Filter results

Register/log in to your SCIE account to use the search filters below

Search results for ‘Subject term:"learning disabilities"’ Sort:  

Results 1 - 10 of 484

Journal article Full text available online for free

The importance of romantic love to people with learning disabilities

Authors:
BATES Claire, TERRY Louise, POPPLE Keith
Journal article citation:
British Journal of Learning Disabilities, 45(1), 2017, pp.64-72.
Publisher:
Wiley-Blackwell

Background: Love is important aspect of life, including to people with learning disabilities both historically and more recently. Participants value the companionship, support and social status associated with a partner. Relationships are considered mechanisms to meet certain needs including feeling loved, company, intimacy and enabling individuals to marry and have children. This article examines the importance of romantic love to people with learning disabilities. Methods: A hermeneutic phenomenological study, guided by the theory of Van Manen was conducted using interviews with eleven people with learning disabilities examining the importance of romantic love. Results: The analysis revealed that love was important to them, specifically the companionship and support a loving partner provided. The physical expression of love by a partner was valued highly, especially kissing and cuddling. Most participants had experienced some form of abuse, but it appeared that the love of a partner was reparative and they were able to form satisfying relationships. Conclusion: Participants’ narratives highlighted the role staff play in supporting them to fulfill their romantic needs. The romantic relationship needs of people with learning disabilities were examined in relation to Maslow's hierarchy of needs. The hierarchy was revised to reflect the value of having a loving relationship to people with learning disabilities and to identify the support they required to facilitate and maintain this. (Publisher abstract)

Journal article

What is normal behaviour in persons with developmental disabilities?

Authors:
DOSEN Anton, De GROEF Johan
Journal article citation:
Advances in Mental Health and Intellectual Disabilities, 9(5), 2015, pp.284-294.
Publisher:
Emerald

Purpose: Annoying and bothersome behaviours among persons with developmental disabilities (DD) is a relatively frequent phenomenon. However, not all behaviour that is difficult to accept in its surroundings should be seen as abnormal or problem behaviour (PB). Some of these behaviours may be an expression of a person’s psychosocial needs and may be considered as adaptive and normal. The paper aims to discuss these issues. Design/methodology/approach: Authors attempt to discuss relevant issues in persons with DD which have an impact on their behaviour, intending in this way to define criteria for a reliable differentiation between normal and abnormal behaviour and psychiatric disorders. Findings: Differentiating between normal and abnormal may be a difficult task for a professional treating persons with DD because of the lack of adequate criteria for such differentiation. The problem becomes even more complex when one attempts to differentiate between PB and psychiatric disorder. By approaching the subject from a developmental perspective and by determining the level of the person’s emotional development, insight in subjective person’s experiences was achieved. On the ground of a “good practice” the authors made schemata outlining criteria for differentiation between these constructs. Originality/value: The application of these schemata in the practice made it easier to establish appropriate diagnoses and was favourable for the planning of adequate treatment and support of persons with DD and mental health problems. (Publisher abstract)

Journal article

I-CAN: the classification and prediction of support needs

Authors:
ARNOLD Samuel R.C., RICHES Vivienne Catherine, STANCLIFFE Roger J.
Journal article citation:
Journal of Applied Research in Intellectual Disabilities, 27(2), 2014, pp.97-111.
Publisher:
Wiley-Blackwell

Background: Since 1992, the diagnosis and classification of intellectual disability has been dependent upon three constructs: intelligence, adaptive behaviour and support needs (Luckasson et al. 1992. Mental Retardation: Definition, Classification and Systems of Support. American Association on Intellectual and Developmental Disability, Washington, DC). While the methods and instruments to measure intelligence and adaptive behaviour are well established and generally accepted, the measurement and classification of support needs is still in its infancy. This article explores the measurement and classification of support needs. Method: A study is presented comparing scores on the ICF (WHO, 2001) based I-CAN v4.2 support needs assessment and planning tool with expert clinical judgment using a proposed classification of support needs. A logical classification algorithm was developed and validated on a separate sample. Results: Good internal consistency (range 0.73–0.91, N = 186) and criterion validity (κ = 0.94, n = 49) were found. Conclusions: Further advances in our understanding and measurement of support needs could change the way disability is assessed, described and classified. (Edited publisher abstract)

Journal article

Examining the support needs of ageing family carers in developing future plans for a relative with an intellectual disability

Authors:
TAGGART Laurence, et al
Journal article citation:
Journal of Intellectual Disabilities, 16(3), September 2012, pp.217-234.
Publisher:
Sage
Place of publication:
London

Due to the increased life expectancy of people with intellectual disability, they are now more likely to be living with an ageing family carer. The aim of this study was to examine the support needs of ageing family carers in developing future plans for a relative with an intellectual disability. A mixed methods design was employed. In stage 1, a structured questionnaire was used to collate information on the health, caregiving demands and future planning preferences of 112 parent and sibling carers aged 60–94 years. In stage 2, 19 in-depth semi-structured interviews were undertaken with a sample of carers to explore a range of issues around future planning. Over half of the carers were lone carers, mainly female, with many reporting a wide range of health problems. The main preference was for the person to remain in the family home, with either the family or paid staff to support them. A minority of parent carers preferred the person to move into the home of a sibling, although some favoured the person moving to a residential facility with other people with intellectual disabilities. Four main themes were identified around future planning: unremitting apprehension; the extent of planning; obstacles encountered; and solutions for future planning. Avoidance, lack of guidance and a lack of appropriate residential provision were cited as obstacles to making future plans compounded by the emotional upset experienced by carers in thinking about the future.

Book Full text available online for free

Joint position statement on carers with learning disabilities from the Princess Royal Trust for Carers, Crossroads Care, Mencap, the National Family Carer Network, Who Cares for Us? and Respond

Authors:
PRINCESS ROYAL TRUST FOR CARERS, CROSSROADS CARE
Publisher:
Princess Royal Trust for Carers
Publication year:
2010
Pagination:
4p.
Place of publication:
Woodford Green

This easy read joint position statement was created to help organisations who help carers with learning disabilities to work better together and to help other people to understand the lives of carers with learning disabilities. Using brief bullet points the statement describes what a carer with a learning disability is; explains why it is difficult to know how many carers with learning disabilities there are; what they want; how they could be better supported; and the organisations that currently support them.

Journal article

Health and social needs of people with low intelligence

Authors:
SCHNEIDER Justine, CLEGG Jennifer
Journal article citation:
Mental Health Review Journal, 14(2), June 2009, pp.22-27.
Publisher:
Emerald

This paper asks whether intellectual ability determines an individual's potential to live well and deal with the checks and obstacles that life presents. A secondary analysis of the ONS survey of psychiatric morbidity, 2000 was undertaken. It was fond that people with low intelligence was significantly more likely to be a smoker, have problems with paperwork and be renting their home, and a significant subgroup was more likely to be friendless. The pursuit of social justice and social inclusion may require greater attention to be paid to the health and well-being of people with below-average intelligence.

Journal article

Spirituality, mental health and people with learning disabilities

Authors:
FERGUSON Dave, SCOTT Jayne
Journal article citation:
Advances in Mental Health and Learning Disabilities, 2(2), June 2008, pp.37-41.
Publisher:
Emerald

This article explores the spiritual dimension in mental health care and its relevance to people with learning disabilities. A discussion of the development of a working group to scope the issues in one learning disability service is explored, with practical commentary on the efforts made to gather more information from service providers. The findings from a brief survey are briefly discusses, as well as developments which have ensued to date. The authors conclude that, although spirituality can mean different things to different people, responding to the diverse spiritual needs of service users must take a person-centred and a flexible approach.

Book

Lost in transition?: how to find your way through: an overview of recent transitions research for parents and practitioners

Author:
EVERITT Gabriella
Publisher:
Dimensions
Publication year:
2007
Pagination:
100p.
Place of publication:
Theale

The lack of effective support for young adults with a learning difficulty at transition has been highlighted as a key issue in the learning difficulty sector. Yet, although everybody seems to be talking about it, nothing seems to be changing. It seems we’re still wary of taking the plunge and developing the right kind of services to meet the needs of young people with a learning difficulty today.

Journal article

The use of family therapy for people with learning disabilities

Author:
BAUM Sandra
Journal article citation:
Advances in Mental Health and Learning Disabilities, 1(2), June 2007, pp.8-13.
Publisher:
Emerald

The application of the systemic approach in working with people with learning disabilities, their families and their support systems has grown over the last decade in the UK. The way in which the family, support system and wider contexts interact with each other may affect how the person with learning disabilities presents for help to services, and will also affect engagement, expectations and possible solutions to crises. If the relationship in focus is the person's behaviour in a family setting, family therapy may be useful to explore relational difficulties within the family. This article considers the issues that might benefit from using this model, explains how to included the adult with learning disabilities in the process, and summarises the evidence of its effectiveness.

Book Full text available online for free

No one knows: offenders with learning difficulties and learning disabilities: easy read version

Author:
PRISON REFORM TRUST
Publisher:
Prison Reform Trust
Publication year:
2007
Pagination:
4p.
Place of publication:
London

No One Knows is a UK-wide programme led by the Prison Reform Trust that aims to effect change by exploring and publicising the experiences of people with learning difficulties and learning disabilities who come into contact with the criminal justice system. The programme runs until October 2008, it is supported by The Diana, Princess of Wales Memorial Fund and is chaired by the Rt Hon the Baroness Joyce Quin, former Prisons Minster for England and Wales. This  paper details the work of the  Prison Reform Trust and outlines the prevalence and associated needs compiled to provide background information for No One Knows.

Key to icons

  • Free resource Free resource
  • Journal article Journal article
  • Book Book
  • Digital media Digital media
  • Journal Journal

Give us your feedback

Social Care Online continues to be developed in response to user feedback.

Contact us with your comments and for any problems using the website.

Sign up/login for more

Register/login to use standard search filters, access resource links, advanced search and email alerts