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Journal article

Prosocial motivation, stress and burnout among direct support workers

Author:
HICKEY Robert
Journal article citation:
Journal of Applied Research in Intellectual Disabilities, 27(2), 2014, pp.134-144.
Publisher:
Wiley-Blackwell

Aim: This study explores whether the desire to engage in work that is beneficial to others moderates the effects of stress on burnout. Method: Based on a survey of 1570 direct support professionals in Ontario, this study conducted linear regression analyses and tested for the interaction effects of prosocial motivation on occupational stress and burnout. Results: Prosocial motivation significantly moderated the association of emotional exhaustion (EE) and role boundary stress with depersonalization (DP). Prosocial motivation also moderated the effects of role ambiguity stress with a direct support worker's sense of personal accomplishment. In contrast, prosocial motivation magnified feelings of EE when interacted with a sense of personal accomplishment. Conclusion: Prosocial motivation plays an important role in explaining the relatively low levels of DP in the sector. The study advances our understanding of the key components of burnout among direct support workers. (Publisher abstract)

Journal article

Staff characteristics and attitudes towards the sexuality of people with intellectual disability

Authors:
MEANEY-TAVARES Rebecca, GAVIDIA-PAYNE Susana
Journal article citation:
Journal of Intellectual and Developmental Disability, 37(3), September 2012, pp.269-273.
Publisher:
Informa Healthcare

People with learning disabilities often experience difficulties in correctly interpreting behavioural cues which may have detrimental outcomes with respect to their expression of sexuality. The identification of individual staff characteristics that have a relationship with specific attitudes of staff caring for people with learning disabilities may enable targeted training and better support. In this study, 66 participants from services for people with learning disabilities in metropolitan Melbourne, Australia, completed a survey, including the Attitudes to Sexuality Questionnaire. Findings revealed that staff attitudes towards the sexuality of people with learning disabilities were quite positive. Age, programme agency position, and training uptake were all associated with positive staff attitudes. The authors concluded that targeted training programmes in sexuality can benefit direct care workers in general and older staff more specifically. Implications for training and practice are discussed.

Journal article

We hope this is just the beginning

Author:
KIRKPATRICK Karyn
Journal article citation:
Learning Disability Today, November 2008, pp.26-27.
Publisher:
Pavilion
Place of publication:
Hove

KeyRing and Skillnet Group have developed an pilot initiative to raise awareness among prison staff to help to work more effectively with people with learning disabilities. This article discusses the pilot and plans for the future.

Digital Media

Understanding learning disabilities: a DVD-based training resource for trainers and managers to use with their staff

Authors:
MacKINNON Shelagh, BAILEY Barbara, PINK Lorna
Publisher:
Pavilion
Publication year:
2004
Pagination:
262p., DVD
Place of publication:
Brighton

Staff working in residential, day and domiciliary settings will all encounter learning disabilities, either in their own establishment or in establishments where clients are using the services, so they need to understand what is meant by the term "learning disability" and what they can do to lessen the impact of any disability. This workshop resource is designed for use with direct care staff and others who support or are involved with people with learning disabilities. The workshop can either be run in a single day or on a modular basis, and can be used to develop training to include staff in the statutory, voluntary and private sectors. This resource can be used for staff at varying levels as it will help staff to understand the wider service structures within which their own agency is located, and to appreciate their own and each other's roles. The video pack includes sessions on such subjects as attention, perception, memory, comprehension and coping with change.

Journal article

Staff training and challenging behaviour: who needs it?

Author:
CAMPBELL Martin
Journal article citation:
Journal of Intellectual Disabilities, 11(2), June 2007, pp.143-156.
Publisher:
Sage
Place of publication:
London

Staff working directly with people who have challenging behaviour in learning disability services need to be D good at what they do. These staff are trained by their employers to manage and to treat challenging behaviours and to improve the quality of life of people in their care. While such training is generally well evaluated by care staff, there is limited evidence that training alone changes poor attitudes or improves staff performance. Training has not been linked to quality of outcomes for service users. From research on treating challenging behaviour, achieving maintenance of behavioural gains after treatment has been discontinued is the exception rather than the rule. Can the same be said for maintaining gains achieved through staff training in the area of challenging behaviour? This discussion article reviews the value of training for staff working with people with challenging behaviour.

Book Full text available online for free

No one knows: identifying and supporting prisoners with learning difficulties and learning disabilities: the views of prison staff

Author:
TALBOT Jenny
Publisher:
Prison Reform Trust
Publication year:
2007
Pagination:
66p.
Place of publication:
London

No One Knows is a UK-wide programme led by the Prison Reform Trust that aims to effect change by exploring and publicising the experiences of people with learning difficulties and learning disabilities who come into contact with the criminal justice system. A preliminary report, identifying and supporting prisoners with learning difficulties and learning disabilities is the first in a series of reports and briefing papers from No One Knows. It covers preliminary findings on research undertaken into the views of prison staff on how prisoners with learning difficulties and learning disabilities are identified and supported.

Journal article

Sexuality: policies, beliefs and practice

Authors:
MURRAY J., MacDONALD R., LEVENSON V.
Journal article citation:
Tizard Learning Disability Review, 6(1), 2001, pp.29-35.
Publisher:
Emerald
Journal article

Vocabulary needs in augmentative and alternative communication: a sample of conversational topics between staff providing services to adults with learning difficulties and their service users

Author:
GRAVES Judy
Journal article citation:
British Journal of Learning Disabilities, 28(3), September 2000, pp.113-119.
Publisher:
Wiley-Blackwell

This paper describes an attempt to gather information about vocabulary needs of a sample of people with learning difficulties in order to inform the content of local augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) resources and training programmes. The participants were staff members working in a range of local day care and residential services who were asked to record topics of conversation in diaries. The results of the present study suggest that physical needs and function were the most frequent topic areas for conversation. There were far fewer conversations recorded for social and emotional topics. Flexible topic-based frameworks for AAC programmes are suggested as a model that might be able to respond to individual and local vocabulary needs more readily than any one prescribed vocabulary.

Journal article

A unique course producing thinking individuals

Authors:
RACE David, BOXALL Kathy
Journal article citation:
Community Living, 13(4), April 2000, pp.20-22.
Publisher:
Hexagon Publishing

Looks at a course at Stockport College, which adopts a social approach to work with people who have learning difficulties, and appears to be the only non-medical special training available at degree level.

Journal article

Staff in services for people with learning disabilities: an overview of current issues

Authors:
HATTON Chris, EMERSON Eric
Journal article citation:
Mental Handicap Research, 8(4), 1996, pp.215-236.
Publisher:
BIMH Publications

Despite the obvious importance of high quality staff performance for achieving the aims of community care policy, it is only recently that attention in the UK has begun to be focussed on staffing issues in services for people with learning disabilities. Discusses possible reasons for this increase in activity and introduces the content of the issue - which concentrates on demonstrating the range of approaches currently being used in UK research concerning staff in-services for people with learning disabilities.

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