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Journal article

Putting people first: a social constructionist approach to learning disability

Author:
CLEGG J.A.
Journal article citation:
British Journal of Clinical Psychology, 32(4), November 1993, pp.389-406.
Publisher:
Wiley-Blackwell

Moving from an individual to a social focus will allow clinical psychologists working with people who have learning disabilities to address a wider range of difficulties experienced by this client group. Social constructionist theory may be a useful framework to facilitate such an approach, and is intellectually compatible with changes occurring in other related disciplines. Research relevant to this perspective is reviewed and implications for clinical practice discussed.

Journal article

From framework to practice: person-directed planning in the real world

Authors:
MARTIN Lynn, et al
Journal article citation:
Journal of Applied Research in Intellectual Disabilities, 29(6), 2016, pp.552-565.
Publisher:
Wiley-Blackwell

Background: Person-directed planning (PDP) is an approach to planning supports that aims to redistribute power from the service system to individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities (IDD) and natural supports, improve relationships and build community. To do this, the right people with the right attitudes engaging in the right actions are needed. This paper examines how key elements in PDP contribute to successes in planning. Materials/Methods: Researchers worked with three planning teams from different community service agencies using participatory action research techniques (i.e. free list and pile sort, Socratic wheel, whys/hows exercise). Results: Most key elements of PDP were relevant to each team. Perceptions of which had most contributed to planning successes differed. Conclusions: The various elements of PDP are used by and useful to planning teams, although some may be more relevant to some successes than others because of specific goals, or the person's strengths and needs. (Edited publisher abstract)

Journal article

The power of difference in inclusive research

Author:
WOELDERS Susan
Journal article citation:
Disability and Society, 30(4), 2015, pp.528-542.
Publisher:
Taylor and Francis,

Inclusive research involves people with intellectual disabilities actively and strives for empowerment and normalisation. Less is written about the power dynamics in a research team consisting of researchers and people with intellectual disabilities and the possible value of such collaboration. In this auto-ethnography the authors reflect on these aspects and the challenges along the way. They conclude that striving for normalisation can be paralysing; ‘doing the same’ is not always possible and can be disempowering for all members of the research team. Acknowledging differences and uniqueness enriches research outcomes and makes us reflect on our own, sometimes rigid, academic frameworks. (Edited publisher abstract)

Journal article

Taking the tablets

Author:
REEVES Dot
Journal article citation:
Learning Disability Today, 15(2), March/April 2015, pp.16-17.
Publisher:
Pavilion
Place of publication:
Hove

As tablet computers grow in popularity and use, people with learning disabilities are increasingly experiencing the benefits they can bring. This article looks at how tablet computers can be used to help improve communication, increase empowerment and give people with learning disabilities a greater voice in their community. The article includes ten tips for using tablet computers with people with learning disabilities and presents a short case study on the use of tablets to help support workers and service users to learn Makaton. (Original abstract)

Journal article

Deciding what to research: an overview of a participatory workshop

Authors:
NORTHWAY Ruth, et al
Journal article citation:
British Journal of Learning Disabilities, 42(4), 2014, pp.323-327.
Publisher:
Wiley-Blackwell

This paper discusses how a participatory workshop with people with learning disabilities was held to try and identify priority areas for research. It is hoped that by sharing these experiences, other people will be encouraged to try similar approaches. (Edited publisher abstract)

Book

Disability and discourse: analysing inclusive conversation with people with intellectual disabilities

Author:
WILLIAMS Val
Publisher:
Wiley-Blackwell
Publication year:
2011
Pagination:
257p.
Place of publication:
Chichester

This book applies and explains Conversation Analysis (CA), an established methodology for studying communication, to explore what happens during the everyday encounters of people with intellectual disabilities and the other people with whom they interact. It explores conversations and encounters from the lives of people with intellectual disabilities, and introduces the established methodology of Conversation Analysis, making it accessible and useful to a wide range of students, researchers and practitioners. The book adopts a discursive approach which looks at how people with intellectual disabilities use talk in real-life situations, while showing how such talk can be supported and developed, and follows people into the meetings and discussions that take place in self-advocacy and research contexts. It then offers insights into how people with learning disabilities can have a voice in their own affairs, in policy-making, and in research.

Journal article

Inclusion and healthcare choices: the experiences of adults with learning disabilities

Authors:
FERGUSON Morag, JARRETT Dominic, TERRAS Melody
Journal article citation:
British Journal of Learning Disabilities, 39(1), March 2011, pp.73-83.
Publisher:
Wiley-Blackwell

Those with learning disabilities have fewer decision-making opportunities than the general population. This study investigated the decision-making experiences of two groups of individuals with a learning disability. Group 1 included irregular attenders who had opted out of healthcare appointments for avoidable reasons, and group 2 included regular attenders who had attended all appointments or not attended for unavoidable reasons. Interviews were carried out with 4 people with learning disabilities and/or their 13 primary carers. In addition to these interviews, physiotherapy staff participated in a focus group. Those with learning disabilities described experiences of and opportunities for making everyday decisions but mostly identified others as being responsible for making their health care choices. Overall, the paper concluded that a greater understanding of the health care expectations and experiences of individuals with learning disabilities, and those that support them, is required to enable people with learning disabilities as participants in their own health care decision-making processes.

Journal article

Lead on!

Authors:
DAVIES Jill, BURKE Christine
Journal article citation:
Learning Disability Today, 10(8), October 2010, pp.26-27.
Publisher:
Pavilion
Place of publication:
Hove

People with learning disabilities have been encouraged to take up leadership roles through the development of local partnership boards and self-advocacy groups. This article describes a programme led by the Foundation for People with Learning Disabilities to help people with learning disabilities become leaders. The Learning for Leadership programme empowers participants to develop their leadership skills and learn how they can make real change happen. The programme has been run in Wales, Cornwall and Kent. In each area local leaders with a learning disability have coordinated the workshops alongside staff from the Foundation. The programme is highly interactive and personalised with group work, role-play, DVD clips and engaging in real life situations. The outcomes from the programme have ranged from better opportunities in gaining employment, being more confident is speaking up in public, and becoming more politically aware.

Journal article

Gambling for capital: learning disability, inclusive research and collaborative life histories

Authors:
BJORNSDOTTIR Kristin, SVENSDOTTIR Aileen Soffia
Journal article citation:
British Journal of Learning Disabilities, 36(4), December 2008, pp.263-270.
Publisher:
Wiley-Blackwell

The aim of this paper is to reflect on research collaboration between a research participant with learning disability and a nondisabled doctoral student. It explores the inclusiveness of the research partnership and how collaborative life histories can be empowering both for participants and researchers. It is suggested that it is possible to make any kind of research inclusive, although doctoral projects can perhaps not be fully inclusive because of academic requirements. It is argued that people with learning disabilities should have the opportunity to be involved in research and that collaborative writing between nondisabled researchers and people with learning disabilities is no less valuable than other disability research and should be taken seriously by policy makers and academia. A second aim of the paper is to reflect on the authors positions, as a nondisabled researcher and a researcher with learning disabilities, in the field of disability studies.

Journal article

Promoting choice and control in residential services for people with learning disabilities

Authors:
FINLAY W.M.L., WALTON C., ANTAKI C.
Journal article citation:
Disability and Society, 23(4), June 2008, pp.349-360.
Publisher:
Taylor and Francis,

This paper discusses the gap between policy goals and practice in residential services for people with learning disabilities. Drawing on a nine-month ethnographic study of three residential services, it outlines a range of obstacles to the promotion of choice and control that were routinely observed in the culture and working practices of the services. Issues discussed include conflicting service values and agendas, inspection regimes, an attention to the bigger decisions in a person's life when empowerment could more quickly and effectively be promoted at the level of everyday practice, problems of communication and interpretation and the pervasiveness of teaching. The authors offer a range of suggestions as to how these obstacles might be tackled.

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