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Book Full text available online for free

Delivering high quality end of life care for people who have a learning disability: resources and tips for commissioners, service providers and health and social care staff

Authors:
NHS ENGLAND, PALLIATIVE CARE FOR PEOPLE WITH LEARNING DISABILITIES
Publisher:
NHS England
Publication year:
2017
Pagination:
57
Place of publication:
Redditch

This ‘top tips’ guide aims to support commissioners, providers and clinicians to reduce inequalities in palliative and end of life for people with a learning disability, focusing on ‘The Ambitions for Palliative and End of Life Care’. These six ambitions, which provide a framework for national and local health and care system leaders to take action to improve palliative and end of life care, are: Each person is seen as an individual; Each person gets fair access to care; Maximising comfort and wellbeing; Care is coordinated; All staff are prepared to care; Each community is prepared to help. This document sets how to achieve each ambition, signposts relevant tools and resources and provides good practice examples. (Edited publisher abstract)

Book Full text available online for free

Learning disabilities: good practice project

Authors:
HOUGH Jo, MARTIN Kerry
Publisher:
Great Britain. Department of Health
Publication year:
2013
Pagination:
57
Place of publication:
London

This report gives people who commission, design and deliver services a better understanding of how to improve the lives of people with learning disabilities. It is partly based on these good practice indicators: co-production; a capabilities approach to disability; community capacity building; a move towards more integrated services; and a commitment to personalisation. It presents six examples of good practice: Public Health Norfolk & Equal Lives (formerly Norfolk Coalition of Disabled People) and its provision of easy-to-access information on local health services; the Quality Checking project in Gloucestershire; London Borough of Hackney and Advance Support and supported living for people with complex needs; MacIntyre Care in Oxfordshire, representative of transition support for young people with complex needs; the Open University’s Social History of Learning Disability Group on sharing life stories; and Merseycare NHS Rebuild Service, which offers support for people with Down’s Syndrome and early onset dementia. It gives briefer details for other shortlisted projects. The report also includes an EasyRead summary. The project was completed under an action from ‘Transforming Care: A national response to Winterbourne View Hospital’. (Original abstract)

Journal article

Police readiness for tackling hate crime against people with learning disabilities: areas for improvement and examples of good practice

Authors:
SIN Chih, SHIKH Sanah, KHANNA Mohini
Journal article citation:
Safer Communities, 11(3), 2012, pp.145-153.
Publisher:
Emerald

A number of high-profile cases of hate crime against people with learning disabilities have led to increasing concerns about the failure of police services to tackle the issues. This paper reports on research conducted for the ‘Stand By Me’ campaign which aimed to examine the extent to which police services are set up to deal with hate crime against people with learning disabilities. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with representatives from 14 police services in England. In addition, key documents submitted by the police services were reviewed and a focus group with 8 people with learning disabilities was conducted. The findings are discussed under the following themes: infrastructure and set-up; understanding; data recording; and reporting. The findings indicate that many police services are committed to tackling hate crime against people with learning disabilities. A variety of individuals have responsibility for dealing with hate crime and accountability structures are often unclear. Many services do not have hate crime policies that deal specifically with people with learning disabilities, or even disabled people in general. More training is required to ensure staff are equipped to deal with the issues. Hate crime statistics are regarded as unreliable due to significant under-reporting. However, a few services have implemented interventions to encourage reporting through awareness-raising and multi-agency working.

Journal article

The origins of “best practices” in the principle of normalization and social role valorization

Authors:
CARUSO Guy A., OSBURN Joseph A.
Journal article citation:
Journal of Policy and Practice in Intellectual Disabilities, 8(3), September 2011, pp.191-196.
Publisher:
Wiley-Blackwell

Social Role Valorisation (SRV) is acknowledged as having a major positive impact in human services. Some direct service applications, techniques, and approaches derived from SRV have been called best practices. However, many human service professionals, recipients, and others who seek out and implement these best practices do not acknowledge their relationship to SRV. This article illustrates drawbacks to pursuing these connections in isolation from SRV, including the fact that the best practice dynamic may create barriers to people practicing their efforts to address complex issues that impact people who are vulnerable. The article concludes by recommending that when authors conceptualise a best practice that is a fragment of, or actually based on SRV, then the authors should acknowledge this connection, and when practices engendered by SRV are promoted as best practices, their foundation in SRV be clearly noted.

Book Full text available online for free

Making written information easier to understand for people with learning disabilities: guidance for people who commission or produce easy read information: revised edition 2010

Author:
GREAT BRITAIN. Department of Health
Publisher:
Great Britain. Department of Health
Publication year:
2010
Pagination:
37p.
Place of publication:
London
Edition:
Rev. ed.

Good practice guidance on commissioning and preparing easy read information for people with learning disabilities. Main areas covered include: defining easy read, commissioning material, and involving people with learning disabilities. Short case study examples are included. An additional section briefly covers other formats, such as audio, video/DVD, or interactive CD-ROMs or webpages. Annexes cover: Guidelines for producing Easy Read; Supplementary guidelines for professional typesetting and printing. The document is primarily at local and national public sector organisations who produce public information specifically for people with learning disabilities.

Journal article

Solution-focused brief therapy with persons with intellectual disabilities

Authors:
ROEDEN John M., et al
Journal article citation:
Journal of Policy and Practice in Intellectual Disabilities, 6(4), December 2009, pp.253-259.
Publisher:
Wiley-Blackwell

Solution-Focused Brief Therapy (SFBT) is a short-term, goal-focused, and client-directed therapeutic approach that helps the client to generate solutions rather than dwell on problems. SFBT has rarely been used with clients with intellectual disabilities (ID). The authors discuss how this relatively new form of therapy in an adapted form can be made suitable for clients with ID. The assumptions of this therapeutic approach, the types of problems and settings addressed by SFBT and a description of the interventions used are considered. Indications and contraindications for SFBT and empirical data on the effectiveness of the therapy are discussed with regard to clients with or without ID. Tailoring SFBT to clients with ID can be done by using simple language, modified interventions and inserting other adaptations into the therapy process. Research is needed to demonstrate whether SFBT if effective with this target group can and to what extent it is valued by clients and their carers.

Journal article

Commissioning services for people with learning disabilities in Scotland: linking evidence and practice

Author:
CAMPBELL Martin
Journal article citation:
British Journal of Learning Disabilities, 37(1), March 2009, pp.28-33.
Publisher:
Wiley-Blackwell

This paper describes the development of some practical guidance for people involved in commissioning services for individuals with learning disabilities. A national conference was organised in November 2005 to look at the question of 'What works in learning disability services?', i.e. what approaches have proven effectiveness in the planning, commissioning and provision of services for people with learning disabilities. This was followed by four workshops around Scotland to seek practitioners' views on commissioning, at a strategic and at an individual level. From this, written and online guidelines were devised, based on seven steps with a number of associated key questions. These guidelines aim to inform commissioners about available research and good practice, and provide a method of recording the basis on which commissioners make their decisions for models of care and their experiences in a way that could be shared with others.

Book Full text available online for free

Good practice in learning disability nursing

Author:
GREAT BRITAIN. Department of Health
Publisher:
Great Britain. Department of Health
Publication year:
2007
Pagination:
63p., bibliog.
Place of publication:
London

This document provides good practice guidance to support learning disability nursing to make a major contribution to the health and well-being of people with a learning disability in the future.

Book

Easy guide to the Human Rights Act 1998

Authors:
HUGHES Andrea, COOMBS Phil
Publisher:
British Institute of Learning Disabilities
Publication year:
2001
Pagination:
22p.,poster.
Place of publication:
Kidderminster

Outlines the key elements of the Human Rights Act 1998 and shows how they can be applied to daily life, with specific reference to people with learning difficulties. The guide includes real life stories and examples to illustrate various abuses of human rights, as well as suggestions for good practice and contact details for further information.

Book

Supporting people with a mental handicap in ordinary housing - a good practice guide

Authors:
HEREFORD AND WORCESTER COUNTY COUNCIL. Joint Research, Information Unit
Publisher:
Hereford and Worcester Social Services Department. Joint Research and Informatio
Publication year:
1986
Pagination:
18p., bibliog.
Place of publication:
Worcester

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