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Journal article

That 'special' divide

Author:
STENNER Eve
Journal article citation:
Social Work Today, 12.10.89, 1989, p.24.
Publisher:
British Association of Social Workers

Reviews the legal framework of the 1981 Education Act on integration in schools.

Book

The encyclopedia of learning disabilities

Authors:
TURKINGTON Carol, HARRIS Joseph R., AMERICAN BOOKWORKS
Publisher:
Facts on File
Publication year:
2006
Pagination:
304p., bibliog.
Place of publication:
New York
Edition:
2nd ed.

This is a comprehensive guide to all types of learning disabilities, including how they function, how they can be diagnosed, and how they can be treated. Today, learning disabilities are becoming more and more common. With more than 650 entries, 25 of which are new, this thoroughly revised and updated volume explains all the relevant topics from special legislation to educational tools to child development. Appendixes listing important organizations, government information, sources, assistive technology resources, and relevant books and Web sites make this the most comprehensive handy reference on learning disabilities available.

Journal article

To be labelled, or not to be labelled: that is the question

Author:
HO Anita
Journal article citation:
British Journal of Learning Disabilities, 32(2), June 2004, pp.86-92.
Publisher:
Wiley-Blackwell

Discusses the dilemma of diagnosing and labelling learning disabled people. Argues that a commitment to inclusion and equality requires an acknowledgement of various categorization problems, and a realization that various contexts may contribute to people's different learning patterns. Pathologizing learning difference may be unnecessary or even counterproductive if we presume that all children learn in their unique ways. Argues that it is more productive to design flexible curricula that can accommodate learning diversity.

Book Full text available online for free

Length of school week: pupils in special schools and units

Author:
SCOTLAND. Scottish Executive. Education Department
Publisher:
Scotland. Scottish Executive
Publication year:
2002
Pagination:
5p.
Place of publication:
Edinburgh
Journal article

Characterisation of multisensory environments: why do teachers use them?

Author:
STEPHENSON Jennifer
Journal article citation:
Journal of Applied Research in Intellectual Disabilities, 15(1), 2002, pp.73-90.
Publisher:
Wiley-Blackwell

Special educators are increasingly using multisensory environments even though there is a lack of evidence for their effectiveness as an educational intervention. This paper explores the way multisensory rooms are presented on the World Wide Web in an attempt to understand why they are being used by teachers. Searches of the World Wide Web were carried out to locate 48 relevant sites. The contents of the sites were analyzed in terms of aims or purposes, purported benefits and outcomes, use of research, confidence of claims, emphasis on student behaviour and building interpersonal relationships. The aims included sensory stimulation and relaxation. A wide range of purported outcomes were identified that were confidently claimed with little reference to the existing research base. Many sites did claim benefits for student behaviour and building up of relationships. There is an uncritical presentation of the purported benefits of multisensory environments with a belief that sensory stimulation is, in itself, a good thing. It seems that a teacher's desire to build positive relationships and provide pleasant experiences may be an important factor in the use of these environments.

Book

Getting in on the act: provision for pupils with special educational needs; the national picture

Authors:
AUDIT COMMISSION, GREAT BRITAIN. Department of Education and Science
Publisher:
HMSO
Publication year:
1992
Pagination:
75p.,diags.
Place of publication:
London

Evaluates current provision and makes recommendations for improvements.

Journal article

An educational inconvenience

Author:
JONES Keith
Journal article citation:
Community Care, 3.1.91, 1991, p.7.
Publisher:
Reed Business Information

The Education Act 1981, which applied to children with learning difficulties or disabilities, set out to revolutionise the educational provision made for them by local education authorities. Radio 4's investigative programme Face the Facts has raised suspicions that LEAs are tailoring statements of need to fit what they can provide.

Book

Special educational needs: report of the Committee. H.M. Warnock, Chairman

Author:
COMMITTEE OF ENQUIRY INTO THE EDUCATION OF HANDICAPPED CHILDREN AND YOUNG PEOPLE
Publisher:
HMSO
Publication year:
1978
Place of publication:
London

Report of the Warnock Committee.

Journal article

Sociological theories of learning disabilities: understanding racial disproportionality in special education

Author:
ANYON Yolanda
Journal article citation:
Journal of Human Behavior in the Social Environment, 19(1), January 2009, pp.44-57.
Publisher:
Taylor and Francis
Place of publication:
Philadelphia, USA

In 2001 in the United States more than half of students in special education were identified as having specific learning disability more than any other qualifying disability. Although many researchers have applied sociological theory to concepts of physical disability, leading to the social model used by disability advocates and activists, less work has been done to provide a sociological frame for learning disabilities. This paper describes how students with learning disabilities have constituted the fastest-growing special education population in public school districts, particularly students of colour. Though the overrepresentation of students of colour in special education programmes is well documented, few efforts have been made to apply sociological theories to expand our understanding of this phenomenon. The author provides an overview of this application to the study of learning disabilities and special education, with particular attention to the disproportionate involvement of minority youth in educational programs for students with disabilities.

Journal article

Help to move on - but to what? Young people with learning difficulties moving on from out-of-area residential schools or colleges

Authors:
HESLOP Pauline, ABBOTT David
Journal article citation:
British Journal of Learning Disabilities, 37(1), March 2009, pp.12-20.
Publisher:
Wiley-Blackwell

This article describes research undertaken between 2004 and 2006 about the issues faced by 15 young people with a wide range of learning difficulties in out-of-area residential schools and colleges at transition. The process of transition planning was hampered by the distance between the school/college and the 'home authority' of the young person; there was a wide variation in who took the lead on co-ordinating planning for transition; and involvement in decision-making by the young people was often a passive, rather than active process. Four of the fifteen young people left their school/college without knowing where they were going to move on to. None moved into any accommodation other than the family home or residential accommodation. Half moved on to attend a mainstream FE college, with little or no sense of future progression into work for most. The key messages of the article relate to the importance of continuity to young people, the need for more creativity in minimising the effects of distance, and how vital good forward planning is to help young people 'move on'.

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