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Journal article

Thematic analysis of the effectiveness of an inpatient mindfulness group for adults with intellectual disabilities

Authors:
YILDIRAN Hatice, HOLT Rachel R.
Journal article citation:
British Journal of Learning Disabilities, 43(1), 2015, pp.49-54.
Publisher:
Wiley-Blackwell

The study focused on the effectiveness of group mindfulness for people with intellectual disabilities in an assessment and treatment unit. Six participants with mild or moderate intellectual disabilities were interviewed using semi-structured interviews. The interviews focused on identifying the benefits and difficulties of using mindfulness. The interviews were analysed using thematic analysis. Five themes were identified which were categorised into interpersonal ('helping people') and intrapersonal ('focusing on one particular thing'; 'improving skills'; 'get rid of all nasty bad stuff you want to get rid of') benefits. The theme 'bit too late to teach old dog new tricks' captured the difficulties encountered. The themes highlighted that people with intellectual disabilities were able to form an understanding of mindfulness and were able to benefit from the intervention. (Publisher abstract)

Journal article

Strategic thinking

Authors:
DAVIES Jill, BURKE Christine
Journal article citation:
Mental Health Today, September 2012, pp.12-14.
Publisher:
Pavilion
Place of publication:
Hove

People with learning disabilities are more likely to develop mental health problems compared to the general population. The Government’s mental health strategy, ‘No health without mental health’ (DH, 2011), makes several references to people with learning disabilities. In particular, it highlights the importance of mental health services for people with learning disabilities and autism, the need to ensure that mainstream services are inclusive to this group, including that staff have appropriate skills and can provide reasonable adjustments to meet individual needs. The strategy also mentions the need for early intervention to prevent later problems for children with special educational needs and disabilities, including those who have underlying or associated mental health problems. In 2012, the Government issued an accompanying implementation framework that aims to translate the ideals of the strategy into concrete actions on a local level. This article discusses what the implementation framework means for people with learning disabilities. It shows that, despite the strategy highlighting the needs of people with learning disabilities, the framework offers little specifically for this group. This raises concern that this group will remain off the radar for those in mainstream services and organisations that could support them to maintain their mental health and wellbeing.

Journal article

Strategic thinking

Authors:
DAVIES Jill, BURKE Christine
Journal article citation:
Learning Disability Today, October 2012, pp.16-17.
Publisher:
Pavilion
Place of publication:
Hove

People with learning disabilities are more likely to develop mental health problems compared to the general population. The Government’s mental health strategy, ‘No health without mental health’ (DH, 2011), makes several references to people with learning disabilities. In particular, it highlights the importance of mental health services for people with learning disabilities and autism, the need to ensure that mainstream services are inclusive to this group, including that staff have appropriate skills and can provide reasonable adjustments to meet individual needs. The strategy also mentions the need for early intervention to prevent later problems for children with special educational needs and disabilities, including those who have underlying or associated mental health problems. In 2012, the Government issued an accompanying implementation framework that aims to translate the ideals of the strategy into concrete actions on a local level. This article discusses what the implementation framework means for people with learning disabilities. It shows that, despite the strategy highlighting the needs of people with learning disabilities, the framework offers little specifically for this group. This raises concern that this group will remain off the radar for those in mainstream services and organisations that could support them to maintain their mental health and wellbeing.

Journal article

Understanding emotional and psychological harm of people with intellectual disability: an evolving framework

Authors:
ROBINSON Sally, CHENOWETH Lesley
Journal article citation:
Journal of Adult Protection, 14(3), 2012, pp.110-121.
Publisher:
Emerald

A framework for better understanding the emotional and psychological abuse and neglect of people with intellectual disability was developed to support a narrative study with people with intellectual disability, families and other supporters about the lived experience of this maltreatment in disability accommodation services in Australia. This paper describes the underpinning review of emotional and psychological abuse and neglect and the evolving new framework. A review of existing understandings of this form of abuse in research and policy was conducted, and a framework developed and tested for “trustworthiness”. Based on the review, a framework of emotional and psychological abuse and neglect is presented. It centres on the misuse of power and control, details behaviours and interactions which can occur when it is inflicted, and is tested against the experiences of people who have experienced this sort of abuse and neglect. The authors concluded that further research is needed to test the robustness of the framework.

Journal article

Implementing a patient centred recovery approach in a secure learning disabilities service

Authors:
ESAN Fola, et al
Journal article citation:
Journal of Learning Disabilities and Offending Behaviour, 3(1), 2012, pp.24-35.
Publisher:
Emerald

This article examines how a patient centred recovery approach was implemented in a secure learning disabilities service. The Recovery Star; a measure of individual recovery, was adopted for use among the patients. Staff underwent training on the use of the Recovery Star tool after which a multidisciplinary steering group made some modifications to the tool. It was found that implementing a recovery approach with the Recovery Star tool was a beneficial process for the service. Key workers working with patients thought that the structure of the Recovery Star tool opened up avenues for discussing topics that may otherwise have not been discussed as fully. The authors concluded that the Recovery Star tool, embedded in a care programme approach process, equips patients and staff for measuring the recovery journey.

Digital Media

Psychology for people with learning disabilities

Authors:
SOUTH BIRMINGHAM PRIMARY CARE TRUST (Producer), OGI Laura (producer)
Publisher:
South Birmingham Primary Care Trust
Publication year:
2010
Pagination:
(34 mins.), DVD
Place of publication:
Birmingham

Consisting of a DVD and booklet, this project pack explains the various psychological services which are available to people with learning disabilities. It is written as a working handbook for both family and professional carers. The resource outlines what clinical psychologists do, how they work and who they may of benefit to. It provides a useful distinction between the various psychologists a person may come into contact with when accessing services. The bulk of the booklet is dedicated to a series of two-page descriptions of common clinical approaches which may be employed when working with a person with learning disabilities: psychodynamic psychotherapy, positive behavioural support, cognitive analytic therapy, cognitive behavioural therapy and family therapy. The DVD attempts to orientate users to what is likely to happen when they see a psychologist. It mirrors the booklet in structure and outlines the main psychological approaches offered to people with learning disabilities by Birmingham PCT. In addition there is a chapter titled “Service User Forum” in which members of a service user advocacy groups ask questions relating to the practicalities of seeing a psychologist.

Journal article

Mental health services for people with a learning disability

Author:
CUMELLA Stuart
Journal article citation:
Advances in Mental Health and Learning Disabilities, 3(2), June 2009, pp.8-14.
Publisher:
Emerald

Many parts of the world are developing specialist mental health services for people with a learning disability. Government policy in England appears to favour a move in the opposite direction. The general aims of mental health services for people with a learning disability are indeed similar to those of the rest of the population, but distinctive clinical skills are required to assess, treat and support effectively people with a learning disability who have mental health and/or behavioural problems. It is argued that there is therefore a need for specialist services to meet the needs of this population, which should include acute admission facilities, outreach services in the community and long-term support.

Journal article

Mental health services for individuals with intellectual disabilities in Canada: findings from a national survey

Authors:
LUNSKY Y, et al
Journal article citation:
Journal of Applied Research in Intellectual Disabilities, 20(5), September 2007, pp.439-447.
Publisher:
Wiley-Blackwell

This study aimed to document both the range of mental health services available to individuals with intellectual disabilities across Canada and the perceived service gaps. A 30-item questionnaire was developed that included questions on mental healthcare services for children, adolescents and adults with intellectual disabilities. This survey was sent to key informants in the 10 Canadian provinces and three territories. More than half of the respondents reported that generic mental health providers were poorly equipped to meet the needs of individuals with intellectual disabilities and mental health issues. Certain specialized services (inpatient treatment, emergency room expertise) were reported to exist by less than half of the respondents. Waitlists for specialized services were typically four months or longer. Respondents thought that training for staff and professionals was very important. Some specialized services for individuals with intellectual disabilities and mental health issues were reported to exist in Canada but the need for more specialized services and further training was identified. Documentation of these service gaps should lead to further efforts in Canada for the improvement in services and developing policy.

Book Full text available online for free

Count me in: results of the 2006 national census of inpatients in mental health and learning disability services in England and Wales

Author:
HEALTHCARE COMMISSION
Publisher:
Healthcare Commission
Publication year:
2007
Pagination:
72p., tables
Place of publication:
London

The Count Me In census 2006 was a joint initiative by the Healthcare Commission, the Mental Health Act Commission and the National Institute for Mental Health in England. It aimed to provide accurate figures on the numbers of inpatients in mental health and learning disability services in England and Wales. This report presents the key findings from the census.

Journal article

Art as therapy: an effective way of promoting positive mental health?

Author:
HEENAN Deidre
Journal article citation:
Disability and Society, 21(2), March 2006, pp.179-191.
Publisher:
Taylor and Francis,

The aim of this study is to evaluate the contribution that creative arts can play in promoting positive mental health and well-being. The research is based on a case study of an innovative art therapy programme delivered by a community-based mental health organisation in Northern Ireland, as part of a supported recovery programme. The study reported here explored the experiences and perceptions of the service users through in-depth interviews and focus groups. The art as therapy course was credited with improvements in self-esteem and self-confidence. It provided a safe space for reflection on mental health issues. Participants described the programme as cathartic and a springboard for engagement in a wide range of further projects. It is concluded that this type of project which addresses mental health issues in a supportive, positive, non-clinical environment can encourage and facilitate empowerment and recovery through accessible creative programmes. However, to date these programmes are time-limited, small-scale and marginal to the approach adopted by statutory service providers.

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