Filter results

Register/log in to your SCIE account to use the search filters below

Search results for ‘Subject term:"learning disabilities"’ Sort:  

Results 1 - 10 of 616

Book Full text available online for free

Supported internships

Author:
GREAT BRITAIN. Department for Education
Publisher:
Great Britain. Department for Education
Publication year:
2014
Pagination:
63
Place of publication:
London

This guide explains what supported internships are and why they have been introduced. It also provides practical advice on developing, implementing and delivering supported internships, including information on funding, programme design, staffing, and the various partnerships on which supported internships are founded. The advice draws heavily on the experiences of the 15 colleges who took part in the 2012/13 supported internship trial set up by the Department for Education. It also draws on the experiences of other providers who have been running programmes to support young people with learning difficulties and/or disabilities into employment. The advice has been designed to provide a comprehensive introduction to supported internships and to allow users to dip into individual sections of particular interest. It is divided into broad sections which include: planning and designing supported internships; job coaching; recruiting and engaging interns; working with parents and carers; working with employers; achieving positive progression; and funding. (Edited publisher abstract)

Journal article

Home on the range

Author:
SURRIDGE Mark
Journal article citation:
Learning Disability Today, 13(2), March/April 2013, pp.26-27.
Publisher:
Pavilion
Place of publication:
Hove

MINT, a job coaching scheme in Norwich, works with young people aged between 16 and 25-years-old who have learning disabilities, mental health problems, low academic skills or other barriers to work. The scheme provides training for young people and also works to build and maintain good relationships with local employers. The article describes how MINT work and provides details of one of their success stories where a young man with learning disabilities secured paid work in the retail sector. (Original abstract)

Journal article

Dr Tulp attends the soft machine: patient simulators, user involvement and intellectual disability

Authors:
McCLIMENS Alex, LEWIS Robin, BREWSTER Jacqui
Journal article citation:
Journal of Intellectual Disabilities, 16(3), September 2012, pp.173-182.
Publisher:
Sage
Place of publication:
London

Simulation may be seen as an effective educational strategy to address the growing moral and ethical issues around ‘practising’ on human patients. Patient simulators are very useful when the student learner needs to practise invasive techniques on an unconscious patient. Simulation works much less well where the technology is unable to replicate the ‘bio-fidelity’ associated with real life situations. For example, the utility of simulation models rapidly diminishes when the patient is conscious and has communication difficulties, and when the clinical interventions are more ‘social’ in nature. The article argues that patient simulation is of limited use for some patient populations such as people with intellectual disability and with a wide range of impairment, communication and mobility issues. Students must be able to see beyond the equipment and connect their learning to actual human beings.

Journal article

Commentary on “Human rights training: impact on attitudes and knowledge”

Author:
KIDD Jo
Journal article citation:
Tizard Learning Disability Review, 17(2), 2012, pp.88-91.
Publisher:
Emerald

This paper seeks to provide a commentary on the previous paper by Michelle Redman et al in this journal issue. Redman investigated the impact of a particular approach to human rights training on the knowledge and attitudes of a group of support staff in the health service. The results suggested that this training had a significant effect on knowledge about human rights but very little effect on attitudes towards human rights. This commentary poses the question as to whether human rights training can have an effect on attitudes towards human rights and, if so, which approach is the most effective. It outlines the distinction between 2 different types of approach to human rights training: one that assumes that the concept of human rights already runs through the work of public service providers; and the other that suggests that human rights training should challenge pre-existing beliefs and assumptions. The commentary suggests that the second of these approaches, the ‘activist’ approach, would go further towards winning hearts and minds. Suggestions on the kind of training needed to change people’s attitudes are provided, and underline the importance of the need for people with learning disabilities to have the space to tell their own stories.

Journal article

Transforming staff practice through active support

Authors:
RICHES Vivenne C., et al
Journal article citation:
Journal of Intellectual and Developmental Disability, 36(3), September 2011, pp.156-166.
Publisher:
Informa Healthcare

The active support model is being introduced in many residential and respite homes worldwide. It aims to increase the opportunities for the participation of people with intellectual disability (ID) in meaningful activity with appropriate assistance from staff. This article describes the development and delivery of an active support training pilot for staff in a large government organisation that supports people with ID in Australia. A train-the-trainer approach was used in which 5 apprentice trainers were trained to provide active support training to 65 staff associated with 6 group homes. These 5 trainers were then monitored to provide training to 54 staff in another 6 group homes. Staff evaluated their interactive training experiences by completing an anonymous questionnaire. In addition, pre and post outcome data were collected for a small number of service users from group homes, along with staff outcome data regarding residential working practices, group home management, and staffing practices. The findings show that the train-the-trainer model was an effective strategy for training large numbers of staff. The interactive training component was particularly effective and was associated with improvements in service user engagement in domestic tasks and decreased depression levels. Staff job satisfaction increased and significant improvements were recorded in residential working practices.

Journal article

Off to work

Author:
CLARK Linzi
Journal article citation:
Learning Disability Today, April 2011, pp.36-37.
Publisher:
Pavilion
Place of publication:
Hove

The Supported Employment Team at Bradford District Care Trust provides training for people with learning disabilities to help them gain employment and challenges the negative attitudes of employers. This article reports on their work and the people they have helped.

Journal article

Good sexual health and relationships

Author:
DE LA FEUNTE Miguel Tudela
Journal article citation:
Learning Disability Today, 10(9), November 2010, pp.26-28.
Publisher:
Pavilion
Place of publication:
Hove

In 2009, the City of Westminster and the local NHS set up the Good Sexual Health and Relationships project in order to provide support and information on sex and relationships to people with learning disabilities. The project is being run by the sexual health charity, the Family Planning Association (FPA). The initiative develops people’s sexuality and sexual identity and supports them to take part in adult relationships in a safe environment. This is achieved through individual and group programmes. The project also trains staff working to support the sexual needs of their clients with learning disabilities. In addition, it gives information and support to the parents and carers of adults attending, or thinking of attending, the course. Education about sexuality, sexual health and relationships makes people feel more empowered to make decisions and give consent to sexual relationships as they have a better understanding about what they are able to consent to and with whom. Other benefits are that it makes people less vulnerable to abuse, less in danger of abusing others, and less likely to have unwanted pregnancies or contract sexually transmitted infections.

Journal article

Lead on!

Authors:
DAVIES Jill, BURKE Christine
Journal article citation:
Learning Disability Today, 10(8), October 2010, pp.26-27.
Publisher:
Pavilion
Place of publication:
Hove

People with learning disabilities have been encouraged to take up leadership roles through the development of local partnership boards and self-advocacy groups. This article describes a programme led by the Foundation for People with Learning Disabilities to help people with learning disabilities become leaders. The Learning for Leadership programme empowers participants to develop their leadership skills and learn how they can make real change happen. The programme has been run in Wales, Cornwall and Kent. In each area local leaders with a learning disability have coordinated the workshops alongside staff from the Foundation. The programme is highly interactive and personalised with group work, role-play, DVD clips and engaging in real life situations. The outcomes from the programme have ranged from better opportunities in gaining employment, being more confident is speaking up in public, and becoming more politically aware.

Journal article

Skills for support: personal assistants and people with learning disabilities

Authors:
WILLIAMS Val, et al
Journal article citation:
British Journal of Learning Disabilities, 38(1), March 2010, pp.59-67.
Publisher:
Wiley-Blackwell

For people with learning disabilities to have control over their lives, the quality of their support staff matters. This paper reports on an inclusive research study, which used video analysis to study the communication skills of personal assistants (PAs) who worked with people with learning disabilities. The findings reveal some of the fine detail in the strategies these PAs used, to show respect, support choices, and give advice. They were able to step back, to listen and observe the person with learning disabilities, and to use good, open body language. They also gave people time, built up a close relationship based on shared interests and activities, and they talked with people in a friendly, adult way. It is difficult to support people to manage their lives, and team work is important. People with learning disabilities also have to play their role in the relationship. This research produced training materials that will help people with learning disabilities to train and support their own PAs.

Journal article

Calling the shots

Author:
BALDWIN Michele
Journal article citation:
Learning Disability Today, 9(5), July 2009, pp.26-27.
Publisher:
Pavilion
Place of publication:
Hove

A three year project run by the Association for Real Change (ARC) has trained 12 people with learning disabilities to become trainers. The article summarises the training and learning points from the project.

Key to icons

  • Free resource Free resource
  • Journal article Journal article
  • Book Book
  • Digital media Digital media
  • Journal Journal

Give us your feedback

Social Care Online continues to be developed in response to user feedback.

Contact us with your comments and for any problems using the website.

Sign up/login for more

Register/login to use standard search filters, access resource links, advanced search and email alerts