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Journal article

Weight status of persons with intellectual disabilities

Authors:
MAASKANT Marian A., et al
Journal article citation:
Journal of Applied Research in Intellectual Disabilities, 22(5), September 2009, pp.426-432.
Publisher:
Wiley-Blackwell

The weight and weight status of a group of people with learning disabilities in the Netherlands were studied in 2002 and 2007, to examine the differences in weight and weight status between 2002 and 2007 and the risk groups for (becoming) overweight/obese. The mean increase in Body Mass Index (BMI) between 2002 and 2007 was 0.8 (2.2 kg). In 2002, 36% of the study group was overweight/obese; this was higher in 2007: 45%. The expected relationship between increase in BMI and the change in living circumstances could not be confirmed. Further research into health-control programmes, weight status, food-intake and physical exercise is recommended.

Journal article

Architects of reform

Author:
KAEHNE Axel
Journal article citation:
Learning Disability Today, 9(5), July 2009, pp.34-36.
Publisher:
Pavilion
Place of publication:
Hove

Highlights the key themes from a series of research papers delivered at a round table summit involving academics and practitioners from the US, UK, Netherlands, Germany and Australia looking at what really improves lives for people with learning disabilities.

Journal article

Understanding predictors of low physical activity in adults with intellectual disabilities

Authors:
FINLAYSON Janet, et al
Journal article citation:
Journal of Applied Research in Intellectual Disabilities, 22(3), May 2009, pp.236-247.
Publisher:
Wiley-Blackwell

Lack of regular physical activity is globally one of the most significant risks to health. The main aims of this study were to describe the types and levels of regular physical activity undertaken by adults with intellectual disabilities, and to investigate the factors predicting low activity. Interviews were conducted with a community-based sample of adults with intellectual disabilities (n = 433) at two time points. Data hypothesized to be predictive of low levels of activity were collected at time 1. Descriptive data were collected on the frequency and intensity, and actual level of participation in activities at time 2. Only 150 (34.6%) adults with intellectual disabilities undertook any regular activity of at least moderate intensity. This was of shorter duration, compared with the general population. Older age, having immobility, epilepsy, no daytime opportunities, living in congregate care and faecal incontinence were independently predictive of low levels of activity. These results are a step towards informing the development of interventions to promote the health of adults with intellectual disabilities through increased physical activity

Journal article

Coming alive as Olivia

Author:
ASPIS Simone
Journal article citation:
Community Living, 22(3), Spring 2009, p.12.
Publisher:
Hexagon Publishing

The author interviews Olivia Lightfeet, a man with learning disabilities who wants to become a women. Olivia is People First's Diversity Officer and currently trains self-advocacy groups in diversity issues, including those to do with transsexuals and transgender.

Journal article

Jobs for the boys - and girls

Author:
CANHAM Kathy
Journal article citation:
Learning Disability Today, December 2008, pp.16-18.
Publisher:
Pavilion
Place of publication:
Hove

The Realistic Opportunities for Supported Employment (ROSE) project run by Havering College in Essex places people with learning disabilities into paid employment and supports them until they feel able to hold down the job. ROSE has an 80% success rate. This article looks at how the project works.

Journal article

Resisting having learning disabilities by managing relative abilities

Authors:
MCVITTIE Chris, GOODALL Karen E., MCKINLAY Andy
Journal article citation:
British Journal of Learning Disabilities, 36(4), December 2008, pp.256-262.
Publisher:
Wiley-Blackwell

Previous research has shown that identities and the attributes from which identities are inferred are negotiated within social interaction and language. The identity of having learning disabilities is commonly associated with ascriptions of lesser abilities than other people, and in turn might be inferred from such abilities. This study examines how individuals, potentially ascribed with an identity of having learning disabilities, discursively manage the ascription of abilities and disabilities relative to other people. Semi-structured interviews were carried out with eight individuals attending a community centre in Edinburgh categorised as having learning disabilities. Interview transcripts were coded for all references to relative abilities and analysed using discourse analysis. The participants displayed three orientations towards abilities, namely (i) ascribing deficits to 'others', (ii) resisting comparisons of deficit and (iii) claiming 'normal' attributes. For the participants, these negotiations of relative abilities provide ways of managing specific aspects of identities associated with learning disabilities.

Journal article

People with a learning disability as home owners

Author:
WORKMAN Ansley
Journal article citation:
Llais, 90, Winter 2008, pp.3-6.
Publisher:
Learning Disability Wales

The author explains work going on in Wales to provide home ownership options for people with learning disabilities. The article discusses variations of the shared ownership housing model.

Journal article

Intellectual disability in homeless adults: a prevalence study

Authors:
OAKES Peter M., DAVIES Ros C.
Journal article citation:
Journal of Intellectual Disabilities, 12(4), December 2008, pp.325-334.
Publisher:
Sage
Place of publication:
London

There has been considerable recent interest in the health and associated socio-economic inequalities faced by adults with learning disabilities. A serious and so far under-reported aspect of this is homelessness. This study sought to determine the prevalence of intellectual disability in a homeless population. Fifty people registered at a general practice in north-east England for socially excluded groups, and staying in temporary accommodation for the homeless during 2006-7, were assessed for learning disability. Full-scale and verbal IQ scores for the group were significantly lower than would be expected in the general population, but there was no significant difference in performance IQ. Homeless people are significantly more likely to have an intellectual disability than the general population. The implications for practice and policy development are far reaching. Further work is required to confirm these findings and to explore the experience of homeless people with intellectual disability.

Book

Housing and residential services

Author:
HEGINBOTHAM Chris
Publisher:
Campaign for People with Mental Handicap
Publication year:
1986
Pagination:
8p., bibliog.
Place of publication:
London
Journal article

Supported employment for people with learning disabilities: the case of full-time work

Author:
McINALLY George
Journal article citation:
Tizard Learning Disability Review, 13(3), October 2008, pp.42-46.
Publisher:
Emerald

North Lanarkshire Council's supported employment has achieved a reputation for delivering full-time work for people who have learning disabilities. Since 1999, the service has accessed 175 jobs, and current supports 127 individuals who work more than 16 hours a week. This article describes how the approach taken by North Lanarkshire can be adopted by other authorities.

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