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Journal article

Prosocial motivation, stress and burnout among direct support workers

Author:
HICKEY Robert
Journal article citation:
Journal of Applied Research in Intellectual Disabilities, 27(2), 2014, pp.134-144.
Publisher:
Wiley-Blackwell

Aim: This study explores whether the desire to engage in work that is beneficial to others moderates the effects of stress on burnout. Method: Based on a survey of 1570 direct support professionals in Ontario, this study conducted linear regression analyses and tested for the interaction effects of prosocial motivation on occupational stress and burnout. Results: Prosocial motivation significantly moderated the association of emotional exhaustion (EE) and role boundary stress with depersonalization (DP). Prosocial motivation also moderated the effects of role ambiguity stress with a direct support worker's sense of personal accomplishment. In contrast, prosocial motivation magnified feelings of EE when interacted with a sense of personal accomplishment. Conclusion: Prosocial motivation plays an important role in explaining the relatively low levels of DP in the sector. The study advances our understanding of the key components of burnout among direct support workers. (Publisher abstract)

Journal article

Factorial validity and consistency of the Maslach Burnout Inventory among staff working with persons with intellectual disability and dementia

Authors:
CHAO S.F., MCCALLION P., NICKLE T.
Journal article citation:
Journal of Intellectual Disability Research, 55(5), May 2011, pp.529-536.
Publisher:
Wiley

Despite the fact that direct care staff working in the intellectual disabilities (ID) field are thought to be particularly vulnerable to burnout, there has been comparatively little research on their specific situation. This study examined the psychometric properties and applicability to staff in ID services of one of the most widely used burnout measurements - the Human Services Survey version of the Maslach Burnout Inventory (MBI-HSS). A mailed survey was used to gather data from 435 staff delivering direct care and working in out-of-home community placements for persons with ID in New York State. Confirmatory factor analysis supported the MBI-HSS as an acceptable measure for evaluating burnout in ID services staff. However, the reliability statistics obtained for the Depersonalization (DP) sub-scale was much lower than that reported in studies with other staff populations. An exploratory factor analysis suggested that a four-factor solution, dividing the DP sub-scale into two factors, provided a better fit for the sample. The authors conclude that the use of the MBI-HHS as an instrument for measuring burnout among ID workers has attraction but also some limitations. In particular, the DP sub-scale should be used with caution because there appear to be wording issues for staff in ID settings that may lead to inconsistent responses.

Journal article

Levels of anxiety and sources of stress in adults with autism

Authors:
GILLOTT Alinda, STANDEN P.J.
Journal article citation:
Journal of Intellectual Disabilities, 11(4), December 2007, pp.359-370.
Publisher:
Sage
Place of publication:
London

Clinical reports suggest that anxiety is a pertinent issue for adults with autism. This study compared 34 adults with autism with 20 adults with intellectual disabilities, utilizing informant-based measures of anxiety and stress. Groups were matched by age, gender and intellectual ability. Adults with autism were almost three times more anxious than the comparison group and gained significantly higher scores on the anxiety subscales of panic and agoraphobia, separation anxiety, obsessive-compulsive disorder and generalized anxiety disorder. In terms of sources of stress, significant differences between the two groups were also found, and stress was found to correlate with high anxiety levels for the autism group, particularly the ability to cope with change, anticipation, sensory stimuli and unpleasant events. That is, the more anxious the individual with autism, the less likely they were able to cope with these demands. This has important implications for clinicians in terms of both assessment and treatment.

Journal article

A fair hearing

Author:
HOLLINGSWORTH Nicole
Journal article citation:
Nursing Times, 28.12.00, 2000, pp.41-42.
Publisher:
Nursing Times

Courtrooms can be frightening for people with a learning disability. Describes an initiative to provide them with support.

Journal article

Stress and the move into community accommodation

Authors:
BRAMSTON Paul, CUMMINS A. Robert
Journal article citation:
Journal of Intellectual and Developmental Disability, 23(4), December 1998, pp.295-308.
Publisher:
Informa Healthcare

The move into community-based supported accommodation for people with an intellectual disability can be exciting and rewarding but also confusing, demanding and perhaps even frightening. This study follows the concerns and stresses of four Australian people with an intellectual disability for five months as they negotiate the trials and rewards of moving out into a flat in the community, with only drop-in support. Implications are drawn from the data for those involved in supporting people with an intellectual disability to move into supported accommodation.

Journal article

Staff in services for people with learning disabilities: an overview of current issues

Authors:
HATTON Chris, EMERSON Eric
Journal article citation:
Mental Handicap Research, 8(4), 1996, pp.215-236.
Publisher:
BIMH Publications

Despite the obvious importance of high quality staff performance for achieving the aims of community care policy, it is only recently that attention in the UK has begun to be focussed on staffing issues in services for people with learning disabilities. Discusses possible reasons for this increase in activity and introduces the content of the issue - which concentrates on demonstrating the range of approaches currently being used in UK research concerning staff in-services for people with learning disabilities.

Journal article

Pressures can be good for you

Author:
HOLMAN Andrew
Journal article citation:
Community Living, 9(2), October 1995, p.20.
Publisher:
Hexagon Publishing

When working with people with learning difficulties argues that stress can be good for you.

Journal article

Stress and residential staff: towards an integration of existing research

Author:
ROSE John
Journal article citation:
Mental Handicap Research, 8(4), 1995, pp.220-236.
Publisher:
BIMH Publications

Examines the literature relating to stress in staff who care for people with learning disabilities. The majority of published studies have considered stress in residential staff. When assessing the studies, it soon becomes apparent that there is considerable variability between them in terms of methodology and results. However, the main reason for the range of results probably represent differences in organisational structure of the services surveyed. Despite this variability some simple general trends emerge which suggest that potential stressors and supports vary depending upon their proximity within the organisational structure. Models are presented on how these inter-relationships might be considered.

Journal article

Support, respect and value: the keys to high staff morale

Author:
HARRIS Philip
Journal article citation:
Community Living, October 1992, pp.12-13.
Publisher:
Hexagon Publishing

Reports on the establishment of a staff support group in a community-based service for people with challenging behaviour.

Book

Stress and coping in families caring for a child with severe mental handicap: a longitudinal study

Authors:
QUINE Lyn, PAHL Jan
Publisher:
University of Kent. Institute of Social and Applied Psychology
Publication year:
1989
Pagination:
238p., tables, bibliog.
Place of publication:
Canterbury

Second stage in a longitudinal study of 200 families caring for a severely mentally handicapped child,which includes analysis of behaviour problems, contact with professionals and services; and the transition to adult life.

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