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Book

Jacob's ladder: a parent's view of Portage

Author:
LLOYD Janette M
Publisher:
Costello
Publication year:
1986
Pagination:
191p., illus., bibliog.
Place of publication:
Tunbridge Wells
Journal article

‘It’s a matter of your personality more than anything else’: the experiences of seasonal workers regarding challenging behaviour in children

Author:
ETHERIDGE Leanne
Journal article citation:
Journal of Intellectual Disabilities, 21(1), 2017, pp.40-52.
Publisher:
Sage
Place of publication:
London

The impact on full-time carers of children with intellectual disabilities who exhibit challenging behaviour has been well researched (e.g. Lach et al., 2009; Shah et al., 2010; Wodehouse and McGill, 2009), however, there is to date no published research into the impact of behaviour that challenges on seasonal carers. Five participants who had been employed in summer playschemes for children and young people (up to the age of 18) were interviewed about their experiences of behaviour that challenges. The transcripts were analysed using interpretative phenomenological analysis, which revealed six superordinate themes: the belief in and sanctuary of temporary work, emotional impact, personality and gender, strength through knowledge, communication difficulties and the belief in integration. Seasonal workers discussed suppressing their emotions in order to stay in control of a challenging situation, using coping styles developed through experience or based on personal skills; it is suggested that formalized training, particularly regarding non-verbal communication, would support playscheme workers in the management of and adaption to challenging behaviour. (Publisher abstract)

Journal article

Reading pictures

Author:
HICKMOTT Olive
Journal article citation:
Every Child Journal, 4(3), 2014, pp.70-76.
Publisher:
Imaginative Minds
Place of publication:
Birmingham

Often missed and frequently misunderstood, dyslexia has been the ruin of many children's school ambitions. The author investigates whether mental imaging can make a difference. (Edited publisher abstract)

Book Full text available online for free

The estimated prevalence of visual impairment among people with learning disabilities in the UK

Authors:
EMERSON Eric, ROBERTSON Janet
Publisher:
Public Health England
Publication year:
2011
Pagination:
35p.
Place of publication:
London

It has been known for some time that visual impairments are more common among people with learning disabilities, especially people with more severe learning disabilities, and that the presence of visual impairments can significantly impair the independence and quality of life of people with learning disabilities. The aim of this report is to estimate how many people with learning disabilities in the UK are likely to have visual impairments. The report suggests that, at present, approximately 50,000 people with learning disabilities who are known to services in the UK have visual impairment. An additional 15,000 are blind. Whilst most children with learning disabilities are known to services, not all adults with learning disabilities are known to adult health or social care learning disabilities services – it is estimated that there may be an additional 44,000 adults with learning disabilities and visual impairment and 11,000 with learning disabilities and blindness. It is estimated that all of these figures will rise by approximately 0.5% each year over the next two decades.

Journal article

Nonverbal Learning Disability explained: the link to shunted hydrocephalus

Author:
RISSMAN Barbara
Journal article citation:
British Journal of Learning Disabilities, 39(3), September 2011, pp.209-215.
Publisher:
Wiley-Blackwell

Children with a Nonverbal Learning Disability (NLD) resulting from shunted hydrocephalus and spina bifida face many difficulties not experienced by those with a language learning disability. It is believed to be caused by damage, disorder or destruction of neuronal white matter in the brain’s right hemisphere. This article examines the relationship between shunted hydrocephalus and nonverbal learning disability. By linking the medical condition to the learning disability, the article aims to reduce misunderstanding and false accusations of laziness. The article is designed to help teachers,  psychologists, guidance officers, support workers, parents and disability service providers whose role is to understand and advocate for individuals with shunted hydrocephalus and spina bifida. Implications for future research and practice are presented.

Journal article

Promoting health-related fitness for elementary students with intellectual disabilities through a specifically designed activity program

Authors:
DAVIS Kathryn, ZHANG Guili, HODSON Patricia
Journal article citation:
Journal of Policy and Practice in Intellectual Disabilities, 8(2), June 2011, pp.77-84.
Publisher:
Wiley-Blackwell

Children with intellectual disabilities have been identified as having lower health-related fitness levels, to be more overweight, and to be less motor proficient than their peers. The aim of this study was to assess the effectiveness of the Motivate, Adapt, and Play adapted exercise programme for students with intellectual disabilities. This 8-week programme consists of 30 minutes of physical activity every school day using specialised equipment and focusing on cardiovascular endurance, flexibility, and muscular strength and endurance activities. The study participants were 25 students with mild-to-moderate intellectual disability from 4 elementary schools in the southeastern United States. The health-related fitness measures of the 16 metre shuttle run test, the modified curl-up test, and the back-saver sit-and-reach test were completed at the beginning and at the end of the 8-week period. Body mass index (BMI) measurements were also obtained. The results showed that over the 8 weeks there was a significant increase in the health-related fitness scores obtained. There was also a slight decrease in BMI over 8 weeks, although this was a nonsignificant finding. The findings suggest that the health-related fitness of students with ID can be improved through engaging in a school-based daily adapted exercise programme.

Book Full text available online for free

Personal assistance for children and adolescents (0-18) with both physical and intellectual impairments

Authors:
MAYO-WILSON Evan, MONTGOMERY Paul, DENNIS Jane
Publisher:
Campbell Collaboration
Publication year:
2008
Pagination:
30p., bibliog.
Place of publication:
Oslo

This systematic review aimed to assess the effectiveness of personal assistance for children and adolescents with both physical and intellectual impairments, and the impacts of personal assistance on others, compared to other interventions. Personal assistance is defined as paid support of at least 20 hours per week for people with impairments to enable them to participate in mainstream activities. The report focuses and the methodology used in the review;  Electronic databases were searched from 1980 to June 2005; reference lists were checked; 345 experts, organisations, government bodies and charities were contacted in an attempt to locate relevant research. The review identified no studies that met the inclusion criteria.

Journal article

Patterns of time processing ability in children with and without developmental disabilities

Authors:
JANESLATT Gunnel, et al
Journal article citation:
Journal of Applied Research in Intellectual Disabilities, 23(3), May 2010, pp.250-262.
Publisher:
Wiley-Blackwell

Children with developmental disabilities, such as intellectual disability or autism, are often reported to have problems in understanding and managing time. The aim of this study was to investigate if there are different patterns in time processing ability in children with disabilities and typically developing children. It also investigated whether the problems described are diagnosis specific or reflect differences in age. The 3 subcategories of time processing ability, time perception, time orientation, and time management, were all investigated. Using a cross-sectional design, this study investigated if there were different patterns of time processing ability in 5- to 10-year-old children, 77 of which had disabilities and 89 of which did not. Altogether, 5 different clusters of levels of time processing ability were identified. The results indicated that the patterns of time processing ability mainly follow the chronological age of children without disabilities. Daily time management (as estimated by the parents) and children's self-rated autonomy differed between clusters and was related to time processing ability. The article concludes that the level of time processing ability seems to be a more valid overall base than the type of diagnosis for the planning of interventions in daily time management.

Journal article

Eliciting proto-imperatives and proto-declaratives in children with intellectual disabilities

Authors:
VANDEREET Joke, et al
Journal article citation:
Journal of Applied Research in Intellectual Disabilities, 23(2), March 2010, pp.154-166.
Publisher:
Wiley-Blackwell

Whilst structured elicitation tasks are known to be efficient means to sample communication in children with intellectual disabilities, their validity and reliability require evaluation. The aims of this study were: to evaluate the eliciting potential; to examine the utterance forms of proto-imperative and proto-declarative intentions; and to evaluate the reliability of two high-structured elicitation tasks. Twenty-eight children with intellectual disabilities (all having severe problems acquiring symbolic language skills) participated in a standard assessment battery, consisting of a formal language assessment, a parent questionnaire, and elicitation tasks for both proto-imperatives proto-declaratives. These tasks elicited significantly more proto-imperatives than proto-declaratives, with proto-imperatives being predominantly expressed with gestures and proto-declaratives predominantly with vocalisations. Medium to large correlations were found between the elicitation tasks and the other communication and language instruments. The authors concluded that while several factors need to be considered to account for the observed differences in frequency and utterance forms of the elicited proto-imperatives versus proto-declaratives, nevertheless, the overall results suggest that the elicitation tasks for proto-imperatives and proto-declaratives can be reliably used in children with intellectual disabilities.

Book Full text available online for free

Effective support for parents with a learning disability and their children: seminar held at National Children's Bureau, 7 December 2007

Author:
NATIONAL CHILDREN'S BUREAU
Publisher:
National Children's Bureau
Publication year:
2008
Pagination:
19p.
Place of publication:
London

NCB Social Inclusion Department seminar notes More and more people with a learning disability are choosing to become parents yet between 40-60% of them will at some stage have their children taken away from them.

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