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Journal article

Examples of individual supported living for adults with intellectual disability

Authors:
COCKS Errol, et al
Journal article citation:
Journal of Intellectual Disabilities, 20(2), 2016, pp.100-108.
Publisher:
Sage
Place of publication:
London

Background: This article provides a qualitative account of four models of support for adults with intellectual disability in individual supported living (ISL) arrangements. Materials and Methods: Completion of the first 50 evaluations of 150 arrangements for the third phase of the ISL project provided the examples. Results: Four approaches are described: living alone, co-residency, relationship and host family. Within each type, wide variations occur particularly based on security of tenure, formal and informal support and management variations. Conclusion: Fifty evaluations so far illustrated a wide range of approaches to ISL, providing evidence of the critical importance of the formal and informal support environment and reinforcing the contention that ISL is appropriate for people with high support needs. (Publisher abstract)

Journal article

The Social Information Processing Model as a framework for explaining frequent aggression in adults with mild to moderate intellectual disabilities: a systematic review of the evidence

Authors:
LARKIN Peter, JAHODA Andrew, MacMAHON Ken
Journal article citation:
Journal of Applied Research in Intellectual Disabilities, 26(5), 2013, pp.447-465.
Publisher:
Wiley-Blackwell

There is an established evidence base con-cerning the use of anger management interventions with violent offenders who have intellectual disabilities. However, there has been limited research investigating the role of social cognitive factors underpinning problems of aggression. Psychosocial sources of agg-ression in the non-disabled population are generally discussed using Social Information Processing (SIP) models. A systematic review of the available evidence was carried out to establish whether SIP offers a useful explanatory model for understanding the contribution of social cognitive factors to problems of aggression presented by people with intellectual disabilities. Whilst research relating to the SIP model remains sparse for this population, there was evidence for different patterns of processing between aggressive and non-aggressive individuals. Group diff-erences included interpretation of emotional cues, inter-personal attributions and beliefs about the outcomes of aggressive behaviour. The future direction of SIP research with people who have intellectual disabilities is discussed, along with the possibility of using this framework to help build on current initiatives to develop individually tailored interventions to work at a cognitive level with those who are aggressive and offend. (Edited publisher abstract)

Journal article

Family quality of life: moving from measurement to application

Authors:
ZUNA Nina I., TURNBULL Ann, SUMMERS Jean Ann
Journal article citation:
Journal of Policy and Practice in Intellectual Disabilities, 6(1), March 2009, pp.25-31.
Publisher:
Wiley-Blackwell

Thus, the authors propose a theory of family quality of life (FQoL) designed to explain how various concepts - systems, performance, individuals, and family units - influence variations in FQoL. In defining each of the concepts, they describe the theory's application within the context of a family vignette, illustrating how professionals might apply theoretical propositions to their practice. In their application, they stress that the application of the FQoL theory they presented is not an end but rather a developmental stage that leads to further refinement of the FQoL theory. The application and development of this theory is a reciprocal process among researchers, practitioners, and families. Further, their FQoL theoretical model can serve to enable practitioners to examine which family, ecological, and programmatic variables are amenable to change to positively impact FQoL. Given this, they assert that FQoL is not a static concept but, instead, ebbs and flows during the course of raising a child with a disability. They call for further collaborative work among workers to continually improve the FQoL theory and to successfully implement it in practice.

Journal article

The relationship between challenging behaviour and mental ill-health in people with intellectual disabilities: a review of current theories and evidence

Author:
ALLEN David
Journal article citation:
Journal of Intellectual Disabilities, 12(4), December 2008, pp.267-294.
Publisher:
Sage
Place of publication:
London

Challenging behaviours and problems of mental ill-health are common amongst people with intellectual disabilities. The article examines conceptual similarities and differences between these conditions, examines the data on comorbidity, and explores possible hypothetical relationships between behavioural and psychiatric disorder in this population. While there is little evidence at present to suggest that many of the challenging behaviours seen in people with intellectual disabilities are underpinned by problems of mental ill-health, only qualified conclusions are possible because of limitations in the quality and scope of existing research. A conceptual model for looking at the risk variables that may contribute to both conditions is suggested, and requirements for future research and current multi-disciplinary practice are outlined.

Journal article

Real jobs with real wages

Author:
GARBUTT Ruth
Journal article citation:
Learning Disability Today, 8(2), May 2008, pp.19-22.
Publisher:
Pavilion
Place of publication:
Hove

People with learning disabilities are often excluded from employment. CHANGE is one organisation that is leading the way on a rights-based approach to the employment of people with learning disabilities. This article discusses the employment model used by CHANGE which includes: use of co-workers; tapping into people's strengths; having a resources worker; providing skills training and utilising volunteers.

Journal article

Relapse prevention with intellectually disabled sexual offenders

Authors:
KEELING Jenny A., ROSE John L.
Journal article citation:
Sexual Abuse a Journal of Research and Treatment, 17(4), October 2005, pp.407-423.
Publisher:
Sage

This paper discusses the sexual offending characteristics and pathways of intellectually disabled sexual offenders. From a review of the literature, the authors suggests that intellectually disabled sexual offenders may be most likely to offend via the automatic pathway or the avoidant-passive pathway. The potential treatment implications of the self-regulation model for intellectually disabled sexual offenders is discussed, as well as the need for empirical evaluation with regards to the application of this model to the intellectually disabled sexual offender population.

Journal article

Easing the way into adulthood

Authors:
DOBSON Jonathan, JAY Nadine
Journal article citation:
Community Living, 13(4), April 2000, pp.18-19.
Publisher:
Hexagon Publishing

Reports on the CREDO (Creating Real and Equal Development Opportunities) Project, which aims to develop good practice and planning with young disabled people as they look forward to adult life.

Journal article

Learning difficulties

Author:
WARD Linda
Journal article citation:
Research Matters, 3, April 1997, pp.10-12.
Publisher:
Community Care

Controversy is still raging over whether village communities for people with learning difficulties are a better option then living within mainstream society. New research evaluates and compares the different accommodation options. Also looks at how help is at hand for researchers to help them share their knowledge with people with learning disabilities themselves.

Journal article

Jobs with the boys

Author:
HOUGHTON Alex
Journal article citation:
Care Weekly, 8.4.94, 1994, p.14.

Looks at the different forms that supported employment for people with learning disabilities can take. Contrasts the model of one individual in an employment setting with support staff to help them with the concept of a social firm where a number of people with learning disabilities work together.

Journal article

Social role valorisation and the model of human occupation: a comparative analysis for work with people with a learning disability in the community

Author:
PLATTS Lesley
Journal article citation:
British Journal of Occupational Therapy, 56(8), August 1993, pp.278-282.
Publisher:
College of Occupational Therapists

Presents overviews of Social Role Valorisation as presented by Wolfensberger and the Model of Human Occupation as suggested by Kielhofner, et al. and contrasts their underlying fundamental beliefs.

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