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Journal article

Dr Tulp attends the soft machine: patient simulators, user involvement and intellectual disability

Authors:
McCLIMENS Alex, LEWIS Robin, BREWSTER Jacqui
Journal article citation:
Journal of Intellectual Disabilities, 16(3), September 2012, pp.173-182.
Publisher:
Sage
Place of publication:
London

Simulation may be seen as an effective educational strategy to address the growing moral and ethical issues around ‘practising’ on human patients. Patient simulators are very useful when the student learner needs to practise invasive techniques on an unconscious patient. Simulation works much less well where the technology is unable to replicate the ‘bio-fidelity’ associated with real life situations. For example, the utility of simulation models rapidly diminishes when the patient is conscious and has communication difficulties, and when the clinical interventions are more ‘social’ in nature. The article argues that patient simulation is of limited use for some patient populations such as people with intellectual disability and with a wide range of impairment, communication and mobility issues. Students must be able to see beyond the equipment and connect their learning to actual human beings.

Journal article

Non-verbal communication between Registered Nurses Intellectual Disability and people with an intellectual disability: an exploratory study of the nurse’s experiences. Part 2

Authors:
MARTIN Anne-Marie, O'CONNOR-FENELON Maureen, LYONS Rosemary
Journal article citation:
Journal of Intellectual Disabilities, 16(2), June 2012, pp.97-108.
Publisher:
Sage
Place of publication:
London

This second of two articles presents findings from a qualitative study which investigated the experiences of Registered Nurses Intellectual Disability (RNIDs) of communicating with people with an intellectual disability who communicate non-verbally in Ireland. Part 1 discussed the background, context and methodology along with category of ‘familiarity/knowing the person’. This article explores the themes and subthemes encapsulated within this category. Each theme is considered in the light of current policies and strategies influencing the provision of services to people with an intellectual disability. Overall, the results suggest that the RNID is ideally located and key to supporting the implementation of these policies and strategies due to their highly developed and proficient skill set as well as experience of communicating with people with an intellectual disability who communicate non-verbally. Implications for practice are presented.

Journal article

Intellectual disability nursing in Ireland: identifying its development and future

Authors:
DOODY Owen, SLEVIN Eamonn, TAGGART Lawrence
Journal article citation:
Journal of Intellectual Disabilities, 16(1), March 2012, pp.7-16.
Publisher:
Sage
Place of publication:
London

Intellectual disability nursing is one of the smallest branches of nursing in Ireland. As the discipline of intellectual disability nursing is unique to Ireland and the United Kingdom, there is a responsibility on intellectual disability nurses to identify their unique identity and their responses to the demands of changing services. Since its inception as an individual nursing profession in 1959 in Ireland, both education and service provision philosophies have changed over time. These changes have been in response to national and international reports and changing attitudes. The history of the care of persons with an intellectual disability in Ireland was originally one of institutional care and segregation from the community, but in the 1980s a social model of care began to be implemented. Intellectual disability nurse education in Ireland is currently a 4-year undergraduate course. Over the years, the discipline has been subject to much debate, relating to the nature of intellectual disability nursing and the knowledge, skills and role of nurses working in this area. This article traces the development of intellectual disability nursing in Ireland, identifying its educational development, service changes and future position.

Journal article

Learning disabilities in later life

Author:
NUMAS Roger
Journal article citation:
Nursing Times, 11.11.98, 1998, pp.56-57.
Publisher:
Nursing Times

Discusses how nurses can help ensure the right care for people with learning disabilities in old age.

Journal article

Triumphant return in a new role

Author:
CARLISLE Daloni
Journal article citation:
Nursing Times, 5.11.97, 1997, pp.77-80.
Publisher:
Nursing Times

Discusses how the role of the learning disabilities nurse has changed over the past ten years.

Journal article

Learning curve

Author:
McMILLAN Ian
Journal article citation:
Nursing Times, 9.8.95, 1995, p.16.
Publisher:
Nursing Times

Increasing numbers of learning disability nurses are delivering community-based care. Outlines the latest bid to clarify their role.

Journal article

Dramatic effect

Author:
SHIRTLIFFE Derek
Journal article citation:
Nursing Times, 7.6.95, 1995, pp.62-63.
Publisher:
Nursing Times

Drama offers clients opportunities to develop skills and confidence. Considers approaches for effective work with people with learning difficulties.

Journal article

Risk-taking for learning disabilities

Author:
SHIRTLIFFE Derek
Journal article citation:
Nursing Times, 1.2.95, 1995, pp.40-42.
Publisher:
Nursing Times

Examines conditions and influences that precipitate or inhibit risk-taking by nurses working with people with learning disabilities.

Journal article

Positive partnerships

Author:
SINES David
Journal article citation:
Nursing Times, 8.6.94, 1994, pp.54-57.
Publisher:
Nursing Times

Argues that, based on recent achievements in learning disability nursing, nurses can now help their clients achieve more integrated lives in the community.

Journal article

Paving the way

Author:
DARBYSHIRE Philip
Journal article citation:
Nursing Times, 13.10.93, 1993, pp.42-44.
Publisher:
Nursing Times

Offers advice to nurses on medical and surgical wards caring for people with learning disabilities, and urges nurses to get to know this group of patients.

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