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Journal article

A reflection on PostModernism and the transformation of failure in learning disability services within the independent public sector at the beginning of the 21st Century

Author:
DAY Steve
Journal article citation:
British Journal of Learning Disabilities, 35(1), March 2007, pp.38-42.
Publisher:
Wiley-Blackwell

The author discusses the transformation of learning disability services in light of the postmodern world. He places the transformation of services for people with learning disability, within the context of a global market place. He argues that change in the construction and administration of both the National Health Service and Social Services has, and is, having a profound effect on the lives of people with learning disabilities. Those changes have come about, in part, due to a recognition of past failures. The author has worked in Learning Disability Services for 19 years, and has seen in that time British society slowly begin to recognize people with learning disabilities amongst its population. There is a creaking door opening for people with learning disabilities, providing them recognition within the PostModern construct of fragmented societies. It is argued that against such a backdrop there is a real chance of the failure to meet the needs of people with learning disabilities becoming transformed.

Journal article

Inclusion or outcomes? Tensions in the involvement of people with learning disabilities in strategic planning

Authors:
FYSON Rachel, FOX Liz
Journal article citation:
Disability and Society, 29(2), 2014, pp.239-254.
Publisher:
Taylor and Francis,

Social inclusion is a key principle that underpins the provision of services for people with learning disabilities in England. Learning Disability Partnership Boards, which are responsible for local strategic planning of learning disability services, hold a particular role in promoting inclusion since they are required both to operate inclusively and to achieve inclusive outcomes. This study sought to explore the extent to which these ambitions for inclusion were being achieved. It consisted of three phases: a scoping exercise to elicit the views of key stakeholders; a postal survey of Partnership Boards (response rate 51%); and semi-structured interviews with Partnership Boards members in six local authorities. Findings suggest that Partnership Boards are struggling to fulfil their dual role, with tensions emerging between the desire to operate in fully inclusive ways and the ability to affect strategic change within local services. (Publisher abstract)

Book Full text available online for free

Learning disabilities: good practice project

Authors:
HOUGH Jo, MARTIN Kerry
Publisher:
Great Britain. Department of Health
Publication year:
2013
Pagination:
57
Place of publication:
London

This report gives people who commission, design and deliver services a better understanding of how to improve the lives of people with learning disabilities. It is partly based on these good practice indicators: co-production; a capabilities approach to disability; community capacity building; a move towards more integrated services; and a commitment to personalisation. It presents six examples of good practice: Public Health Norfolk & Equal Lives (formerly Norfolk Coalition of Disabled People) and its provision of easy-to-access information on local health services; the Quality Checking project in Gloucestershire; London Borough of Hackney and Advance Support and supported living for people with complex needs; MacIntyre Care in Oxfordshire, representative of transition support for young people with complex needs; the Open University’s Social History of Learning Disability Group on sharing life stories; and Merseycare NHS Rebuild Service, which offers support for people with Down’s Syndrome and early onset dementia. It gives briefer details for other shortlisted projects. The report also includes an EasyRead summary. The project was completed under an action from ‘Transforming Care: A national response to Winterbourne View Hospital’. (Original abstract)

Book

Supporting people with learning disability and dementia: a training resource pack for managers, team leaders and trainers

Authors:
CHAPMAN Alan, CURTICE Lisa
Publisher:
University of Stirling. Dementia Services Development Centre; Scottish Consortium for Learning Disability
Publication year:
2008
Pagination:
205p.
Place of publication:
Stirling

This pack is intended to help managers and teams to consider wide practice issues with team member when a person with learning disability develops dementia. It is designed to be a useful focus for learning within a team and addresses key aspects of the values, knowledge, understanding and skills required of a social care worker by the Scottish Social Services Council, but also has relevance to other professional groups. Part1 describes the knowledge base, Part 2 gives a best practice case study, and part three describes seven "discussions": working with the person, communicating, seeing meaning in behaviour, responding to behaviours, pathways to support, positive risk assessment and management, and teams and multidisciplinary working.

Journal article

Commissioning services for people with learning disabilities in Scotland: linking evidence and practice

Author:
CAMPBELL Martin
Journal article citation:
British Journal of Learning Disabilities, 37(1), March 2009, pp.28-33.
Publisher:
Wiley-Blackwell

This paper describes the development of some practical guidance for people involved in commissioning services for individuals with learning disabilities. A national conference was organised in November 2005 to look at the question of 'What works in learning disability services?', i.e. what approaches have proven effectiveness in the planning, commissioning and provision of services for people with learning disabilities. This was followed by four workshops around Scotland to seek practitioners' views on commissioning, at a strategic and at an individual level. From this, written and online guidelines were devised, based on seven steps with a number of associated key questions. These guidelines aim to inform commissioners about available research and good practice, and provide a method of recording the basis on which commissioners make their decisions for models of care and their experiences in a way that could be shared with others.

Book Full text available online for free

A hospital or a home? Findings from themed visits to NHS and private sector wards for people with learning disabilities

Author:
MENTAL WELFARE COMMISSION FOR SCOTLAND
Publisher:
Mental Welfare Commission for Scotland
Publication year:
2008
Pagination:
16p.
Place of publication:
Edinburgh

The Commission undertook a themed visit to all learning disability in-patient units during the 2007-08 visiting programme. The Commission visited 39 facilities across Scotland from 25 October to 7 November 2007. Prior to the visits, health boards were asked to provide some information about the wards in their areas. Staff were asked a series of questions about the people living in the ward on the day of the visit and about how care and treatment was provided. Commission staff met with individual patients and some relatives and carers. The Commission was particularly interested in seeing how assessment of individual need was taking place and the ways identified needs were being met. Commission staff also looked for evidence within files that would indicate how individual people and carers were being involved in decisions about current and future care. Key recommendations are outlined.

Journal article

Manchester's best-kept secret

Authors:
BLYTH Craig, CHAPMAN Rohhss
Journal article citation:
Learning Disability Today, June 2008, pp.36-37.
Publisher:
Pavilion
Place of publication:
Hove

A Learning Disabilities Studies Degree was launched in Manchester in September 2001, aimed at students who were already working, or wanted to begin a career working, with people with learning disabilities. Discusses how service users have been involved in the Steering Group delivering degree.

Journal article

Responsive services for people with learning disabilities from minority ethnic communities

Authors:
CATON Sue, et al
Journal article citation:
British Journal of Learning Disabilities, 35(4), December 2007, pp.229-235.
Publisher:
Wiley-Blackwell

This article reports the results of a postal questionnaire survey carried out to explore the responsiveness and appropriateness of services for people with learning disabilities from minority ethnic communities in the North West of England. Twenty-one learning disability service commissioners or service providers completed the questionnaire. Results indicated that services were influenced by legislation and guidelines which help services develop specific programmes. Organizational culture also played a role in how services respond. Respondents reported that a variety of new services were currently being developed. Individual staff members and good organizational support were most cited as the factors that facilitate effective policies, practices, and procedures whereas problems regarding funding were most frequently cited as barriers. The respondents detailed evidence of some work being carried out at the grass roots level, but the responses indicate that a core theme is the marginalization of the issue of meeting the needs of people from minority ethnic groups.

Journal article Full text available online for free

Worth target for a Wanless

Author:
HONOUR Heather
Journal article citation:
Community Care, 9.8.07, 2007, pp.30-31.
Publisher:
Reed Business Information

As demand for services for people with learning disabilities grows and suitable services fail to keep pace, the author looks at how a Wanless-style review in the area could be useful.

Book Full text available online for free

Adults with learning disabilities implementation of 'The same as you?' Scotland 2006

Author:
SCOTLAND. Scottish Executive National Statistics
Publisher:
Scotland. Scottish Executive National Statistics
Publication year:
2007
Pagination:
17p.
Place of publication:
Edinburgh

National figures for services provided by local authorities in Scotland for adults with learning disabilities are presented. All figures for 2006 relate to the week ending 10 September 2006 and are provisional. This publication is a result of The same as you? review of services for people with learning disabilities, published in May 2000. Its 29 recommendations for developing learning disability services set out a programme for change over 10 years.

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