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Journal article

Jobs for the boys - and girls

Author:
CANHAM Kathy
Journal article citation:
Learning Disability Today, December 2008, pp.16-18.
Publisher:
Pavilion
Place of publication:
Hove

The Realistic Opportunities for Supported Employment (ROSE) project run by Havering College in Essex places people with learning disabilities into paid employment and supports them until they feel able to hold down the job. ROSE has an 80% success rate. This article looks at how the project works.

Journal article

Supported employment for people with learning disabilities: the case of full-time work

Author:
McINALLY George
Journal article citation:
Tizard Learning Disability Review, 13(3), October 2008, pp.42-46.
Publisher:
Emerald

North Lanarkshire Council's supported employment has achieved a reputation for delivering full-time work for people who have learning disabilities. Since 1999, the service has accessed 175 jobs, and current supports 127 individuals who work more than 16 hours a week. This article describes how the approach taken by North Lanarkshire can be adopted by other authorities.

Journal article

Chopping and changing

Author:
-
Journal article citation:
Viewpoint, May 2008, pp.30-31.
Publisher:
Mencap/Gateway

Chopsticks is a not-for-profit supported employment scheme in Northallerton that converts wood that no-one else wants and sells it on to local business and people as a carbon-neutral source of fuel. This article presents an overview of the enterprise with employs people with learning disabilities.

Book Full text available online for free

Good for business: the benefits of employing people with a learning disability

Author:
MENCAP
Publisher:
MENCAP
Publication year:
2017
Pagination:
16
Place of publication:
London

A guide for employers outlining the business case for employing people with a learning disability. The paper sets out the economic benefits of employing people with a learning disability and the evidence on their work performance and employment costs, looking at willingness and ability to work and reliability. It suggests that championing inclusion can help boost staff morale, which can have a positive contribution on the work output of an organisation. In addition, employing people with a learning disability can promote diversity in the workplace and can help a company to maintain a positive reputation for corporate social responsibility. The document also describes Mencap supported employment services, which provide tailored support throughout the entire process – from recruitment through to on-the-job support and beyond. (Edited publisher abstract)

Journal article

Cleaning up

Author:
PARTON Dan
Journal article citation:
Learning Disability Today, 15(1), January 2015, pp.26-27.
Publisher:
Pavilion
Place of publication:
Hove

The Chartity Hft runs two environmentally friendly car cleaning services in Gloucester and Stroud, which help young people with learning disabilities develop vital job skills in paid employment. The initiative offers work experience for up to 12 weeks for one day a week. Although the work experience is unpaid, a job coach works alongside the young person throughout this time. Individuals can then apply for vacancies as they arise. The long term goal is to offer NVQs in customer service skills and other qualifications to their employees. (Original abstract)

Book Full text available online for free

Supported internships

Author:
GREAT BRITAIN. Department for Education
Publisher:
Great Britain. Department for Education
Publication year:
2014
Pagination:
63
Place of publication:
London

This guide explains what supported internships are and why they have been introduced. It also provides practical advice on developing, implementing and delivering supported internships, including information on funding, programme design, staffing, and the various partnerships on which supported internships are founded. The advice draws heavily on the experiences of the 15 colleges who took part in the 2012/13 supported internship trial set up by the Department for Education. It also draws on the experiences of other providers who have been running programmes to support young people with learning difficulties and/or disabilities into employment. The advice has been designed to provide a comprehensive introduction to supported internships and to allow users to dip into individual sections of particular interest. It is divided into broad sections which include: planning and designing supported internships; job coaching; recruiting and engaging interns; working with parents and carers; working with employers; achieving positive progression; and funding. (Edited publisher abstract)

Journal article

A star with the cars

Author:
PARTON Dan
Journal article citation:
Learning Disability Today, 14(1), January/February 2014, pp.26-27.
Publisher:
Pavilion
Place of publication:
Hove

This article looks at how one young man, Michael, was able to secure employment with the support of the learning disability charity, Norwood. First Michael gained experience at Norwood Future Clean, a car wash and valet service run by Norwood supported employment programme. He was then able to move on employment at car dealership with some initial support from the charity Norwood. (Original abstract)

Journal article

People with learning disabilities and microenterprise

Authors:
REDDINGTON Tess, FITZSIMONS Janet
Journal article citation:
Tizard Learning Disability Review, 18(3), 2013, pp.124-131.
Publisher:
Emerald

This paper examine the outcomes for people with learning disabilities who run microenterprises, and consider how microenterprise might provide an alternative to day centre, training provision, conventional volunteering, or paid employment. It explores and examines the barriers to enterprise and how learning-disabled entrepreneurs can best be supported to achieve success. Views were sought from entrepreneurs with learning disabilities, support workers, health and social care professionals, and family members to understand what worked and what didn’t work, and to consider if microenterprises are a viable alternative to more traditional activities for people with learning disabilities. The article aims to contribute to the body of knowledge that exists in this field, and is executed with a view to sharing best practice. Whilst the study sought to investigate all aspects of people with a learning disability working in a microenterprise, the authors recognise that there is a tendency in such cases for only those with a positive experience to come forward. (Edited publisher abstract)

Journal article Full text available online for free

Support on the job

Author:
LITTLE Mathew
Journal article citation:
Children and Young People Now, 24.7.12, 2012, pp.22-23.
Publisher:
Haymarket Business Publications Ltd

Young people with special educational needs seeking jobs often come up against reluctant or inflexible employers. The Realistic Opportunities for Supported Employment Project (Rose) at Havering College of Further and Higher Education works with students with learning difficulties when they have finished Havering College courses, and actively seeks to find them paid employment. It uses job coaches to work alongside them in the first weeks of work. One young person explains how the Rose project has helped him. The article also draws parallels with the Rose project and the recently announced government supported internship pilot scheme.

Book

Personalisation and supported employment

Authors:
DAVIES Huw, MEILLING Kathy, WILSON Paul
Publisher:
British Association for Supported Employment
Publication year:
2012
Pagination:
50p.
Place of publication:
Tottington

For most people, employment is essential to gain a sense of engagement and fulfilment. However, for many people with learning disabilities who are actively seeking work, only a few actually have a job. Published jointly with the British Institute of Learning Disabilities (BILD), this guide sets out what the key issues around personalisation and supported employment are, particularly for people with a learning disability and people with autism. It describes the supported employment model and current funding streams that can be used. The guide explores some of the challenges for jobseekers and for supported employment providers and how these might be overcome.

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