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Journal article

Effects of vocational training on a group of people with intellectual disabilities

Authors:
GOMES-MACHADO Maria Luiza, et al
Journal article citation:
Journal of Policy and Practice in Intellectual Disabilities, 13(1), 2016, pp.33-40.
Publisher:
Wiley-Blackwell

Intellectual disability (ID) is the most restraining disability for professional inclusion, mainly due to the lack of adaptive skills focused on the work environment observed in people with ID. The aims of this study were (i) to describe and analyse the effects of a vocational training program on the adaptive behaviour of people with ID and (ii) to evaluate the social impact of employability on the life of the employees with ID. Participants were 43 people with mild or moderate ID, age between 18 and 28 years. The Supports Intensity Scale was applied at two stages: T1-Pretraining and T2-Posttraining, while the Social Impact Questionnaire was used at the third stage, after employment (T3 Postinclusion). The authors found that there were differences in total scores between stages T1 and T2 in relation to all the adaptive skills assessed, with a reduction of around 50% in the need for support. One year after inclusion in the labour market (T3), participants were still employed, with significant improvements in such aspects as learning, autonomy, affective and social development, as well as in family and community relations. The vocational training contributed to the global development of persons, favouring their professional inclusion, and as a result, sustenance, autonomy, and a decrease in the need for assistance and support. (Edited publisher abstract)

Journal article

The empty rhetoric of inclusion

Author:
JACKSON Robin
Journal article citation:
Learning Disability Today, 15(3), May/June 2015, pp.22-24.
Publisher:
Pavilion
Place of publication:
Hove

The author argues that recent policies of inclusion with learning disabilities risk achieving the opposite effect as they fail to take into account the needs of this population. It raises the lack of specialist training course to equip teachers with the skills to teach pupils with learning disabilities; the marketisation of social care could result in of low cost services and poorly trained staff; the use of CCTV in care homes which could lead to a reduction in the numbers of skilled staff employed; and the financial vulnerability of many care homes, resulting in the ownership of care home falling into fewer hands. (Edited publisher abstract)

Journal article

Counting inclusion with Chantal Mouffe: a radical democratic approach to intellectual disability research

Authors:
SIMPLICAN Stacy Clifford, LEADER Geraldine
Journal article citation:
Disability and Society, 30(5), 2015, pp.717-730.
Publisher:
Taylor and Francis,

As mandates for social inclusion of people with intellectual disabilities remain unfulfilled, many scholars question whether the concept of inclusion is to blame. Critics worry that quantitative measurements of inclusion miss what should count: a meaningful life gained from a sense of belonging. The authors argue that both the concepts of inclusion and belonging embody a communitarian ethos in which citizens mirror the values of their community. In contrast, Chantal Mouffe’s radical democratic approach to inclusion emphasises the importance of difference and the inevitability of exclusion. Mouffe thus offers a way to broaden our approach to social inclusion in the twenty-first century. (Edited publisher abstract)

Journal article

Finding the sparkle: storytelling in the lives of people with learning disabilities

Author:
GROVE Nicola
Journal article citation:
Tizard Learning Disability Review, 20(1), 2015, pp.29-36.
Publisher:
Emerald

The ability to tell a story, whether personal or fictional, is a skill which can enable people to build a sense of identity, friendship, community and self-advocacy. However, narrative is rarely prioritised in services. This paper describes two approaches to the development of storytelling for people with learning disabilities used by the charity Openstorytellers - Learning to Tell and StorysharingTM. Reflections from interviews are used to illustrate how individuals view their experiences as storytellers, and the benefits that come in the wake of learning to tell and listen to stories. Storytelling led to an increased sense of purpose, confidence, communication and value. The findings are based on subjective perceptions by the people concerned, and were not obtained through independent research. However, they represent a first step towards evaluating the impact of multidimensional interventions. (Edited publisher abstract)

Journal article

Social inclusion through employment: the marketisation of employment support for people with learning disabilities in the United Kingdom

Author:
HUMBER Lee Anderson
Journal article citation:
Disability and Society, 29(2), 2014, pp.275-289.
Publisher:
Taylor and Francis,

Employment for people with learning difficulties is considered key to their social inclusion. This contradicts the perceived un-employability of people with learning difficulties that has been part of their social identities throughout their history hitherto. The national rate of employment for people with learning difficulties remains extremely low and has barely changed in the 20  years between 1990 and 2010. This paper investigates links between learning disabilities and employment, drawing on interview-based research. It analyses the quality of experience of the minority in employment to consider whether employment can serve the inclusive purpose expected of it. (Publisher abstract)

Journal article

Inclusion or outcomes? Tensions in the involvement of people with learning disabilities in strategic planning

Authors:
FYSON Rachel, FOX Liz
Journal article citation:
Disability and Society, 29(2), 2014, pp.239-254.
Publisher:
Taylor and Francis,

Social inclusion is a key principle that underpins the provision of services for people with learning disabilities in England. Learning Disability Partnership Boards, which are responsible for local strategic planning of learning disability services, hold a particular role in promoting inclusion since they are required both to operate inclusively and to achieve inclusive outcomes. This study sought to explore the extent to which these ambitions for inclusion were being achieved. It consisted of three phases: a scoping exercise to elicit the views of key stakeholders; a postal survey of Partnership Boards (response rate 51%); and semi-structured interviews with Partnership Boards members in six local authorities. Findings suggest that Partnership Boards are struggling to fulfil their dual role, with tensions emerging between the desire to operate in fully inclusive ways and the ability to affect strategic change within local services. (Publisher abstract)

Journal article

Preventing mobility barriers to inclusion for people with intellectual disabilities

Authors:
SHERMAN Jean, SHERMAN Sarah
Journal article citation:
Journal of Policy and Practice in Intellectual Disabilities, 10(4), 2014, pp.271-276.
Publisher:
Wiley-Blackwell

This article recounts efforts toward inclusion for people with intellectual disabilities and suggests some reasons why these have fallen short. Research has revealed that limited financial resources, inadequate social supports and transportation, and unwelcoming or negative reciprocal attitudes are important community barriers to inclusion. These barriers are significant to all individuals with disabilities but especially to persons with intellectual disabilities. Regarding intellectual disabilities in the context of person–environment interactions, the authors suggest that other significant barriers to community inclusion may be found in the built environment and result from negative attitudes of the professionals responsible for its creation. The authors highlight the need for an integrated and preventive interdisciplinary educational approach, particularly targeting design professionals, as one meaningful step toward creating truly inclusive and disability-friendly communities. (Edited publisher abstract)

Journal article

Getting connected - how to make community care a reality

Author:
MORRIS David
Journal article citation:
Community Living, 26(4), 2013, pp.18-19.
Publisher:
Hexagon Publishing

The author describes the work of a new Centre - the Centre for Citizenship and Community - and its role in helping service organisations develop practical approaches to community connection. Historically, he argues, services have developed with little focus on this critical part of the community care agenda. (Publisher abstract)

Journal article

In the know

Author:
STERLAND Emma
Journal article citation:
Learning Disability Today, 13(5), September/October 2013, pp.14-15.
Publisher:
Pavilion
Place of publication:
Hove

Finding out about inclusive events for people with learning disabilities can be difficult. This article describes a new inclusive events listing launched by the disability charity Netbuddy and news agency the Press Association to promote opportunities for people with learning disabilities to a wider audience. Other projects around the UK that are also opening up arts and entertainment opportunities for people with learning disabilities are highlighted. These include: Gig Buddies, which pairs up people with learning disabilities with a non-disabled 'buddy' to accompany them to events; Shut up and listen! radio; and JUMPcuts, which enables people with learning disabilities to participate in the making of digital media. (Original abstract)

Journal article

What does Big Society mean for people with learning disabilities?

Authors:
RUNSWICK-COLE Katherine, GOODLEY Dan
Journal article citation:
Learning Disability Today, 13(4), July/August 2013, pp.24-25.
Publisher:
Pavilion
Place of publication:
Hove

A new research project project aims to assess what Big Society means for people with a learning disabilities, the challenges and opportunities they may face and how they fit into it. The research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC) and will be carried out over the next two years. Four universities will be involved in the project: University of Sheffield, Manchester Metropolitan University (MMU), the University of Bristol and Northumbria University. This article describes the main aims of the project and the main phases of the research. (Original abstract)

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