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Journal article

Rethinking ‘evidence’: towards survivor-led understandings

Author:
BERESFORD Peter
Journal article citation:
Open Mind, 171, March 2012, pp.6-7.
Publisher:
MIND

Evidence-based policy and practice involves a whole set of assumptions and hierarchies in research. As a result, ‘evidence’ tends to be dominated by academic researchers (often influenced by the physical sciences and medical approaches) and neglects the views and experiences of people who use and work in health and social services. This article argues that policy and practice in mental health needs to shift focus from the value base of ‘evidence-based’ to that of ‘knowledge-based’.  Improvements can be made through meaningful engagement with a diverse cross-section of service users in order to properly address their needs and tailor appropriate services.  Survivor and service user researchers are building up an increasing volume of credible knowledge which is beginning to have an impact on policy and practice. This is based on new research values of acknowledging subjectivity, engagement and the validity and contribution of experiential knowledge.

Journal article

Social work and a social model of madness and distress: developing a viable role for the future

Author:
BERESFORD Peter
Journal article citation:
Social Work and Social Sciences Review, 12(2), 2005, pp.48-58.
Publisher:
Whiting and Birch

This article explores the social model in relation to 'mental health' policy and practice generally and social work specifically. It highlights the continuing dominance of bio-medical approaches to and interpretations of 'mental health'; examines the development and nature of mainstream social approaches and considers mental health service users' own discussions of a social model of madness and distress. The article looks at the ramifications for social work which is based on a social model of madness and distress; what it might look like and what infrastructural supports it is likely to require to develop effectively.

Journal article

Linking up

Author:
BERESFORD Peter
Journal article citation:
Open Mind, 62, April 1993, p.21.
Publisher:
MIND

Calls for the psychiatric survivors' movement to consider its relation within the broader disability movement.

Journal article

We did it our way

Authors:
BERESFORD Peter, BEALES Anne
Journal article citation:
Openmind, 136, November 2005, pp.6-7.
Publisher:
MIND

The authors show how a group of long-term, current mental health service users with minimal previous experience were able to undertake good-quality research, given the opportunity and proper support. They report on the group Service User Research and Evaluation (SURE) and their research on service user views of the services of the Mental After Care Association (MACA's).

Journal article Full text available online for free

'Meet the diversity of need'

Author:
BERESFORD Peter
Journal article citation:
Care Plan, 2(4), June 1996, p.14.
Publisher:
Positive Publications/ Anglia Polytechnic University, Faculty of Health and Social Work

This article is an edited version of a briefing about Survivors Speak Out.

Journal article

Turning the tables

Author:
BERESFORD Peter
Journal article citation:
Openmind, 116, July 2002, pp.16-17.
Publisher:
MIND

Reports on how research opportunities are opening up for mental health users/survivors.

Book

Our voice in our future: mental health issues

Author:
BERESFORD Peter
Publisher:
National Institute for Social Work/Shaping Our Lives
Publication year:
2000
Pagination:
28p.,bibliog.
Place of publication:
London

Published as part of the Shaping Our Lives project, this booklet looks at involving users in mental health services and includes chapters on: changes in the past twenty years; current provision for mental health users; issues for black and minority ethnic users/survivors; current plans for mental health services; users' views on proposed changes; and users' views on alternatives.

Book Full text available online for free

From mental illness to a social model of madness and distress

Authors:
BERESFORD Peter, et al
Publisher:
Shaping Our Lives
Publication year:
2016
Pagination:
76
Place of publication:
London

This report draws on the views and experiences of mental health service users/survivors, regarding mental health policy, models and services. It aims to update findings of an earlier 2010 report, ‘Towards a social model of madness and distress?’, which found that mental health service users/survivors felt that a medical model dominated both public and professional thinking and that further discussions about more social approaches to mental health were needed. A total of 82 people took part in this second stage project through discussion groups, individual interviews, and an on-line survey. Participants included a diverse range of service users including, people from rural and urban areas, older women and people from black and minority ethnic backgrounds. Organised in six main sections, the report draws heavily on the comments of service users and includes quotations throughout. The six sections explore mental health service users’/survivors’ views on: a medical model of mental health; reclaiming the term ‘madness’; the social model of disability as applied to mental health; the idea and policy of recovery; social approaches to mental health; and taking forward social approaches to mental health. A final section brings together the findings from the project and offers a set of possible ways of taking them forward. (Edited publisher abstract)

Book Full text available online for free

Towards a social model of madness and distress?: exploring what service users say

Authors:
BERESFORD Peter, NETTLE Mary, PERRING Rebecca
Publisher:
Joseph Rowntree Foundation
Publication year:
2010
Pagination:
4p.
Place of publication:
York

There has been more emphasis on social approaches to mental health in recent years, reflected, for example, in the establishment of the Social Perspectives Network. There have been some initial discussions about a social model relating to mental health among mental health service users/survivors. However, as yet, this has not been widely explored or developed. This report provides a summary of a national study which explores with mental health service users what models they feel underpin current thinking in mental health policy and practice. It asks what effects these models may have, and looks at what models service users think might be helpful. Key findings suggest that most service users believe that a medical model based on deficit and pathology still dominates public and professional understanding of mental health issues, shaping attitudes and policy. The idea of a social model of madness and distress, following the format of the social model of disability, met mixed views. The labelling and stigma following from a medical model of mental illness are major barriers for mental health service users. Service users see social approaches to mental health issues as much more helpful.

Book Full text available online for free

Towards a social model of madness and distress?: exploring what service users say

Authors:
BERESFORD Peter, NETTLE Mary, PERRING Rebecca
Publisher:
Joseph Rowntree Foundation
Publication year:
2010
Pagination:
45p.
Place of publication:
York

There has been more emphasis on social approaches to mental health in recent years, reflected, for example, in the establishment of the Social Perspectives Network. There have been some initial discussions about a social model relating to mental health among mental health service users/survivors. However, as yet, this has not been widely explored or developed. This national study explores with mental health service users what models they feel underpin current thinking in mental health policy and practice. It asks what effects these models may have, and looks at what models service users think might be helpful. Four key issues were explored with service users; how mental health issues are understood in society; their personal understandings of mental health issues; the social model of disability in relation to mental health; and their personal understandings of madness and distress within a social model of disability. Key findings suggest that most service users believe that a medical model based on deficit and pathology still dominates public and professional understanding of mental health issues, shaping attitudes and policy. The idea of a social model of madness and distress, following the format of the social model of disability, met mixed views. The labelling and stigma following from a medical model of mental illness are major barriers for mental health service users. Service users see social approaches to mental health issues as much more helpful.

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