social inclusion of people mental health problems. The report looks at how psychiatrists and mental health workers can facilitate the social inclusion of people with mental health problems. Part 1 looks at what social exclusion is and how it is relevant to psychiatry. Part 2 examines the scope of social exclusion covering: disadvantage and poverty; how people are excluded; the exclusion of specific groups with mental health problem, ‘finding acceptance: the experiences of people who use mental health services’, and carers’ perspectives on social inclusion. Part 3 looks towards a future of socially inclusive practice with psychiatry services. The publication is relevant for mental health professionals, medical educators, policy makers and mental health service providers.

Journal article Full text available online for free

Work and employment for people with psychiatric disabilities

Authors:
BOARDMAN Jed, et al
Journal article citation:
British Journal of Psychiatry, 182(6), June 2003, pp.467-468.
Publisher:
Royal College of Psychiatrists

Community mental health teams have a central role in assessing need and facilitating access to relevant local opportunities. Specialist vocational workers integrated into these teams can ensure that these needs are met within the existing care-planning approach. Vocational support cannot be simply handed over to specialists, and once people are in work any continuing support should remain the responsibility of the key worker. A satisfactory working life may reduce the need for clinical support, but such support should remain available and be tailored where possible to the constraints of the individual's working life.

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