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Journal article

The sexual abuse of adults with learning disabilities: results of a two-year incidence survey

Authors:
TURK Vicky, BROWN Hilary
Journal article citation:
Mental Handicap Research, 6(3), 1993, pp.193-216.
Publisher:
BIMH Publications

Reports the results of the largest survey to date of the sexual abuse of adults with learning disabilities. Existing knowledge is reviewed in the light of complex methodological and definition issues that exist and limit any work undertaken. The few existing studies of sexual abuse of adults with learning disabilities are described. Details of the current survey of sexual abuse carried out by the University of Kent and funded by the Rowntree Foundation are then provided. Details results of the survey are presented followed by a discussion of their implications and comparability with previous research.

Journal article

A consumer survey of adults with learning disabilities currently doing work experience: their satisfaction with work and wishes for the future

Authors:
SHANLY Angela, ROSE John
Journal article citation:
Mental Handicap Research, 6(3), 1993, pp.250-262.
Publisher:
BIMH Publications

Reports on research into the attitudes of eighteen people with learning disabilities at a day centre in Oxford towards their work experience programme, and their preference for full-time or part-time work. The research design incorporated a number of open-ended, yes/no and either/or questions in order to reduce the problems of acquiescence and inconsistency often found when interviewing people with learning disabilities.

Journal article

Loneliness and social competence among preadolescents and adolescents with mild mental retardation

Authors:
MARGALIT Malka, RONEN Tammie
Journal article citation:
Mental Handicap Research, 6(2), 1993, pp.97-111.
Publisher:
BIMH Publications

Reports on a study whose findings demonstrated that in comparison to the younger group, adolescents received a more reserved acceptance by their peers, although they reported themselves to feel less lonely and showed higher rates of social competence in terms of less behaviour maladjustment and higher empathy and self-control skills.

Journal article

An abuse of power

Author:
BROWN Hilary
Journal article citation:
Community Care, 29.10.92, 1992, pp.15-17.
Publisher:
Reed Business Information

A study by the author reveals the extent of abuse of adults with learning difficulties. Considers how staff should be guided in dealing with it.

Book

What we need: a survey of the needs of families caring for a member with a mental handicap in Kidderminster Health District

Authors:
KIDDERMINSTER AND DISTRICT COMMUNITY HEALTH COUNCIL, KIDDERMINSTER AND DISTRICT HEALTH AUTHORITY
Publisher:
Kidderminster and District Community Health Council/Kidderminster and District H
Publication year:
1991
Pagination:
71p.,tables,bibliog.
Place of publication:
Kidderminster

Results of a survey of the needs of 136 families.

Journal article

Respite care services for adults with mental handicaps: a survey of carers' views

Author:
MITCHELL F.
Journal article citation:
Mental Handicap, 18(1), March 1990, pp.33-34.
Publisher:
British Institute of Mental Handicap

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Journal article

Happier in the community

Authors:
JONES C., BASSETT S.
Journal article citation:
Health Service Journal, 5.5.88, 1988, p.510.
Publisher:
Emap Healthcare

A survey in Gwent HA examined the quality of life of mentally handicapped people living in the community.

Journal article

Family-centered practices in home-based support for families with children with an intellectual disability: judgments of parents and professionals

Authors:
VANDERKERKEN Lien, et al
Journal article citation:
Journal of Intellectual Disabilities, 25(3), 2021, pp.331-347.
Publisher:
Sage
Place of publication:
London

Background: The realization of the family-centered approach (FCA) in home-based support (HBS) for families with children with an intellectual disability (ID) in Flanders was investigated, and parents’ and family workers’ perspectives were compared. The relation between parents’ educational level, the family worker’s education, and his/her experience in HBS; and parents’ and family workers’ judgments on the realization of the FCA was considered. Method: Parents (N = 58 families) and family workers (N = 46) completed the helpgiving practices scale and the enabling practices scale. Results:The FCA was largely present, parents rated its realization higher than family workers. Considering family workers’ answers, parents’ educational level appeared an important factor for parental autonomy. Conclusions: The study confirms recent research on the realization of the FCA. Including different perspectives, a nuanced view on the realization of the FCA was obtained. Further research on the concrete meaning, interpretation, and elaboration of the FCA is needed. (Edited publisher abstract)

Journal article

Feasibility of the Participatory Experience Survey and the Setting Affordances Survey for use in evaluation of programmes serving youth with intellectual and developmental disabilities

Authors:
LILJENQUIST K., et al
Journal article citation:
Child: Care, Health and Development, 43(4), 2017, pp.511-517.
Publisher:
Wiley

Background: Participation by youth with disabilities in recreational activities has been shown to promote the development of important skills needed for transition to adulthood. The Participatory Experience Survey (PES) and the Setting Affordances Survey (SAS) were developed for use by recreational programmes serving youth with significant intellectual and developmental disabilities (SIDD) to assess participant experiences and ensure that participants are afforded optimal opportunities to develop these skills. This paper presents a feasibility evaluation to determine the appropriateness of the PES and the SAS for use in a programme evaluation context. Method: The PES and the SAS were used to evaluate a programme serving youth with SIDD in the greater northwest region of the United States. Three recreational activities were evaluated: an art project, trip to a zoo and a track practice. Programme volunteers used the SAS to assess opportunities and affordances offered within each activity. The PES was then given to 10 young people in each activity to capture their experiences. It was hypothesised that each setting would afford different experiences and developmental opportunities because of the differing nature of the activities. Results: The PES and SAS were found to be feasible for conducting a programme evaluation. All three settings offered varying types of experiences and affordances. Notably, as measured by the SAS, opportunity for skill development was greater in more structured activities; the zoo had the fewest opportunities for skill development and the art project had the most skill development opportunities. Youth answered ‘no’ most often to ‘asking for help’ and ‘helping a kid’, suggesting changes to offer more opportunities to develop these skills would be beneficial in all three activities. Conclusion: These new instruments offer programmes a means to more fully include young people with disabilities during programme evaluations, leading to better-structured, more supportive programmes. (Edited publisher abstract)

Book Full text available online for free

Helping people with a learning disability to give feedback

Author:
NHS ENGLAND
Publisher:
NHS England
Publication year:
2017
Pagination:
6
Place of publication:
Redditch

This guide explains how, with the right support, people with a learning disability can have their say about the NHS. Support for people to give feedback includes: including people with a learning disability in feedback and engagement work; tapping in to local networks and voluntary organisations to ensure a larger number of people with a learning disability can be reached; ensuring information and questions presented as part of a survey or other feedback initiatives are easy to understand; involving people with a learning disability in designing and running feedback events so that they become more engaging and effective sessions; and ensuring people feel more empowered during any event where they are encouraged to have their say about healthcare. (Edited publisher abstract)

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