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Book

In pursuit of quality: overcoming forces which work against the building of quality cultures in public service organisations; a handbook of quality actions

Authors:
COOTE Alan, JONES Michael
Publisher:
Mental Handicap Nurses Association
Publication year:
1991
Pagination:
71p.,bibliog.
Place of publication:
Penarth

Handbook identifying 'blockages' which can work against quality services and suggesting practical ways in which these can be overcome. Part I identifies 13 potential blockages and suggests actions that can be taken. Part 2 contains checklist notes providing ideas for putting quality actions into practice.

Journal article

Guaranteeing good value

Author:
NEATE Polly
Journal article citation:
Community Care, 25.10.90, 1990, pp.32-33.
Publisher:
Reed Business Information

Reports on the work of the Norah Fry Research Centre.

Journal article

Providing quality assurance of housing associations’ services

Author:
HOWELLS Katherine
Journal article citation:
Llais, 104, Autumn 2012, pp.19-20.
Publisher:
Learning Disability Wales

In December 2011, a new regulatory framework for housing associations was introduced by the Welsh Government. The principle aim of the framework is to ‘ensure that housing associations provide good quality services to tenants’. First Choice Housing Association provides homes for individuals with learning disabilities in Wales and Shropshire. This article describes how First Choice, in readiness for assessment by the Welsh Government, worked with a Quality Assurance Officer to gain meaningful feedback from its tenants to improve the services delivered to them. First Choice had previously used traditional satisfaction questionnaires and surveys. In order to gain honest feedback and to reach tenants who may traditionally not be involved in tenant participation work, the services were engaged of an independent Quality Assurance Officer. The Quality Assurance Officer visited a total of 28 (20%) of tenants homes. Issues raised in these interviews included parking, maintenance issues, and antisocial behaviour. The responses increased the association’s understanding of the barriers that tenants face and enabled them to address individual concerns.

Journal article

Development and preliminary validation of the QUALITRA-ID-P: a user-orientated questionnaire for parents and relatives to assess the quality of care and service trajectories for intellectually disabled persons

Authors:
BARELDS Anna, et al
Journal article citation:
Journal of Applied Research in Intellectual Disabilities, 24(5), September 2011, pp.468-481.
Publisher:
Wiley-Blackwell

Care and service trajectories for people with intellectual disabilities are routes within the health care delivery system that consist of all the steps that the individual and their families have to take in order to achieve their required care and services. The aim of this article is to describe the development and the preliminary validation of a user-orientated questionnaire for parents or relatives of people with intellectual disability (QUALITRA-ID-P) to assess the quality of care and service trajectories of their children or relatives with intellectual disability. The article starts by presenting the conceptualisation and operationalisation of quality of care and service trajectories. It then describes how the QUALITRA-ID-P was constructed using the findings identified in the conceptualisation and operationalisation stages. The QUALITRA-ID-P was refined in 2 stages: examination of feasibility, understandability and completeness; and preliminary validation. The final QUALITRA-ID-P is a 49-item scale with good reliability and validity. Care providers can use the QUALITRA-ID-P to understand better the experiences of quality of their clients’ relatives and as a result improve the quality of trajectories.

Journal article

Care and service trajectories for people with intellectual disabilities: defining its course and quality determinants from the client's perspective

Author:
BARELDS Anna
Journal article citation:
Journal of Policy and Practice in Intellectual Disabilities, 6(3), September 2009, pp.163-172.
Publisher:
Wiley-Blackwell

Care and service trajectories are identifiable routes through service systems that consist of all steps that people with intellectual disabilities (ID) and their families have to take to realize the care and services they need. Trajectories are especially prominent during the transitions from children's services to adult services. Within a service system in Noord-Brabant (in the Netherlands), the authors examined the course of such trajectories and their main bottlenecks and sought to identify their quality determinants. The first research question was addressed by an exercise in document analysis and the holding of semistructured interviews with key informants within the healthcare sector specialized for serving people with ID. A second research question was addressed by means of a literature review on integrated care. The authors observe that trajectories generally follow a "model route" consisting of five phases but may vary according to age category, degree of disability, and life domain. With respect to "bottlenecks," the authors noted that a lack of suitable supply and long waiting lists are good examples. They found that the literature on integrated care revealed that continuity, accessibility, availability, and flexibility of care and services, together with the seamlessness of transitions, are all important quality determinants for people with ID when judging their service trajectories. Bottlenecks and quality determinants of trajectories are strongly interrelated. The authors concluded that the literature and the key informants agree as to which factors are most important in realizing high-quality trajectories for individual clients. They recommend asking which criteria people with ID and their families value most when judging the quality of trajectories.

Journal article

Improving service quality through linked services development

Author:
BROADSHAW Jill
Journal article citation:
Tizard Learning Disability Review, 6(4), October 2001, pp.12-18.
Publisher:
Emerald

The University Affiliated Programme (UAP) aims to improve service quality by working in partnership with local services. This article reports on the establishment and development of linked services: three services for people with learning disabilities, living in small community houses that opened in late 1999 and early 2000. The focus of resources on a small number of linked services was designed to maximise the effectiveness of the involvement of the Tizard Centre, along with the Subscriber Network. It was intended that work in the linked services would be disseminated through this network. The UAP has worked with service users and providers since 1996, during which time users have moved from long-stay NHS hospital to community services. The service provider is also now a private organisation. The article outlines some of the projects which have been introduced or developed in these linked services and discusses some of the issues that have arisen while working in partnership with them. The benefits of working through a UAP will also be identified.

Journal article Full text available online for free

Quality through unity

Author:
DOBLE Paddy
Journal article citation:
Care Plan, 2(4), June 1996, pp.28-31.
Publisher:
Positive Publications/ Anglia Polytechnic University, Faculty of Health and Social Work

Quality Action Groups have been set up in different parts of the country as a structured means of bringing 'stakeholders' together to improve services. The author, Quality Assurance Manager at Wiltshire Social Services Department, describes one project and how it achieved greater privacy for a group of people with learning difficulties.

Book

"Managing quality": the report of an inspection of the arrangements for managing the quality of care in supported accommodation for people with learning disabilities provided by the West Glamorgan Housing Consortium; April 1996

Author:
GREAT BRITAIN. Welsh Office. Social Services Inspectorate for Wales
Publisher:
Great Britain. Welsh Office. Social Services Inspectorate for Wales
Publication year:
1996
Pagination:
69p.
Place of publication:
Cardiff
Journal article

Implementing Quality Assurance - auditing residential services for people with mental handicaps

Authors:
WATSON Elisabeth, et al
Journal article citation:
Mental Handicap, 21(2), June 1993, pp.42-45.
Publisher:
British Institute of Mental Handicap

Reports on the format and implementation of a quality audit, Monyhull Audit Technique for Environmental Evaluation (MATEE), to evaluate the quality of residential services for people with mental handicaps. It is suggested that the key to successful quality auditing lies in the way in which the system is operationalised. The audit must be ongoing rather than a 'one-off' event. The procedure needs to be clearly specified, important aspects of which should include positive monitoring, regular follow-up on objectives and maximal involvement of care staff. Some of the benefits of this type of quality assurance are discussed.

Journal article

Total quality

Authors:
SPACKMAN Angela, HIGGINS Joan
Journal article citation:
Health Service Journal, 3.10.91, 1991, pp.26-27.
Publisher:
Emap Healthcare

Describes the introduction of a total quality management strategy for services for people with learning disabilities in a mental handicap services unit.

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