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Journal article Full text available online for free

Supporting self-advocacy

Author:
SOCIAL CARE INSTITUTE FOR EXCELLENCE
Journal article citation:
Community Care, 31.01.08, 2008, pp.34-35.
Publisher:
Reed Business Information

This article draws on SCIE's 'Position Paper 6: Supporting Self-Advocacy' to highlight how best to support self-advocacy services for people with learning disabilities.

Journal article

People First celebrate their success stories

Authors:
BOOTH Wendy, BOOTH Tim
Journal article citation:
Community Living, 7(2), October 1993, pp.14-15.
Publisher:
Hexagon Publishing

Reports on the Third International Conference of the People First movement, held in Toronto in June, which attracted 1400 self-advocates and their supporters from 32 countries.

Book

Supporting self advocacy: a report of two conferences held in June and September 1989 at the King's Fund Centre

Editor:
WHITTAKER Andrea
Publisher:
Kings Fund
Publication year:
1991
Pagination:
60p.,illus.,list of orgs.,biblio
Place of publication:
New Romney

Contains contributions by people with learning difficulties and by people working in supportive roles. Provides information and practical ideas.

Book

Keeping it safe: self-advocacy by people with learning difficulties and the professional response

Author:
DOWSON Steve
Publisher:
Values into Action
Publication year:
1990
Pagination:
24p., bibliog.
Place of publication:
London

Challenges many of the ideas and practices associated with self-advocacy.

Book

We can speak for ourselves: self-advocacy by mentally handicapped people

Authors:
WILLIAMS Paul, SHOULTZ Bonnie
Publisher:
Souvenir Press
Publication year:
1982
Pagination:
245p.
Place of publication:
London
Journal article

Exploring the ethical underpinnings of self-advocacy support for intellectually disabled adults

Authors:
CHAPMAN Rohhss, TILLY Liz
Journal article citation:
Ethics and Social Welfare, 7(3), 2013, pp.257-271.
Publisher:
Taylor and Francis
Place of publication:
Abingdon

Self-advocacy organisations support people in a wide range of political activities, alongside providing key social networks. The emergence of formalised self-advocacy for intellectually disabled people marked an important cultural shift. These groups soon became associated with the pursuit of social change and the attainment of rights. The role of the self-advocacy support worker, working together with self-advocates, has been pivotal. However, studies have shown there has been concern over the relationship between self-advocates and those who advise or support them. Both parties are aware of the potential tensions of supporters teaching people skills to take control, to manage their workers, whilst, perhaps inadvertently, assuming a powerful position in the relationship. This interesting paradox hints at ethical complexities inherent in the role. A key challenge facing these support workers is how they can support their employers to run successful organisations, without ‘taking over’. Using material from both Chapman and Tilley's research of self-advocacy organisations in the UK, this article problematises some key ethical issues within the role. (Edited publisher abstract)

Digital Media

Getting better

Authors:
LEEDS ANIMATION WORKSHOP, (Producer)
Publisher:
Leeds Animation Workshop
Publication year:
2010
Pagination:
(11 mins.), DVD
Place of publication:
Leeds

Six short animated stories about people with learning disabilities who also have mental health problems. The films shows how people with learning disabilities need to stand up for themselves to get fair treatment and in order to look after their health. It also shows what to expect when visiting the doctor's, the clinic or visit the dentist. A booklet is included.

Book

Disability and discourse: analysing inclusive conversation with people with intellectual disabilities

Author:
WILLIAMS Val
Publisher:
Wiley-Blackwell
Publication year:
2011
Pagination:
257p.
Place of publication:
Chichester

This book applies and explains Conversation Analysis (CA), an established methodology for studying communication, to explore what happens during the everyday encounters of people with intellectual disabilities and the other people with whom they interact. It explores conversations and encounters from the lives of people with intellectual disabilities, and introduces the established methodology of Conversation Analysis, making it accessible and useful to a wide range of students, researchers and practitioners. The book adopts a discursive approach which looks at how people with intellectual disabilities use talk in real-life situations, while showing how such talk can be supported and developed, and follows people into the meetings and discussions that take place in self-advocacy and research contexts. It then offers insights into how people with learning disabilities can have a voice in their own affairs, in policy-making, and in research.

Book Full text available online for free

Self advocacy training project: People First Fraserburgh

Author:
PEOPLE FIRST FRASERBURGH
Publisher:
Outside the Box Development Support
Publication year:
2007
Pagination:
25p.
Place of publication:
Glasgow

An accessible report by People First (Fraserburgh) of a project to develop training which will help people with learning difficulties speak up for themselves is presented. The aim of the training is also to help staff who work in local authorities and other jobs understand why people can have difficulty speaking up for themselves.

Journal article

Why are conferences "Sometimes about us, without us"?

Authors:
FRAWLEY Patsie, BIGBY Christine, FORSYTH Heather
Journal article citation:
Journal of Intellectual and Developmental Disability, 31(4), December 2006, pp.249-251.
Publisher:
Informa Healthcare

In this article the authors identify a number of issues, and make suggestions, of how to make conferences about people with learning disabilities to be more accessible to people with learning disabilities. The article is based on their involvement with the Australasian Society for the Study of Intellectual Disability (ASSID) National Conferences.

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