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Journal article

The content of available practice literature in dementia and intellectual disability

Author:
JOKINEN Nancy
Journal article citation:
Dementia: the International Journal of Social Research and Practice, 4(3), August 2005, pp.327-339.
Publisher:
Sage

Adults with intellectual disability are living to ages seen within the general population and they, too, are at risk of developing dementia. This review identifies the nature and content of the literature related to adults with intellectual disability and dementia and bring together guidelines for services and staff providing care. The preponderance of work between 1995 and 2004 focuses on the biomedical, diagnosis and assessment aspects of the disease. Although guidelines exist, there is a lack of published literature on the efficacy of practice strategies to guide the provision of daily care. Future research is discussed that could support continued community living and high quality of life during all stages of the disease.

Book Full text available online for free

How social care staff can support people with learning disabilities and dementia

Author:
PUBLIC HEALTH ENGLAND
Publisher:
Public Health England
Publication year:
2017
Pagination:
4
Place of publication:
London

This factsheet provides information on how social care staff can support people with learning disabilities and dementia. It covers recognising signs of dementia, sharing information about what a diagnosis of dementia means, and things social care staff can do. It is the 11th in a series of factsheets which show how social care staff can support the health needs of people with learning disabilities. The leaflet also includes a link to a supporting slide set that can be used by social care staff as a training resource. (Edited publisher abstract)

Book

Ann has dementia

Authors:
HOLLINS Sheila, BLACKMAN Noelle, ELEY Ruth
Publisher:
Beyond Words
Publication year:
2012
Pagination:
104p.
Place of publication:
London

This easy read book notes that people with intellectual disabilities, and especially those with Down’s Syndrome, tend to develop dementia ten years or so earlier than those without, plus it can be harder to diagnose. In this book “Ann” becomes forgetful and does things that start to worry her friends, like putting the milk in the washing machine and going to the shops wearing her nightdress. She visits the doctor and is diagnosed with dementia. Ann’s GP and supporter try to provide the right care for her at home in the early days of her dementia. However, Ann becomes so confused that she eventually moves into residential care. This book is suitable for either a person with an intellectual disability who has dementia themselves, or when a friend or family member does. It outlines basic details of the condition, and presents ways of dealing with these issues.

Digital Media

G.O.L.D.: growing older with learning disabilities

Authors:
JUMPCUTS, FIRST BORN CREATIVES, (Producers)
Publisher:
JUMPcuts
Publication year:
2010
Pagination:
(37 mins.), DVD
Place of publication:
Bridgwater

A DVD to help staff and carers understand the difficulties facing adults with learning disabilities in old age. It covers recognising the signs of and tracking senile dementia.

Book

Supporting people with learning disability and dementia: a training resource pack for managers, team leaders and trainers

Authors:
CHAPMAN Alan, CURTICE Lisa
Publisher:
University of Stirling. Dementia Services Development Centre; Scottish Consortium for Learning Disability
Publication year:
2008
Pagination:
205p.
Place of publication:
Stirling

This pack is intended to help managers and teams to consider wide practice issues with team member when a person with learning disability develops dementia. It is designed to be a useful focus for learning within a team and addresses key aspects of the values, knowledge, understanding and skills required of a social care worker by the Scottish Social Services Council, but also has relevance to other professional groups. Part1 describes the knowledge base, Part 2 gives a best practice case study, and part three describes seven "discussions": working with the person, communicating, seeing meaning in behaviour, responding to behaviours, pathways to support, positive risk assessment and management, and teams and multidisciplinary working.

Journal article

Transition to old age - what can we do to aid the process?

Author:
DODD Karen
Journal article citation:
Advances in Mental Health and Learning Disabilities, 2(3), September 2008, pp.7-12.
Publisher:
Emerald

This article looks at how people with learning disabilities, including people with learning disabilities who develop dementia, make the transition to old age. It identifies key issues in understanding the transition to old age for people with learning disabilities, including how the ageing process may be different for this group, lack of agreement as to what constitutes old age for people with learning disabilities, the heterogeneity that might help make the transition easier for people.

Book

Working with older people with learning disabilities: lessons from an Age Concern pilot programme

Author:
AGE CONCERN
Publisher:
Age Concern
Publication year:
2008
Pagination:
13p.
Place of publication:
London

Seeks to develop an understanding of the ageing process, to develop the knowledge and skills required to assess and define the changing needs of people with learning disabilities as they get older and to enhance the quality of life for older people with learning disabilities.

Journal article Full text available online for free

Prevalence of dementia in intellectual disability using different diagnostic criteria

Authors:
STRYDOM A., et al
Journal article citation:
British Journal of Psychiatry, 191(8), August 2007, pp.150-157.
Publisher:
Royal College of Psychiatrists

Diagnosis of dementia is complex in adults with intellectual disability owing to their pre-existing deficits and different presentation. The aim was to describe the clinical features and prevalence of dementia and its subtypes, and to compare the concurrent validity of dementia criteria in older adults with intellectual disability. The Becoming Older with Learning Disability (BOLD) memory study is a two-stage epidemiological survey of adults with intellectual disability without Down syndrome aged 60 years and older, with comprehensive assessment of people who screen positive. Dementia was diagnosed according to ICD–10, DSM–IV and DC–LD criteria. The DSM–IV dementia criteria were more inclusive. Diagnosis using ICD–10 excluded people with even moderate dementia. Clinical subtypes of dementia can be recognised in adults with intellectual disability. Alzheimer’s dementia was the most common, with a prevalence of 8.6% (95% CI 5.2–13.0), almost three times greater than expected. Dementia is common in older adults with intellectual disability, but prevalence differs according to the diagnostic criteria used. This has implications for clinical practice.

Book Full text available online for free

Responding to the pain experiences of older people with a learning disability and dementia

Authors:
KERR Diana, CUNNINGHAM Colm, WILKINSON Heather
Publisher:
Joseph Rowntree Charitable Trust
Publication year:
2006
Pagination:
81p.
Place of publication:
York

This report explores the pain management needs of people with a learning difficulty who have dementia. People with a learning difficulty are living longer. This increased longevity brings with it the conditions and illnesses of older age, such as dementia. It is known that amongst people in the general population who have dementia there is inadequate pain recognition and treatment. This report has identified similar trends in pain management amongst people with a learning difficulty and dementia. The report explores knowledge and practice in relation to pain recognition and management amongst direct support staff, members of community learning disability teams and general practitioners. It also examines the understanding and experiences of pain amongst people with a learning difficulty and dementia. It identifies the dilemmas and obstacles to effective pain management, and reports on examples of good practice. The authors make clear recommendations for practitioners and service providers. The report found that the pain experiences and management of people with a learning difficulty who have dementia mirrored findings in relation to people in the general population. It did, however, identify extra and compounding issues in relation to people with a learning difficulty. The findings in this report will be of interest to service providers and direct practitioners in health, housing, social care and social work.

Book

In the know: implementing good practice: information and tools for anyone supporting people with a learning disability and dementia

Authors:
KERR Diana, WILKINSON Heather
Publisher:
Pavilion
Publication year:
2005
Pagination:
55p.
Place of publication:
Brighton

This resource has been developed to help anyone supporting a person with learning difficulties who develops dementia. The ringbound pack contains a series of easily accessible, straightforward, practical and realistic guidance to provide good quality care. It is arranged in three sections: background, fact sheets and tools. Each of these sections is designed to be used alone or together with other parts of the pack.

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