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Journal article

Adulthood and people with mental handicaps: report of a research project

Author:
WALMSLEY Jan
Journal article citation:
Mental Handicap Research, 4(2), 1991, pp.141-154.
Publisher:
BIMH Publications

Describes a small project which used research interviews to discover the meaning of adulthood to the research participants, five adults with mental handicaps. The project set out to design a research process which would respect their status as adults. The paper focuses on the research process, and the merits and difficulties of the approach are discussed in the context of research methodologies which emphasise the need to redress the power imbalance inherent in more traditional methods.

Book

The social cost and rewards of caring

Author:
CLIFFORD Dermott
Publisher:
Avebury
Publication year:
1990
Pagination:
267p.,tables,bibliogs.
Place of publication:
Aldershot

A study of social services in relation to carers in Ireland, focusing on the Kerry area. Includes a literature review and an outline of study methods, and goes on to look more closely at carers of elderly people and mentally handicapped people. Explores the motivations of carers, and asks what positive experiences might be associated with long-term caring. Compares the Irish setting with similar studies in Britain, and the plight of female carers with male carers. Based on 76 case studies, outlined in an appendix.

Journal article

Employers' attitudes to the employment of people with mental handicaps: an empirical study

Authors:
HARRISON Barbara, TOMES Anne
Journal article citation:
Mental Handicap Research, 3(2), 1990, pp.196-213.
Publisher:
BIMH Publications

Based on interviews with 57 employers in Sheffield, investigating attitudes, perceptions, and practices of employers in relation to the employment of people with mental handicaps.

Journal article

Babies and mental handicap : getting it right for parents

Author:
WATKINSON M.
Journal article citation:
Social Work Today, 5.1.89, 1989, p.30.
Publisher:
British Association of Social Workers

Takes a critical look at a CMH survey of support to parents with mentally handicapped babies.

Journal article

Services for parents of children attending special schools: a review of local support

Author:
LINTER C.M.
Journal article citation:
Mental Handicap, 15(2), 1987, pp.71-73.
Publisher:
British Institute of Mental Handicap

Summarises parents' comments elicited by questionnaire.

Book

Working in a comprehensive community based service for mentally handicapped people: a survey of the staff of the NIMROD service

Authors:
EVANS Gerry., et al
Publisher:
Mental Handicap in Wales. Applied Research Unit
Publication year:
1984
Pagination:
65p., tables, bibliog.
Place of publication:
Cardiff
Journal article Full text available online for free

Maximising engagement and participation of intellectual disability staff in research: insights from conducting a UK-wide survey

Authors:
LAM Claire Kar Kei, et al
Journal article citation:
Journal of Intellectual Disabilities, 25(4), 2021, pp.554-566.
Publisher:
Sage
Place of publication:
London

Aim: This article explores ways of maximising engagement of intellectual disability staff as research participants, research advisers and research implementers. Method: The authors describe and reflect on a three-phased strategy in recruiting front-line staff (n = 690) working for intellectual disability service providers (n = 25) to participate in a UK-wide anonymous online survey about death, dying and bereavement. Results: Important elements in engaging participants were: involving stakeholders at all stages of the research process, which includes: building relationships with participating organisations; enlisting organisational management support at all levels; an attractive and well laid-out collection tool; a well-structured recruitment strategy; time and flexibility; and a varied and targeted dissemination strategy. However, the recruitment method had limitations, in particular around representativeness, bias and generalisability. Conclusions: Staff in intellectual disability services can be enthusiastic and invaluable research participants. Active engagement between researchers, participating organisations and stakeholder groups is key to ensuring involvement of intellectual disability staff with research. (Edited publisher abstract)

Journal article

The experience of COVID-19 “lockdown” for people with a learning disability: results from surveys in Jersey and Guernsey

Authors:
PEACOCK-BRENNAN Sinead, et al
Journal article citation:
Tizard Learning Disability Review, 26(3), 2021, pp.121-129.
Publisher:
Emerald

Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to outline a service evaluation that gathered feedback from people with a learning disability on their experience of lockdown in Jersey and Guernsey. This feedback was intended to guide planning for service provision during any future lockdown and for life as we exit lockdown. Design/methodology/approach: An accessible survey was sent to everyone accessing learning disability services across the two islands and Mencap in Jersey. Data was analysed quantitatively and qualitatively to identify patterns in the data and key themes. Findings: Most respondents felt safe, calm and happy and valued support from services. Key themes emerging from the data included the importance of relationships, messages of safety, keeping busy and communication. Originality/value: This survey has been undertaken at a time where there is a paucity of research and consultation with individuals with a learning disability self-reporting on their experiences of lockdown, during the COVID-19 pandemic. (Edited publisher abstract)

Book Full text available online for free

The hidden costs of support: experiences of family carers who support someone with learning disabilities

Authors:
BLOOD Lauren, COONEY Geraldine
Publisher:
National Development Team for Inclusion
Publication year:
2020
Pagination:
32
Place of publication:
Bath

Findings from a survey to explore the role and input of family carers, to determine how much time and money family carers typically spend providing support to their relative, and to assess the broader impact on the family carer. The findings show a considerable input from family carers, of both money and time, in the areas of coordinating support, providing practical support, supporting their relative’s health and community involvement. However, there were minimal differences between supported living and residential care and the housing model appeared to have little impact on the amount of support that family carers provided. As expected, family carers whose relative lived at home with them spent significantly more time providing practical support than those whose relative lived outside of the family home. The extensive comments provided by family carers revealed additional impacts on all areas of their lives, beyond time and money. These included impacts on their health, career and relationships. Respondents highlighted that the stress associated with liaising with, and navigating, services on the behalf of their relatives was a huge strain. These difficulties led to family carers having significant anxiety about the future. Parents in particular were worried about who would look after their relative as they age and become incapable of caring, particularly in the event of their death. As they were overseeing and coordinating their relative’s care, there was a fear that support arrangements would fall apart without them. (Edited publisher abstract)

Journal article Full text available online for free

Commonalities and differences in social work with learning disability and child protection: findings from a UK ‘burnout’ national survey

Authors:
McFADDEN Paula, MANTHORPE Gillian, MALLETT John
Journal article citation:
British Journal of Social Work, 48(5), 2018, pp.1199-1219.
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

Social work with adults with learning disabilities or intellectual disability may be organised as a discrete or specialist area of practice in the UK. Little is known about contemporary social work practitioners’ views of their work with adults with learning disabilities and whether these differ from those of social workers in practice with different user groups or working in other specialities. This paper reports findings from a national survey of UK social workers undertaken in 2015 that measured burnout using the Maslach Burnout Inventory, across three domains: Emotional Exhaustion (EE), depersonalisation and personal accomplishment. A total of 1,359 social workers responded to the invitation to participate, of whom seventy-seven reported predominantly working with adults with learning disabilities and 358 reported working in child protection social work. Comparisons are drawn between responses from social workers working in these distinct practice areas showing high levels of EE co-existing with high levels of personal accomplishment in both areas of practice. Other important distinctions and similarities are reported. (Edited publisher abstract)

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