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Journal article

Art therapy and learning disability

Author:
KUCZAJ Ed
Journal article citation:
Mencap News, 45, June 1994, pp.12-13.

Describes how art therapy can help people with learning disabilities.

Journal article

Physiotherapy in learning disability

Author:
FRASER Rita
Journal article citation:
Mencap News, 45, June 1994, pp.4-5.

Shows how physiotherapy can be used with people with learning difficulties.

Journal article

A multi-sensory experience

Author:
AYRES Mike
Journal article citation:
Access by Design, 64, May 1994, pp.9-11.
Publisher:
Centre for Accessible Environments

Describes the theory and practice of multi-sensory environments such as snoezelen rooms for people with special needs.

Journal article

Snoezelen - your questions answered?

Author:
CAVET Judith
Journal article citation:
Community Living, 7(3), January 1994, p.26.
Publisher:
Hexagon Publishing

Looks at the background to the development of multi-sensory environments such as snoezelen. Provides a checklist of other options which should be looked at first.

Journal article

Non-aversive and mildly aversive procedures for reducing problem behaviours in people with developmental disorders: a review

Authors:
LANCIONI Giulio E., HOOGEVEEN Frans
Journal article citation:
Mental Handicap Research, 3(2), 1990, pp.137-160.
Publisher:
BIMH Publications

During the last few years, great concern has been expressed about the use of aversive procedures for reducing deviant behaviours in people with developmental disorders. Given this situation, the role of non-aversive and mildly aversive procedures has become increasingly relevant. Reviews such procedures with regard to their outcomes, the characteristics of people treatment, and the deviant behaviours involved, based on studies published during the last 15 years.

Journal article

Dog phobia in people with mental handicaps : anxiety management training and exposure treatments

Authors:
LINDSAY William R., et al
Journal article citation:
Mental Handicap Research, 1(1), 1988, pp.39-48.
Publisher:
BIMH Publications
Journal article

Is EMDR an effective treatment for people diagnosed with both intellectual disability and post-traumatic stress disorder?

Author:
GILDERTHORP Rosanna C.
Journal article citation:
Journal of Intellectual Disabilities, 19(1), 2015, pp.58-68.
Publisher:
Sage
Place of publication:
London

This study aimed to critically review all studies that have set out to evaluate the use of eye movement desensitization and reprocessing (EMDR) for people diagnosed with both intellectual disability (ID) and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Searches of the online databases Psych Info, The Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, The Cochrane Database of Randomized Control Trials, CINAHL, ASSIA and Medline were conducted. Five studies are described and evaluated. Key positive points include the high clinical salience of the studies and their high external validity. Several common methodological criticisms are highlighted, however, including difficulty in the definition of the terms ID and PTSD, lack of control in design and a lack of consideration of ethical implications. Overall, the articles reviewed indicate cause for cautious optimism about the utility of EMDR with this population. The clinical and research implications of this review are discussed. (Publisher abstract)

Journal article

The Good Thinking! course — developing a group-based treatment for people with learning disabilities who are at risk of offending

Authors:
GOODMAN Wendy, et al
Journal article citation:
Journal of Learning Disabilities and Offending Behaviour, 2(3), 2011, pp.114-121.
Publisher:
Emerald

Offender treatment programmes are often inaccessible to those with learning disabilities, which may mean those convicted of offences may receive no offender treatment. This paper describes the development of the “Good Thinking!” course, a group-based offender treatment programme designed to help address this need. It aims to inform and encourage clinicians and commissioners working in this field to increase the availability of specialist community-based treatments for offenders who have learning disabilities. The course comprises 23 two-hour sessions run once a week in a community setting. Based on the premise that people who commit offences are often trying to meet ordinary life goals through anti-social means, it aims to help participants identify and understand their goals, develop the social skills necessary, and teaches a problem-solving strategy for more complex problems. A description of the course and a case study are provided. However, to date, insufficient data have been produced to enable a formal evaluation of the effectiveness of the course.

Journal article

Redesigning and evaluating an adapted sex offender treatment programme for offenders with an intellectual disability in a secure setting: preliminary findings

Authors:
LARGE Julia, THOMAS Cathy
Journal article citation:
Journal of Learning Disabilities and Offending Behaviour, 2(2), 2011, pp.72-83.
Publisher:
Emerald

This study examined the needs of multiple stakeholders in an adapted sex offender treatment programme (ASOTP), and evaluated a pilot programme set up to respond to the identified needs. Stakeholders included purchasers of Partnerships in Care Learning Disability Services, referred clients, internal and external clinicians involved in their care and group facilitators. Data was gathered from questionnaires and semi-structured interviews in order to determine the key issues necessitating change. An ASOTP was designed and piloted to address highlighted needs, including time frames for the commencement and completion of treatment. Feedback was positive, with participants showing an increase in motivation, knowledge, and, unexpectedly, enhanced levels of risk disclosure. Facilitators reported increased satisfaction and decreased stress levels. The programme was tailored to respond to individual treatment needs within a group setting whilst ensuring programme integrity and effective risk management within a forensic learning disability service. Implications for future research in terms of improving treatment effectiveness are discussed.

Journal article

Group treatment for men with learning disabilities who are at risk of sexually offending: themes arising from the four-stage model to offending

Authors:
GOODMAN Wendy, et al
Journal article citation:
British Journal of Learning Disabilities, 36(4), December 2008, pp.249-255.
Publisher:
Wiley-Blackwell

This paper reports on the process of helping offenders, and those at risk of offending, with mild learning disabilities, understand their steps to offending. The four-stage model of sexual offending provides a framework to enable participants and facilitators to understand the individuals' offending, in particular the steps or stages that lead to it. This is one of the modules in a nationally provided group-based treatment programme. Four men completed the local programme and their progress during this module is reported. A number of themes arising from the work the men did in this module are also discussed.

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