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Journal article

Project SEARCH UK: evaluating its employment outcomes

Author:
KAEHNE Axel
Journal article citation:
Journal of Applied Research in Intellectual Disabilities, 29(6), 2016, pp.519-530.
Publisher:
Wiley-Blackwell

Background: The study reports the findings of an evaluation of Project SEARCH UK. The programme develops internships for young people with intellectual disabilities who are about to leave school or college. The aim of the evaluation was to investigate at what rate Project SEARCH provided employment opportunities to participants. Methods: The evaluation obtained data from all sites operational in the UK at the time of evaluation (n = 17) and analysed employment outcomes. Results: Data were available for 315 young people (n = 315) in the programme and pay and other employment related data were available for a subsample. The results of the analysis suggest that Project SEARCH achieves on average employment rates of around 50 per cent. Conclusion: Project SEARCH UK represents a valuable addition to the supported employment provision in the UK. Its unique model should inform discussions around best practice in supported employment. Implications for other supported employment programmes are discussed. (Publisher abstract)

Journal article

Examples of individual supported living for adults with intellectual disability

Authors:
COCKS Errol, et al
Journal article citation:
Journal of Intellectual Disabilities, 20(2), 2016, pp.100-108.
Publisher:
Sage
Place of publication:
London

Background: This article provides a qualitative account of four models of support for adults with intellectual disability in individual supported living (ISL) arrangements. Materials and Methods: Completion of the first 50 evaluations of 150 arrangements for the third phase of the ISL project provided the examples. Results: Four approaches are described: living alone, co-residency, relationship and host family. Within each type, wide variations occur particularly based on security of tenure, formal and informal support and management variations. Conclusion: Fifty evaluations so far illustrated a wide range of approaches to ISL, providing evidence of the critical importance of the formal and informal support environment and reinforcing the contention that ISL is appropriate for people with high support needs. (Publisher abstract)

Journal article

Employing people with disabilities: a preliminary assessment of a start-up Initiative

Authors:
YAMATANI Hide, TEIXEIRA Samantha, McDONOUGH Kathleen
Journal article citation:
Journal of Human Behavior in the Social Environment, 25(8), 2015, pp.830-842.
Publisher:
Taylor and Francis
Place of publication:
Philadelphia, USA

A major city in Pennsylvania initiated the Career Transition Liaison Project, the first of its kind in the region. Based on a mixed method evaluation design, the pilot study findings show that employing youth with disabilities requires certain accommodations and an initial investment in training, but these investments pay off for the employer. (Publisher abstract)

Journal article

Application of the Rasch rating scale model to the assessment of quality of life of persons with intellectual disability

Authors:
GOMEZ Laura E., et al
Journal article citation:
Journal of Intellectual and Developmental Disability, 37(2), June 2012, pp.141-150.
Publisher:
Informa Healthcare

Individual quality of life is a concept referring to core domains influenced by personal characteristics and environmental factors, and has received increasing attention in the field of intellectual disability. This study aimed to test and improve the psychometric properties of the INTEGRAL quality of life scale (a questionnaire to measure quality of life for adults with intellectual disability), including the observed fit of data to the Rasch model. The research involved a sample of 271 adults from provinces across Spain who had intellectual disability and used social services, and questionnaires were completed by qualified interviewers. The article describes and discusses the methodology, data analysis and results.

Journal article

Do persons with intellectual disability and limited verbal capacities respond to trauma treatment?

Authors:
MEVISSEN Lisebeth, et al
Journal article citation:
Journal of Intellectual and Developmental Disability, 36(4), December 2011, pp.278-283.
Publisher:
Informa Healthcare

People with intellectual disability have been found to be more likely to experience traumatic events and negative life events. This study aimed to examine whether eye movement desensitisation and reprocessing (an eight-phase psychotherapeutic approach) would be an applicable and effective treatment method for clients with substantial limited verbal capacities. It focused on 2 clients with moderate intellectual disabilities, serious behavioural problems, and histories of negative life events. The article provides a description of the 2 clients and a summary of the results of their treatment. In both cases, post-traumatic stress disorder-like symptoms decreased and gains were maintained at follow-up. The authors conclude the study suggests that eye movement desensitisation and reprocessing is a potentially applicable psychotherapeutic treatment method for clients with intellectual disabilities, even if they have substantially limited verbal capacities. They note that the findings highlight the need for further research.

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Supporting information for tackling indifference: healthcare services for people with learning disabilities

Author:
NHS Quality Improvement Scotland
Publisher:
NHS Quality Improvement Scotland
Publication year:
2009
Pagination:
98p.
Place of publication:
Edinburgh

NHS Quality Improvement Scotland (NHS QIS) has reviewed access to general health services for people with learning disabilities and NHS QIS have travelled around Scotland to get a full understanding of the services and arrangements in place. NHS QIS have done this in partnership with people with learning disabilities and their carers, and with health and social care professionals which has added further richness to the findings. This review was wide ranging and there were many examples of innovative and effective practice. Some of these are recorded in Section 9 of this report. There is evidence that services are improving for people with learning disabilities and their carers and the report also identified areas where further improvement can be made. Recommendations are made in full in Section 6 of the report. Findings are in three key areas: awareness and implementation of the key Acts, particularly AWIA and DDA as they both support assessing individual need and improving communication across services,  access to general health services, scheduled and out-of-hours (this also includes health promotion and improvement), and effective joined up working both across and within services which is critical to the delivery of safe, effective care. The ‘join’ between services should be invisible to individuals.

Book Full text available online for free

Tackling indifference: healthcare services for people with learning disabilities: national overview report - December 2009

Author:
NHS Quality Improvement Scotland
Publisher:
NHS Quality Improvement Scotland
Publication year:
2009
Pagination:
43p.
Place of publication:
Edinburgh

NHS Quality Improvement Scotland (NHS QIS) wrote quality indicators for services for children and adults with learning disabilities. The quality indicators are used to check how well health services are meeting people’s needs. During 2008–2009 NHS QIS looked at services for children and adults with learning disabilities in Scotland to find out what was working well and what could be better. The review teams found lots of examples of new and helpful projects. They also found that services for people with learning disabilities and their carers are improving. But there are areas that need to be better. Recommendations are listed.

Journal article

Money talks

Author:
JULIAN George
Journal article citation:
Learning Disability Today, February 2009, pp.30-31.
Publisher:
Pavilion
Place of publication:
Hove

Summarises the findings of an evaluation of the individual budget pilot programme, which involved 13 local authorities across England. The study aimed to examine whether individual budgets improved people's lives and what effect that had on the workforce. Messages from the individual budget pilots for learning disabilities services are highlighted.

Journal article Full text available online for free

Value added

Authors:
McINTOSH Barbara, SANDERSON Helen
Journal article citation:
Community Care, 20.04.06, 2006, pp.30-31.
Publisher:
Reed Business Information

This article reviews the findings of a major evaluation of person-centred planning for people with learning difficulties. The research, funded by the Department of Health, shows that person-centred planning has led to significant changes in the areas of social networks, contact with family, contact with friends, community-based activities, scheduled day activities, and levels of choice.

Journal article

Trying to get it right: undertaking research involving people with learning difficulties

Author:
RODGERS Jackie
Journal article citation:
Disability and Society, 14(4), July 1999, pp.421-433.
Publisher:
Taylor and Francis,

This article describes the authors' experience of undertaking research involving people with learning difficulties in the context of an emerging emancipatory paradigm.

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