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Book

Residential provision for people with learning disabilities: summary report

Authors:
EMERSON Eric, et al
Publisher:
University of Manchester. Hester Adrian Research Centre
Publication year:
1996
Pagination:
19p.,bibliog.
Place of publication:
Manchester

Summary of a review, commissioned by the Department of Health, of residential provision for people with learning difficulties. The review aims to: produce a summary of existing research relating to the cost, quality and differing forms of residential provision in the UK; to utilise the 1991 Census to describe current provision; to begin to map out, through consultation and visits, the defining characteristics and differing approaches to residential provision; and to generate a list of recommendations concerning the conduct of future research into the subject.

Journal article

Lionhearted trust...

Author:
DOWNEY Rachel
Journal article citation:
Care Weekly, 14.10.93, 1993, p.16.

The Leo Trust is a new project for people with learning disabilities. Based in Brissenden Court, Ashford in Kent the project will be home to 10 people and will serve up to 32 users. Equality for people with learning disabilities is its central value.

Journal article

Mixed impressions

Author:
WARD Linda
Journal article citation:
Community Care, 7.5.92, 1992, pp.22-23.
Publisher:
Reed Business Information

Looks at the provision of village communities for people with learning difficulties in the Netherlands.

Journal article

Melting values?

Author:
IVORY Mark
Journal article citation:
Community Care, 30.5.91, 1991, p.7.
Publisher:
Reed Business Information

Questions whether village communities are a viable service option for people with learning difficulties.

Book

Residential Care Review: literature survey: mental handicap

Author:
ATKINSON Dorothy
Publisher:
National Institute for Social Work
Publication year:
1986
Pagination:
38p., bibliog.
Place of publication:
London
Book

An ordinary life: comprehensive locally-based residential services for mentally handicapped people

Author:
KING'S FUND CENTRE
Publisher:
King's Fund Centre
Publication year:
1980
Pagination:
44p.,bibliog.
Place of publication:
London
Journal article

How do we prevent another Winterbourne? A literature review

Author:
WRIGHT Sally
Journal article citation:
Advances in Mental Health and Intellectual Disabilities, 7(6), 2013, pp.3-14.
Publisher:
Emerald

Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to focus on the precipitants of physical and psychological abuse of individuals with intellectual disabilities in order to understand why mistreatment continues to be prevalent. In particular, the importance of contributing factors were explored such as challenging behaviour and lack of staff training, in an attempt to prevent another “Winterbourne”. Design/methodology/approach – A literature search using the search terms “Intellectual disability”, “learning disability”, “abuse”, “challenging behaviour” and “residential” was conducted. Articles were included using the criteria: adults with intellectual disabilities, concentration on neglect and physical abuse, abuse by staff members and articles written within the last 15 years. Using these criteria, a total of 19 articles were isolated. Additional articles were located through reference to citation lists. In total, 31 relevant articles were identified. Findings – The majority of research agrees that a meaningful increase in risk of abuse does exist for individuals with intellectual disabilities. There is a lack of recent empirical evidence discussing the incidence of abuse, potential causes and the long-term impact of staff training in reducing the incidence of abuse. These gaps may be due to the subjective definition of abuse, the current “reactive” approach to abuse, the ability of perpetrators to hide mistreatment and difficulty in quantifying the difference that increased staff training has on performance. More research is required to adequately protect individuals with intellectual disabilities in the residential setting. Originality/value – The paper highlights gaps in the current literature and identifies potential areas that could be improved in order to reduce the prevalence of abuse in residential care. (Edited publisher abstract)

Book Full text available online for free

Review of compliance: Castlebeck Care (Teesdale) Ltd.: Winterbourne View

Author:
CARE QUALITY COMMISSION
Publisher:
Care Quality Commission
Publication year:
2011
Pagination:
45p.
Place of publication:
London

Winterbourne View is a 24-bed purpose designed Assessment and Treatment Unit providing healthcare and support for adults with learning disabilities, complex needs and challenging behaviour. It is operated by  Castlebeck Care (Teesdale) Ltd. This review was carried out following the BBC television programme Panorama which showed the serious abuse of patients at Winterbourne View over several months. The review found that Winterbourne View was not meeting 10 essential standards. Concerns resulted in the Care Quality Commission taking enforcement action to remove Winterbourne View from the registration of Castlebeck Care (Teesdale) Ltd.

Book

Discovering Camphill: new perspectives, research and developments

Editors:
JACKSON Robin, (ed.)
Publisher:
Floris Books
Publication year:
2011
Pagination:
336p.
Place of publication:
Edinburgh

Bringing together research from scholars and experts in a variety of disciplines, the editors explore a broad range of issues which affect Camphill life. The essays examine social, political and educational topics including; spiritual needs, residential childcare, disabled identity, working with autistic children and the development of Camphill communities around the world. It is suggested that the lack of easily accessible literature about Camphill communities has contributed to a common perception of Camphill as 'closed' communities which have little interest in communicating with the 'the outside world'. Some influential officials and practitioners who determine education and social-work policy and practice are believed to know little about Camphill, thus increasing the risk of misunderstanding and threatening the future of Camphill communities. The book has two main aims; to report on the finding of research on several Camphill communities, and to discuss societal trends which may impact on the future of the Camphill movement. This book seeks not only to bridge the knowledge gap about Camphilll but also to demonstrate to a wider audience the unique and inspiring qualities of Camphill communities. The book is expected to be of interest to those with an interest in the provision of services for children and adults with special needs.

Journal article

Transforming staff practice through active support

Authors:
RICHES Vivenne C., et al
Journal article citation:
Journal of Intellectual and Developmental Disability, 36(3), September 2011, pp.156-166.
Publisher:
Informa Healthcare

The active support model is being introduced in many residential and respite homes worldwide. It aims to increase the opportunities for the participation of people with intellectual disability (ID) in meaningful activity with appropriate assistance from staff. This article describes the development and delivery of an active support training pilot for staff in a large government organisation that supports people with ID in Australia. A train-the-trainer approach was used in which 5 apprentice trainers were trained to provide active support training to 65 staff associated with 6 group homes. These 5 trainers were then monitored to provide training to 54 staff in another 6 group homes. Staff evaluated their interactive training experiences by completing an anonymous questionnaire. In addition, pre and post outcome data were collected for a small number of service users from group homes, along with staff outcome data regarding residential working practices, group home management, and staffing practices. The findings show that the train-the-trainer model was an effective strategy for training large numbers of staff. The interactive training component was particularly effective and was associated with improvements in service user engagement in domestic tasks and decreased depression levels. Staff job satisfaction increased and significant improvements were recorded in residential working practices.

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