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Book Full text available online for free

Healthy eyes, teeth and ears

Author:
PUBLIC HEALTH ENGLAND
Publisher:
Public Health England
Publication year:
2017
Pagination:
3
Place of publication:
London

This factsheet provides information on how social care staff can support people with learning disabilities to look after their eyes, teeth and ears. It is the fifth in a series of factsheets which show how social care staff can support the health needs of people with learning disabilities. The leaflet also includes a link to a supporting slide set that can be used by social care staff as a training resource. (Edited publisher abstract)

Book Full text available online for free

Learning disability health toolkit

Author:
TURNING POINT
Publisher:
Turning Point
Publication year:
2016
Pagination:
111
Place of publication:
Leamington Spa

This toolkit is designed to help making sure that people with learning disabilities are healthy and well, improving the knowledge, skills and confidence of staff in advocating and monitoring the healthcare needs of people with learning difficulties. The toolkit provides essential information around consent and capacity, primary and secondary care and mental health. It describes a number of common medical conditions, including conditions relating to men’s health and women’s health, and explains in detail what to look for, what actions to take and how to monitor effectively. (Edited publisher abstract)

Journal article

Learning disabilities: reducing inequalities

Author:
MARSHALL-TATE Karina
Journal article citation:
Nursing Times, 111(49), 2015, pp.12-13.
Publisher:
Nursing Times

Nurses without a learning disability qualification can feel unsure of how best to care for patients with a learning disability. This article outlines five small changes that nurses can make to improve healthcare and reduce avoidable, premature deaths of people with learning disabilities. These are: identifying people with learning disabilities, anticipating their needs and making adjustments; diagnosing and treating illness quickly; coordinating care; adhering to the Mental Capacity Act 2005, and listening to people with learning disabilities and their families. A case study shows how small changes can improve care. (Edited publisher abstract)

Journal article

Numbers and policy in care for people with intellectual disability in the United Kingdom

Author:
GLOVER Gyles
Journal article citation:
Journal of Applied Research in Intellectual Disabilities, 28(1), 2015, pp.3-11.
Publisher:
Wiley-Blackwell

Background: Statements or commitments making use of numbers have an important place in government policy. They appear at all stages of the policy process: campaigning, formulation, monitoring and evaluation. Many types of source are involved including research studies, national survey information, routine operational data collections and special systems devised to monitor particular initiatives. Method: The paper presents examples of policy uses of numerical evidence, and some sources of data that have been used to support them in the field of care for people with intellectual developmental disability in England. Conclusions: Different levels of precision or coverage are required at different stages of the process. Different types of numerical data are appropriate at the various stages of the policy process. (Publisher abstract)

Journal article

Premature deaths - how many could be avoided?

Authors:
MARRIOTT Anna, HESLOP Pauline
Journal article citation:
Community Living, 27(1), 2013, pp.26-27.
Publisher:
Hexagon Publishing

An inquiry into premature deaths among people with learning disabilities revealed that over a third could have been avoided through good quality health care. The authors, who were part of the research team, report on their findings. (Publisher abstract)

Journal article

A helping hand

Author:
PENFOLD Julie
Journal article citation:
Learning Disability Today, December 2012, pp.12-13.
Publisher:
Pavilion
Place of publication:
Hove

Inequalities in the standard of healthcare for people with learning disabilities (LD) has been an issue in hospitals for some time, but hospitals in West Sussex are addressing this with recent developments. For example, a computer-based tracking system enables patients with LD to receive specialist support based on their care needs – when a person with LD arrives at the hospital, they are immediately flagged on the system to alert a team of specialist nurses. Additionally, a six page ‘passport’ provides essential information about the person with LD, usually completed by the patient’s carer, and advises hospital staff on all matters regarding the persons health.

Journal article

Caring for a daughter with intellectual disabilities in managing menstruation: a mother's perspective

Authors:
CHOU Yueh-Ching, LU Zxy-Yann Jane
Journal article citation:
Journal of Intellectual and Developmental Disability, 37(1), March 2012, pp.1-10.
Publisher:
Informa Healthcare

Parents and carers of women with intellectual disability (ID) may encounter difficulties when dealing with menstruation management. The focus of research in this area has been largely on reducing family carer burden by preventing menstruation through the use of menstrual suppression medication or surgery. The aim of this qualitative study was to explore mothers' experiences and perceptions of managing their daughters' menstruation. Twelve Taiwanese mothers of 13 daughters with ID were interviewed to explore their experiences of providing help to their daughters with high support needs during menstruation. All the mothers reported that their daughters needed complete menstrual assistance. Support networks were limited and mothers developed their own strategies for managing their daughter's menstruation. Surgical hysterectomy or use of medication to cease or postpone menstrual bleeding was never considered. The financial cost of menstrual pads and nappies was significant. The article concludes that both an appropriate allowance for families involved in the menstrual care of women with ID and access to appropriate support are needed. More information and educational programmes need to be provided to relevant professionals and carers.

Journal article

Commentary on "The Confidential Inquiry into the deaths of people with learning disabilities: the story so far"

Author:
DAWKINS Beverley
Journal article citation:
Tizard Learning Disability Review, 16(5), 2011, pp.26-28.
Publisher:
Emerald

The National Officer for Profound and Multiple Learning Disabilities at Mencap considers in this article the potential impact of the Confidential Inquiry into the deaths of people with learning disabilities and the process of conducting the Confidential Inquiry as outlined in an article by Pauline Heslop and Anna Marriott (Ibid). The commentary discusses the Mencap report Death by Indifference, which exposed examples of unequal health care for people with learning disabilities and was one of the reports contributing to the call for the Confidential Inquiry. It also debates whether and how the inquiry process will address the issues of indifference and discrimination documented in the Mencap report. The author suggests that, as well as the findings of the inquiry, political will to change the way health services are delivered to people with learning disabilities in the future will be crucial.

Journal article

The Confidential Inquiry into the deaths of people with learning disabilities - the story so far

Authors:
HESLOP Pauline, MARRIOTT Anna
Journal article citation:
Tizard Learning Disability Review, 16(5), 2011, pp.18-25.
Publisher:
Emerald

A Confidential Inquiry to review the deaths of all people with learning disabilities from the age of 4 onwards in Gloucestershire and the Avon area, and to determine whether the deaths of people with learning disabilities are premature or not, was commissioned by the Department of Health in 2010. Its main aim is to improve the standard and quality of care for people with learning disabilities and ultimately their health outcomes. It has been commissioned to run until March 2013. This paper by 2 participants in the work of the Confidential Inquiry outlines the process, covering the background, the team, and the inquiry aims, scope and methodology. It also discusses issues faced in conducting the Confidential Inquiry, including engaging with and involving professionals, maintaining confidentiality, and the tension between wanting to base the findings on a sufficiently large number of cases so that the findings are robust and reliable but also wanting to make immediate changes to any potentially modifiable factors found to contribute to the deaths of people with learning disabilities. The step-by-step process adopted in the inquiry is illustrated in an appendix.

Digital Media

Getting better in hospital

Authors:
LEEDS ANIMATION WORKSHOP, (Producer)
Publisher:
Leeds Animation Workshop
Publication year:
2011
Pagination:
(13 mins.), DVD
Place of publication:
Leeds

Six short animated films about people with learning disabilities who need to go into hospital for different reasons. The films feature the following situations: going to A&E with a broken arm; going to the Diabetes clinic; needing an eye operation; being rushed to hospital with chest pains and having treatment for breast cancer. An easy read booklet is included in the pack.

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