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Journal article Full text available online for free

Shifting up a gear

Author:
SNELL Janet
Journal article citation:
Community Care, 26.07.07, 2007, pp.30-31.
Publisher:
Reed Business Information

Many partnership boards for people with learning disabilities have focused on ensuring users are fully involved but the best ones are really changing people's lives. This article looks at how to do things better and highlights some examples of good practice.

Book Full text available online for free

Keys to partnership: working together to make a difference in people's lives

Author:
GREAT BRITAIN. Department of Health
Publisher:
Great Britain. Department of Health
Publication year:
2002
Pagination:
84p.
Place of publication:
London

This document aims to provide practical ideas and suggestions on developing partnerships in adult services for people with learning disabilities. Much of the content will also be of relevance to children's services.

Journal article

Multi-agency working in support of people with intellectual disabilities

Author:
McCONKEY Roy
Journal article citation:
Journal of Intellectual Disabilities, 9(3), September 2005, pp.193-207.
Publisher:
Sage
Place of publication:
London

Although health and social services in Northern Ireland are jointly commissioned and delivered, the recent emphasis in government policy on multi-agency working for people with learning disabilities has not extended as yet to the region. A qualitative research study, with informants drawn from a range of sectors and agencies beyond health and social services, nonetheless identified at least 24 different organizations who were participating in some form of joint working. It identified a wide range of organisations working together at regional, area and local levels. The organisations covered a range of functions beyond health, social services and education, and included the police service and district councils. The benefits were seen to outweigh potential difficulties and respondents identified the factors that they had found facilitated joint working as well as the obstacles to it. These centred on the need to build relationships among participants, creating opportunities for partnership working to occur and increasing the capacity of individuals and organizations to work together. The need for further evaluation and research into system change and user involvement is highlighted.

Journal article Full text available online for free

Very accommodating

Author:
HOPKINS Graham
Journal article citation:
Community Care, 16.06.05, 2005, pp.40-41.
Publisher:
Reed Business Information

Reports on how a small team in Hounslow, west London, is able to provide a highly related Supporting People programme.

Journal article

Progress on participation?: self-advocate involvement in learning disability partnership boards

Authors:
FYSON Rachel, McBRIDE Gordon, MYERS Brian
Journal article citation:
Tizard Learning Disability Review, 9(3), July 2004, pp.27-36.
Publisher:
Emerald

Aimed to gather information about the objective and subjective experiences of self-advocates attending learning disability partnership boards, in order to promote effective practices. Findings show that although people with learning disabilities were present at meetings a variety of barriers limited their ability to participate actively. Problems included lack of financial and practical help as well as the limited availability of accessible information. There were, however, examples of good practice, and many self-advocates were pleased at how local authorities were beginning to implement effective partnership working practices. Ways of supporting self-advocates and others with learning disabilities to fulfil a truly representative, rather than merely symbolic, function at meetings are discussed.

Journal article

Identifying the invisible: the experiences of prostitution among persons with intellectual disabilities: implications for social work

Authors:
KUOSMANEN Jari, STARKE Mikaela
Journal article citation:
Journal of Social Work, 13(2), 2013, pp.123-140.
Publisher:
Sage

Although professionals have long been aware of issues around prostitution and intellectual disabilities, little research has focused on this area. This article describes and analyses how employees working in specialised prostitution units, the police, social services, special school classes, and care workers in homes for people with intellectual disabilities detect and deal with prostitution among these groups. The data were obtained through six focus group interviews in the Gothenburg region, involving 18 informants who had experience of working with people with intellectual disabilities and people working with prostitution. The responses revealed that organisational specialisation in different authorities and services makes it difficult to identify and work with this group. Clients with complex problems tend to find themselves falling between the jurisdiction of different authorities, and as a result many do not receive the support they need. Each organisation is regulated by specific legislation, regulations, forms of knowledge and normative assumptions. Professionals working with people with intellectual disabilities have difficulties in detecting prostitution among their clients, whilst those who work with prostitution lack the knowledge and methods to work with intellectual disabilities. At the same time, social work with these individuals has to balance the tension between the client’s right to self-determination and the professionals’ responsibilities for their well-being.

Book

Learning disability policy and practice: changing lives?

Author:
WILLIAMS Valerie
Publisher:
Palgrave Macmillan
Publication year:
2012
Pagination:
248p.
Place of publication:
Basingstoke

This book explores working with people with learning disabilities at all life stages. With contributions from people with learning disabilities and their families, its person-centred approach illustrates how policy can be translated into practice with life-changing consequences. It outlines the role of key agencies and professionals, and emphasises the importance and relevance of partnership working. The book promotes reflection on some of key policy concepts, and to critically evaluate each one in relation to the evidence about the lives of people with learning disabilities. Contents include: introduction and overview people with learning disabilities; taking a human rights approach to health; inclusion in education partnership with families identity, relationships, sexuality and parenting; person-centred planning for life making decisions about where to live; getting good support to be in control citizenship; and inclusion in communities promises, practices and real lives references index.

Journal article

Valuing People: family matters ten years on

Authors:
COOPER Viv, WARD Cally
Journal article citation:
Tizard Learning Disability Review, 16(2), April 2011, pp.44-48.
Publisher:
Emerald

It is ten years since Valuing People promised a ‘new deal’ for family carers. Valuing People was explicitly concerned to ensure a cultural shift in the way services worked with and conceptualised the role of family carers. It included specific objectives for involving families in local partnership boards, providing better support for them in their caring role and investing in family leadership nationally, regionally and locally. This article considers why there was a need for a more family-focused approach to support. It then discusses the advances over the last decade towards meeting the objectives of Valuing People. It concludes that despite the positive policy developments it would be dangerous to be complacent; there is still a need to continue investing in families and people with learning disabilities to ensure that the gains of the past decade are not lost.

Book Full text available online for free

Good Learning Disability Partnership Boards: 'making it happen for everyone'

Author:
GREAT BRITAIN. Department of Health
Publisher:
Great Britain. Department of Health
Publication year:
2009
Pagination:
38p.
Place of publication:
London

This good practice guidance has been developed to help Learning Disability Partnership Boards to oversee the monitoring and delivery of Valuing People Now. The contents includes local governance arrangements, membership of Partnership Boards, good and effective meetings, work programmes, performance and financial management, and communication and awareness raising. Best practice examples and a self-assessment template setting out the range of local data that Partnership Boards can access to inorder to assess progress locally are also provided.

Book Full text available online for free

What's in working together?

Authors:
LOFTHOUSE DI, BARNES Laura, MENDONCA Pat
Publisher:
Great Britain. Department of Health
Publication year:
2006
Pagination:
31p.
Place of publication:
London

‘Keys to Partnership’ is the name of a new report written by the Department of Health. It is about everyone working together to make life better for people with learning difficulties and their families. Keys to Partnership aims to provide practical ideas and suggestions on developing partnerships in adult services for people with learning disabilities. Much of the content will also be of relevance to children's services.

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