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Journal article

Transition into adulthood and work - findings from Network 1000

Authors:
PAVEY Sue, DOUGLAS Graeme, CORCORAN Christine
Journal article citation:
British Journal of Visual Impairment, 26(2), May 2008, pp.202-216.
Publisher:
Sage

This article draws upon data from a large scale project called 'Network 1000'. Network 1000 seeks to survey the changing needs and opinions of visually impaired adults. Data have been collected from 1007 visually impaired people across Great Britain. This analysis focuses upon a sub-sample of approximately 250 adults aged between 18 and 42 years. In all cases, the onset of these participants' visual impairment was during childhood (i.e. under 17 years of age). The analysis presents data in relation to their education and employment, and reflects upon the factors that seem to be associated with both. It appears that earlier onset of visual impairment is associated with higher levels of educational achievement. There was no clear link between the current level of visual impairment (at the time of interview) and educational achievement. In terms of employment, those with higher levels of educational qualification were more likely to be employed. Those with lower levels of qualifications were more likely to describe themselves as 'long term sick and disabled' or 'unemployed'. Some time is also spent considering visually impaired adults with severe learning and communication difficulties and their lives following compulsory education, including possible explanations for their likely under-representation in the project sample.

Journal article

The International Family Quality of Life project: goals and description of a survey tool

Authors:
ISAACS Barry J, et al
Journal article citation:
Journal of Policy and Practice in Intellectual Disabilities, 4(3), September 2007, pp.177-185.
Publisher:
Wiley

The International Family Quality of Life Project, begun in 1997, involves the collaboration of a team of researchers from Australia, Canada, Israel, and the United States whose aim was to conceptualize "family quality of life" and develop a survey tool. The authors describe the basis for the conceptualization and explain the survey development process. An initial version of the survey (the Family Quality of Life Survey—FQoLS-2000) was used to collect FQoL data across several countries in the early 2000s. The experiences of survey respondents and administrators and subsequent data analysis suggested modifications that resulted in an updated version—the FQoLS-2006. This new version focuses on 9 areas of family life: health, finances, family relationships, support from other people, support from disability-related services, influence of values, careers and planning for careers, leisure and recreation, and community interaction. The authors explore each of these areas in relation to 6 underlying concepts: importance, opportunities, initiative, attainment, stability, and satisfaction. Other sections entail obtaining information on the family make-up, family member, or members, with intellectual disability, and an overall summary of FQoL. The authors note that information from the FQoLS-2006 should be useful for a wide variety of purposes related to providing supports to individuals and families.

Journal article

Identifying children with developmental disabilities receiving child protection services: a national survey of child welfare administrators

Authors:
SHANNON Patrick, AGORASTOU Maria
Journal article citation:
Families in Society, 87(3), July 2006, pp.351-357.
Publisher:
The Alliance for Children and Families

The purpose of this study was to examine the ability of U.S. state child protection service (CPS) agencies to identify children with developmental disabilities who have been maltreated and provide them with services to meet their unique needs. The subjects were 50 state-level child welfare administrators (including the District of Columbia) who were knowledgeable about the data collections requirements in their states. The findings of this study are presented and compared with data collected from two previous studies. Findings indicate that less than one-half of state child welfare agencies identify children with developmental disabilities. The implications of the findings highlight the need for improved data collection procedures, staff and foster care family training regarding disabilities, and improved collaboration with traditional developmental disability-related providers.

Journal article Full text available online for free

Estimating the number of people with intellectual disabilities in 'out of area' residential placements

Authors:
MANSELL Jim, et al
Journal article citation:
Research Policy and Planning, 24(1), 2006, pp.53-59.
Publisher:
Social Services Research Group

Out of area placement of people with intellectual disabilities is a potential problematic practice. In this study every care home in a large English county was surveyed to find out the number of people placed by other authorities. Information was cross-checked by asking three placing authorities for information about everyone they had placed in residential care in the county. The survey identified 759 people placed by other authorities in homes in the county. Cross-checking suggested that only about half to two thirds of placements were being identified. Residents included all age groups, a disproportional number of men and were mainly placed for long-term care. between 30 and 54 per cent had not been contacted by their care managers for at least a year. It seem likely that between 1,000 and 1,400 people were placed by other authorities in this country, occupying 30 to 40 per cent of all residential placements. This figure does not include placement in health facilities or 'supporting people' placements. The number of people placed by other authorities seems likely to pose a considerable extra demand for health and social care services.

Journal article

Retirement or just a change of pace: an Australian national survey of disability day services used by older people with disabilities

Authors:
BIGBY Christine, et al
Journal article citation:
Journal of Intellectual and Developmental Disability, 29(3), September 2004, pp.239-254.
Publisher:
Taylor and Francis

Definitions of old age selected by researchers should reflect differences in culture and life expectancy within and between developing and developed nations. Fifty-five years was used to denote older people in both the Australian national survey and a Victorian study. Consequently, 55 years and older has been used to denote older people in this study. people with a lifelong disability are discussed. A postal survey of 596 day programmes for people with disabilities was conducted, with a response rate of 28%. Findings show that only 19% of service users were aged over 55, and the largest subgroup were people with intellectual disability. Many older people attended programs that were not age specific and a typology of the seven program types utilised was constructed. Individualised planning, flexibility and choice were perceived as fundamental to a successful program. The location of activities in the community, maintenance of social relationships, and opportunities to develop new contacts were also seen as important. Little understanding, however, of the diversity of the ageing process or notions of healthy ageing was demonstrated by service providers, many of whom had limited expectations of older people. Challenges identified in providing day support for older people were lack of financial resources, knowledge and expertise amongst staff, and difficulties interfacing with other service systems.

Journal article

Does size matter? or staffing levels or costs?

Author:
FELCE David
Journal article citation:
Llais, 67, Winter 2003, pp.3-7.
Publisher:
Learning Disability Wales

Describes recent work which has sought to understand why quality of life in staffed community group homes varies. A sample of 51 houses in Wales accommodating 6 or fewer people were surveyed. The survey particularly looked at staff-service user rations and costs; size related to cost; and provider agency.

Journal article

Secure care and treatment needs of individuals with learning disability and severe challenging behaviour

Author:
VAUGHAN Phillip
Journal article citation:
British Journal of Learning Disabilities, 31(3), September 2003, pp.113-117.
Publisher:
Wiley

Reports on a survey undertaken within the catchment area of the Wessex Consortium (population 1.8 million) to identify the number of individuals with learning disabilities and challenging behaviour who were placed in or needed to be placed in secure care. Twenty-nine men and six women were identified, the majority of whom were in out-of-area placements. Argues that there is a need to develop a local long-stay secure service offering a range of security measures and focusing on individuals who exhibit problems of violence and sexually inappropriate behaviour. Consideration should be given to providing small domestic style functional units as the preferred model of provision with a separate facility for a small number of women. The service should also be closely integrated with local community learning disability services.

Journal article

Enhancing quality of life

Author:
MAUDSLAY Liz
Journal article citation:
Soundtrack, 26, February 2003, pp.4-5.
Publisher:
National Development Team

Reports on a three year action research programme, jointly initiated by Skill: National Bureau for Students with Disabilities and the University of Cambridge, investigating the education provision available to people with severe learning disabilities after the age of 16.

Journal article

Research into practice

Author:
FOSKETT Andy
Journal article citation:
Community Care, 1.8.02, 2002, p.49.
Publisher:
Reed Business Information

Looks at research into the implementation of 'No Secrets', the government guidance on the protection of vulnerable adults.

Journal article

A need for consistency: policy response to crime and abuse against people with learning disabilities

Authors:
EVANS Jane, WILLIAMS Christopher
Journal article citation:
Journal of Adult Protection, 3(1), February 2001, pp.15-24.
Publisher:
Emerald

Using data from a survey of social services departments, this paper looks at how local authorities are addressing the needs of people with learning disabilities for protection from crime and abuse within the context of adult protection developments. Previous research indicated that victimisation of this group was less likely to be treated seriously by key agencies. Here, the situation is reassessed.

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