Filter results

Register/log in to your SCIE account to use the search filters below

Search results for ‘Subject term:"learning disabilities"’ Sort:  

Results 31 - 40 of 9868

Book

Helping mentally handicapped people with special problems: report of a DHSS study team

Author:
GREAT BRITAIN. Department of Health and Social Security
Publisher:
Great Britain. Department of Health and Social Security
Publication year:
1984
Pagination:
117p., bibliog.
Place of publication:
London
Book

Intellectual impairement: the battle against handicap

Authors:
HERON Alastair, MYERS Mary
Publisher:
Academic Press
Publication year:
1983
Pagination:
176p.,bibliog.
Place of publication:
London
Book

Survey of parents of the mentally handicapped

Author:
BOLTON COMMUNITY HEALTH COUNCIL
Publisher:
Bolton. Community Health Council
Publication year:
1983
Pagination:
39p.
Place of publication:
Bolton
Book

Profound mental handicap

Authors:
NORRIS David, FERGUSON Susan, LEVITT Sophie
Publisher:
Costello
Publication year:
1982
Pagination:
xii,167p.bibliog.
Place of publication:
Tunbridge Wells
Book

Frontiers of knowledge in mental retardation. Volume I, social, educational and behavorial aspects

Editor:
MITTLER Peter
Publisher:
University Park Press
Publication year:
1980
Pagination:
xxxvii,467p.,bibliog.
Place of publication:
Baltimore, MD
Journal article

Care staff perceptions of choking incidents: what details are reported?

Authors:
GUTHRIE Susan, LECKO Caroline, RODDAM Hazel
Journal article citation:
Journal of Applied Research in Intellectual Disabilities, 28(2), 2015, pp.121-132.
Publisher:
Wiley-Blackwell

Background: Following a series of fatal choking incidents in one UK specialist service, this study evaluated the detail included in incident reporting. This study compared the enhanced reporting system in the specialist service with the national reporting and learning system. Methods: Eligible reports were selected from a national organisation and a specialist service using search terms relevant to adults with intellectual disability and/or mental ill health. Qualitative analysis was completed with comparison of themes identified in both sets of reports. Findings: The numbers of choking incidents identified in national reports suggest under-reporting compared with the specialist service and varying levels of severity. Themes included trends in timing, care setting and food textures as perceived by staff. Conclusions: This study demonstrates paucity of detail in reporting in systems without additional question prompts. Adding these questions requires staff to include greater detail which enables learning and risk mitigation to take place. (Edited publisher abstract)

Journal article

Psychotherapy with persons with intellectual disabilities: a review of effectiveness research

Authors:
PROUT H. Thompson, BROWNING Brooke K.
Journal article citation:
Advances in Mental Health and Intellectual Disabilities, 5(5), 2011, pp.53-59.
Publisher:
Emerald

This review aims to provide an update on the effectiveness of psychotherapy with persons with intellectual disabilities. It summarises the conclusions of other reviews published in the last ten years, including a recent review by the authors. There is evidence that psychotherapy with persons with intellectual disabilities is at least moderately effective. There is also evidence of effectiveness of psychotherapy across child and adolescent and adult age groups. A range of therapeutic interventions are effective and a spectrum of problems can be addressed via psychotherapy. However the authors found relatively little relevant research literature and noted a lack of methodologically sound and rigorous studies. They suggest there is a need for well-designed studies, particularly randomised controlled trials, better specification of treatments (e.g. manualised), better outcome measures, and clearer specification of diagnostic categories within the intellectual disability population.

Journal article

Measuring the actual levels and patterns of physical activity/inactivity of adults with intellectual disabilities

Authors:
FINLAYSON Janet, TURNER Angela, GRANAT Malcolm H.
Journal article citation:
Journal of Applied Research in Intellectual Disabilities, 24(6), November 2011, pp.508-517.
Publisher:
Wiley-Blackwell

Adults with intellectual disabilities experience higher rates of morbidity and mortality associated with low levels of activity compared to the general population. Previous research on physical activity levels in this group suggests as few as 5% could be meeting the target levels of exercise deemed necessary for a healthy lifestyle. The aim of this pilot study was to objectively measure the levels and patterns of activity of adults with intellectual disabilities, to inform the design of studies aimed at increasing activity and health in this population. Interviews were conducted with 62 community-based adults from Glasgow with mild to moderate intellectual disabilities (mean age 37 years, 56.5% female). Participants were interviewed at the start and at the end of a 7-day period of physical activity/inactivity measurement using an activity monitor. Forty-one (66%) participants wore the activity monitor for at least 5 days. Of these, only 11 (27%) achieved the recommended 10 000 steps per day, and only six (15%) were achieving the recommended 30 minutes of moderate/vigorous activity at least 5 days per week. The data confirm the belief that adults with mild to moderate learning disabilities have low levels of physical activity.

Journal article

Ball and chain

Author:
CLAWSON Rachael
Journal article citation:
Learning Disability Today, April 2011, pp.26-28.
Publisher:
Pavilion
Place of publication:
Hove

Children and adults with learning disabilities can be at risk from forced marriage. This article discusses the risk and possible consequences of forced marriage, and the role of professionals in preventing abuse. It also highlights key factors which differentiate forced marriages of people with learning disabilities from those without.

Journal article

Research unpacked: damage limitation

Authors:
HESLOP Pauline, MACAULAY Fiona
Journal article citation:
Learning Disability Today, 10(1), January 2010, pp.16-18.
Publisher:
Pavilion
Place of publication:
Hove

This article describes a study which looked at how people with learning disabilities who self-injure make sense of their self-injury and what they say would help most. Twenty-five people with learning disabilities and personal experience of self-injury took part in 1 to 4 research interviews between 2006 and 2008. All the participants were able to describe examples of circumstances leading up to their self-injury. These included external factors over which the participant had little control such as not being listened to, interpersonal factors such as being bullied, and internal factors caused for example by particular thoughts or memories. The participants identified the feelings they experienced before self-injuring, the most common being angry, sad, depressed, low, frustrated, or wound up. Over three-quarters of the participants considered that having someone to talk to who would listen to them would help, and also wanted someone to help look after their injuries. Being encouraged not to self-injure was considered helpful by some and unhelpful by others. The article concludes that the results challenge existing practice which considers that nothing can be done, and indicate the need to work with each person individually to help them use coping strategies. Creating conditions where people with learning disabilities have choice and control over their lives is also important.

Key to icons

  • Free resource Free resource
  • Journal article Journal article
  • Book Book
  • Digital media Digital media
  • Journal Journal

Give us your feedback

Social Care Online continues to be developed in response to user feedback.

Contact us with your comments and for any problems using the website.

Sign up/login for more

Register/login to use standard search filters, access resource links, advanced search and email alerts