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Journal article

Impact of an individualized planning approach on personal outcomes and supports for persons with intellectual disabilities

Authors:
GOSSE Leanne, et al
Journal article citation:
Journal of Policy and Practice in Intellectual Disabilities, 14(3), 2017, pp.198-204.
Publisher:
Wiley-Blackwell

Planning initiatives for individuals with intellectual disabilities (ID) have shifted from traditional planning primarily conducted by caregivers to an individualised planning approach controlled by the person with ID him/herself. The goal of this paradigm shift is to increase individualisation of supports to accomplish personal objectives and improve quality of life. Despite the widespread acceptance and promotion of individualised planning, there has been little empirical research to demonstrate its effectiveness. This study compares traditional planning to individualised planning on supports obtained and personal objectives accomplished using a randomised between-group design. Persons receiving an individualised planning process improved in both supports and personal outcomes as compared to the traditional planning group. When the traditional planning group subsequently received individualised planning, they replicated the results of the first individualised planning group. The findings support implementation of an individualised planning approach in service agencies for individuals with ID. (Edited publisher abstract)

Journal article

Outcomes from the National High Secure Learning Disability Service: findings and challenges

Authors:
MORRISSEY Catrin, et al
Journal article citation:
Advances in Mental Health and Intellectual Disabilities, 9(3), 2015, pp.116-1233.
Publisher:
Emerald

Purpose: The “outcomes revolution” in healthcare has yet to impact strongly on secure intellectual disability (ID) services in the UK. The purpose of this paper is to review the service-level outcome studies that exist for this population, and to explore some of the challenges of conducting such research. It further describes some illustrative routine outcome data from the National High Secure Learning Disability Service. Design/methodology/approach: Routinely collected outcome measures (length of stay; violent incidents; Emotional Problem Scale (EPS) Behaviour Rating Scale and EPS Self-Report Inventory) were analysed for two overlapping cohorts of patients resident in the high-secure service between 2008 and 2013. Findings: The median length of stay of those discharged during the study period (n=27) was around 9.9 years (range one to 40 years). A significant proportion (25 per cent) of discharges resulted in an eventual return to high security. There did not appear to be a treatment effect over two to three years using staff-rated global clinical measures, but patient-rated clinical measures did reduce. Violent incidents also reduced significantly over a longer period of four years in treatment. Research limitations/implications: There are identified challenges to research design and outcome measurement which need to be addressed in any future cross-service studies. Originality/value: There are relatively few published outcome studies from forensic ID services. None of the studies have used clinical measures of changes or patient-rated outcome measures. (Publisher abstract)

Journal article

Factors that influence outcomes for clients with an intellectual disability

Author:
RAFFENSBERGER Marilyn K.
Journal article citation:
British Journal of Guidance and Counselling, 37(4), November 2009, pp.495-509.
Publisher:
Taylor and Francis

Is counselling effective for clients with an intellectual disability? Practitioners question not only the ability of these clients to derive benefit from counselling but also their own ability to provide an effective service. However, this simplistic binary question does not do justice to the complexities of either the counselling process or the lives of those with an intellectual disability. A more useful question would be, 'What factors influence the counselling outcomes of these clients?' This review invites practitioners to refrain from questioning abilities, but rather to reflect on their practice in light of this latter question. Researchers are invited to broaden the scope of their enquiry to further assist practitioners' reflections.

Journal article

Person-centred planning: factors associated with successful outcomes for people with intellectual disabilities

Authors:
ROBERTSON J., et al
Journal article citation:
Journal of Intellectual Disability Research, 51(3), March 2007, pp.232-243.
Publisher:
Wiley

Recent research in the USA and UK indicates that person-centred planning (PCP) can lead to improvements in lifestyle-related outcomes for people with intellectual disabilities (ID). It is clear, however, that the introduction of PCP does not have an equal impact for all participants. The aim of the present paper was to identify factors associated with the probability of delivering a plan and with improvements in outcomes for those who did receive a plan. Information on the life experiences of participants was collected over a period of approximately 2 years for a cohort of 93 adults with ID across four sites in England. There were powerful inequalities in both access to and the efficacy of PCP in relation to participant characteristics, contextual factors and elements of the PCP process. Results are discussed in relation to implications for policy and practice for increasing the effectiveness of PCP and reducing inequalities in the life experiences of people with ID.

Book

Your role as a learning disability worker

Author:
POUNTNEY Jackie
Publisher:
Heinemann; British Institute of Learning Disabilities
Publication year:
2007
Pagination:
92p.
Place of publication:
Oxford

Introduces understanding of the role of Learning Disability Worker and the responsibilities of supporting someone who has a learning disability. The book meets the learning outcomes for the unit, with a range of features to make the learning stimulating and interesting. Written by BILD, so learners can be sure of relevant and reliable content, the book provides all necessary underpinning knowledge and careful linking to the relevant NVQ.

Book

Lines in the sand: final report

Authors:
SIMONS Ken, RUSSELL Oliver
Publisher:
Norah Fry Research Centre
Publication year:
2003
Pagination:
129p.
Place of publication:
Bristol

A research project on the interface between mental health and learning disability services. The main objective of this research project, which was funded by the South West Regional NHS Research and Development Directorate, was to carry out an audit of ‘pressure points’ within services for people with learning disabilities and mental health needs in South West England. A retrospective two-year census of case files (n=348) was carried out, supplemented by in-depth interviews with key clinical staff (n=30), and semi-structured interviews with commissioners from Valuing People Partnership Boards (n =10) and Local Implementation Teams for the National Service Framework for Mental Health (n=9). The main outcome measures were descriptions of patterns of service use, along with the presence (or otherwise) of disputes and/or joint working, set in the context of the views of providers and commissioners.

Journal article

Monitoring change in psychotherapy with people with intellectual disabilities: the application of the Assimilation of Problematic Experiences Scale

Authors:
NEWMAN David W., BEAIL Nigel
Journal article citation:
Journal of Applied Research in Intellectual Disabilities, 15(1), 2002, pp.48-60.
Publisher:
Wiley-Blackwell

The assimilation model and the assimilation of problematic experiences scale (APES), provide a structured account of changes occurring within psychotherapy. The model proposes that the clients assimilate their problematic experience through the development of schema observable in the psychotherapeutic setting. The model provides a way of describing change in psychotherapy independent of affiliation to a single theoretical school. This paper aims to demonstrate the application of APES methodology to psychotherapy with people with intellectual disabilities. An innovative research procedure is implemented, utilizing transcript and rating procedures in relation to a client and therapist dialogue within psychodynamic psychotherapy. Outcome data is collected from psychometric questionnaires. Quantitative data and qualitative methods are combined to portray results in the format of a single case study. The presented case illustrates assimilation achieved by a client with intellectual disabilities within and across psychotherapy sessions. Outcome data is also provided. This study provides a newly obtained information on the applicability of psychotherapy and the assimilation model in relation to this client group. The outcome data acts as a point of reference with which to examine the nature and validity of APES findings. The present authors argue that process research has a significant role in advancing our understanding of psychotherapy with the people with intellectual disabilities.

Journal article

An evaluation of a community living initiative in Ireland

Authors:
SHEERIN Fintan, et al
Journal article citation:
Journal of Intellectual Disabilities, 19(3), 2015, pp.266-281.
Publisher:
Sage
Place of publication:
London

One of the central principles underpinning Irish intellectual disability policy is that of decongregation. Allied to this is the belief that life in community settings offers greater opportunities and richer experiences than does life in institutional settings. This study explores the experiences of a group of adults with intellectual disabilities who moved from residential settings to living units in the community. Using a qualitative descriptive approach, it considers the significance of that move for them and seeks to understand the extent to which their lives have changed. Whereas it emerges that this was a positive period in their lives, it is clear that a number of issues remain to be addressed and these provide useful information for similar developments in the future. (Publisher abstract)

Book Full text available online for free

Developing an easy read version of the Adult Social Care Outcomes Toolkit (ASCOT)

Authors:
TURNPENNY Agnes, et al
Publisher:
Quality and Outcomes of Person-centred Care Policy Research Unit
Publication year:
2015
Pagination:
89
Place of publication:
Canterbury

This study aims to develop and test a robust easy read version of the Adult Social Care Outcomes Toolkit (ASCOT), and ensure it meets the needs of respondents with learning disabilities. ASCOT is a measure of social care-related quality of life and is used as part of the Personal Social Services Adult Social Care Survey in England. An easy read version of ASCOT could ensure that social care research include people who, although having capacity to consent to taking part in research, are not able to respond to standard questionnaires and surveys. This study indicates that the revised easy read version adequately represents the ASCOT domains and the standard questionnaire. However, ASCOT-ER might benefit from further systematic testing, particularly around validity and reliability. (Edited publisher abstract)

Book Full text available online for free

Premature deaths of people with learning disabilities: progress update

Author:
GREAT BRITAIN. Department of Health
Publisher:
Great Britain. Department of Health
Publication year:
2014
Pagination:
22
Place of publication:
London

This report updates progress made on recommendations of the 'Confidential Inquiry into premature deaths of people with learning disabilities' (2013). The progress update summarises action taken or underway against each of the main themes themes from the Inquiry, including: improving assessment to identify people with learning disabilities; better integration of services; access to healthcare and interventions; and end-of-life care. Examples of local good practice and national initiatives are included. The report notes that progress has been made, but that more needs to be done. Three specific actions for local areas are highlighted: participating fully in the Self-Assessment Framework and acting on its results; securing the provision of named care co-ordinators; ensuring reasonable adjustments are made and audited. (Edited publisher abstract)

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