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Journal article

Tracking post-school destinations of young people with mild intellectual disabilities: the problem of attrition

Authors:
CATON Sue, KAGAN Carolyn
Journal article citation:
Journal of Applied Research in Intellectual Disabilities, 19(2), June 2006, pp.143-152.
Publisher:
Wiley-Blackwell

This research was carried out as an assessment of the transition towards adult life for school leavers with mild intellectual disabilities. Ninety young people who were enrolled at three schools for people with mild intellectual disabilities were followed up for the first 12–18 months after they left school to assess how they experienced this transition. Young people were interviewed using semi-structured interviews before they left school regarding their aspirations for school leaving. They were then followed up and those who were traced were interviewed a second time regarding how they had experienced the previous year. There were a number of difficulties encountered in following up the school leavers. Most importantly, there were a high number of participants who were unable to be traced for the study, by the schools, the careers office, or other service providers. The attrition started early in the transition process and was largely overlooked by the schools and careers service, presenting a challenge for successful transition experiences. The implications of the high level of attrition are discussed. In addition, the impact of a number of new initiatives are discussed.

Book

Choosing a school for your child with special educational needs?

Author:
MENCAP
Publisher:
MENCAP
Publication year:
2005
Pagination:
3p.
Place of publication:
London

Special educational needs and special education are very wide terms. At some stage during their school life, 1 in 5 of all children will need some form of special education. For most children this can be provided in a local primary or secondary school, sometimes called a mainstream school. For children with complex educational needs they may need a special school for some or all of their school life. All children now have a right to go to a mainstream school if that is what you want. The only exception to this right is when a child with special educational needs would have a negative effect on the education of other children in the class.

Journal article

A day in the life… a worm's eye view of doing research in a school with young people with learning difficulties

Author:
FLITTON Beverley
Journal article citation:
Counselling and Psychotherapy Research, 5(2), June 2005, pp.138-139.
Publisher:
Taylor and Francis
Book Full text available online for free

Manual of professional practice in meeting special educational needs

Author:
SCOTLAND. Scottish Executive. Education and Industry Department
Publisher:
Scotland. Scottish Executive
Publication year:
2004
Pagination:
110p.
Place of publication:
Edinburgh
Book Full text available online for free

Length of school week: pupils in special schools and units

Author:
SCOTLAND. Scottish Executive. Education Department
Publisher:
Scotland. Scottish Executive
Publication year:
2002
Pagination:
5p.
Place of publication:
Edinburgh
Book Full text available online for free

Raising attainment for pupils with special educational needs

Author:
SCOTLAND. Scottish Executive. Education Department
Publisher:
Scotland. Scottish Executive Education Department
Publication year:
2001
Pagination:
18p.
Place of publication:
Edinburgh
Journal article

The impact of an in-class sensory activity schedule on task performance of children with autism and intellectual disability: a pilot study

Authors:
MILLS Caroline, CHAPPARO Christine, HINITT Joanne
Journal article citation:
British Journal of Occupational Therapy, 79(9), 2016, p.530–539.
Publisher:
College of Occupational Therapists

Introduction: There is limited evidence to support use of sensory interventions by teachers in the classroom. The purpose of this pilot study is to determine the effectiveness of sensory activity schedule intervention in supporting participation and increasing classroom task performance in students with autism. Method: A non-concurrent, AB single system research design across multiple baselines was used with four students with autism who attended an autism-specific school. Students demonstrated atypical sensory processing, which negatively affected their school performance. Repeated baseline and intervention data were collected by school staff using video recording during classroom tasks. Tasks performed were designated by the child’s teacher. Stage one of the Perceive, Recall, Plan, Perform System of Task Analysis was used as a repeated measure of student performance. Ratings were carried out by independent raters who were blinded to the condition of performance. Results: Results revealed three out of four students achieved significant improvements in classroom task performance following the use of sensory activity schedule intervention developed in consultation with an occupational therapist as measured by the task analysis. Conclusion: This study provides emerging evidence for the use of sensory activity schedule intervention in the classroom for students with autism. (Publisher abstract)

Journal article

Trends in the identification of children with learning disabilities within state schools in England

Authors:
HATTON Chris, EMERSON Eric
Journal article citation:
Tizard Learning Disability Review, 21(2), 2016, pp.108-112.
Publisher:
Emerald

Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to present data drawn from the Department for Education (DfE)concerning trends in the number of children identified as having a learning disability within state schools in England. Design/methodology/approach: Data based on the school census conducted by the DfE was examined annually for 2009/2010 to 2014/2015, to determine the number of children identified as having moderate learning difficulty (MLD), severe learning difficulty (SLD) or profound multiple learning difficulty (PMLD) within state schools in England, at two levels: having a Statement of Educational Needs/Education Health Care Plan, or at School Action Plus. Findings: The number of children identified as MLD reduced substantially over time, for both statemented children and children identified at the School Action Plus level. In contrast, the smaller number of statemented children with SLD or PMLD increased over time, in line with increasing school rolls and epidemiological trends. Research limitations/implications: Further work is needed to understand the sharp reduction in the number of children being identified as having MLD within schools, and the educational support being offered to this group of children. Better information is also needed on children with learning disabilities not being educated in the state school sector. Originality/value: This paper highlights important trends in the identification of children with learning disabilities in state schools in England, with consequences for how large groups of children are being supported.

Book Full text available online for free

Special educational needs and their links to poverty

Authors:
SHAW Bart, et al
Publisher:
Joseph Rowntree Foundation
Publication year:
2016
Pagination:
46
Place of publication:
York

This report explores the links between special educational needs and disability (SEND) and poverty, showing that poverty is both a cause and an effect of SEND. The report gives some background on SEND and reviews the evidence relating to the causal links between SEND and poverty; provides an overview of policy and legislation relating to children with SEND in different parts of the UK; and examines the key issues impacting on children with SEND from low-income families and suggests ways in which the SEND system might be improved to better meet their needs and those of their parents. The report concludes with a series of recommendations, including: policy-makers and school and early years leaders should prioritise SEND; staff in schools and early years settings should be trained to identify needs so that they can be spotted early and over-identification and under-identification are reduced; and targeted funding for pupils with SEND who are at risk of exclusion should be provided so that schools can support them before they are excluded. (Edited publisher abstract)

Book Full text available online for free

The green paper on special educational needs and disability

Author:
GILLLIE Christine
Publisher:
Great Britain. Parliament. House of Commons Library
Publication year:
2011
Pagination:
17p.
Place of publication:
London

This Standard Note outlines the current special educational needs (SEN) system in England, and highlights the main proposals in the Government’s green paper on special educational needs and disability. The Green Paper considers how to achieve: better educational outcomes and life chances for children and young people with special educational needs and disabilities - from the early years through to the transition into adult life and employment; better early intervention to prevent problems later; and greater choice for parents in the schools their children attend and the support and services they receive, whether in a mainstream or special school setting. A selection of initial reaction to the green paper is provided. The note also includes information on the pathfinder programme to test key elements of the green paper’s proposals. The paper proposes: a new approach to identifying SEN through a single early years setting-based category and school-based category of SEN; a new single assessment process and Education, Health and Care Plan by 2014; local authorities and other services to set out a local offer of all services available; the option of a personal budget by 2014 for all families with children with a statement of SEN or a new Education, Health and Care Plan; strengthening parental choice of school, for either a mainstream or special school; and changing the assessment process to make it more independent.

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