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Journal article

Restrictive behaviour management procedures with people with intellectual disabilities who require dental treatment

Author:
NEWTON J.T.
Journal article citation:
Journal of Applied Research in Intellectual Disabilities, 22(2), March 2009, pp.118-125.
Publisher:
Wiley-Blackwell

Dental disease is more common among people with intellectual disabilities than in the general population. Improvements in oral health require individuals to engage in daily oral hygiene and regular visits to a dental practitioner; both may be challenging for the individual with intellectual impairment. A review of policies relating to behaviour management and physical restraint for individuals with intellectual disabilities and challenging behaviours was undertaken. Published studies of behaviour management in individuals with intellectual disabilities attending for dental treatment were reviewed. Reference to studies of children with average IQ and other populations were made where appropriate. There is little published evidence regarding behaviour management for people with intellectual disabilities who require dental treatment. Current policies place great emphasis on pharmacological management and restrictive behaviour management techniques. There is a paucity of studies which have employed a functional analysis framework. There are few incentives for dentists to implement positive approaches to behaviour management as current systems of payment reward the completion of numbers of treatments and thus there is an incentive to complete treatments quickly rather than to spend time with patients.

Journal article

Mountaineering expedition by persons with intellectual disability: impact on behavior and temperament

Authors:
KISHORE Thomas M., NAGAR Ram K.
Journal article citation:
Journal of Intellectual Disabilities, 12(3), September 2008, pp.183-189.
Publisher:
Sage
Place of publication:
London

The recreational needs of adults with intellectual disability are the same as those of the general population. If properly planned, recreational activities can facilitate positive behavioural changes. In this context, this present study was designed to understand the effects of a mountaineering expedition on the behaviours and temperament in a group of people with intellectual disability. This study included eight men and two women with intellectual disability aged 17-38 years from India. After a training programme, the participants went on an 11 day expedition in the Himalayan region under the supervision of professionals and two parents. Results indicated that all of them successfully climbed mountains up to 12,000 feet, and also had specific positive behavioural changes. Details and implications are discussed in this article.

Journal article

Use of the Interact Short Form as a tool to evaluate emotion of people with profound intellectual disabilities

Authors:
LIU K. P. Y., et al
Journal article citation:
Journal of Intellectual Disability Research, 51(11), November 2007, pp.884-891.
Publisher:
Wiley

One of the essential purposes of intervention programmes for people with profound intellectual disabilities (ID) is to enhance the desirable mood and behaviour and decrease the undesirable ones through stabilizing their emotion.  This study aimed to examine the validity and reliability of the Interact Short Form for evaluating the mood and behaviour of people with profound ID, and at the same time, review their emotional profile using the Interact Short Form. Both content validity using expert panel review and construct validity by means of factor analysis were investigated. A total of 75 people with profound ID were recruited. Inter-rater reliability was tested. The results of the Interact Short Form were described to reflect the emotional profile of this group of participants. Using the results of expert panel review and those from factor analysis, we found three subscales representing the mood and behaviour of people with profound ID. They were: ‘emotional expression’, ‘interests towards tasks’ and ‘behaviours to environment’. All three subscales were found to be internally consistent. The Interact Short Form – People with profound ID version also showed good inter-rater reliability. The results of the Interact Short Form showed that this group of participants had fairly stable emotion under the structured setting and activities in the residential institutions where data were collected. It is concluded that the Interact Short Form – People with profound ID version serves as a helpful tool for both clinical and research use in assessing the mood and behaviour of people with profound ID in a simple, comprehensive and systematic way.

Journal article Full text available online for free

Out of order

Authors:
RAMCHARAN Paul, McCLIMENS Alex, ROBERTS Bronwen
Journal article citation:
Community Care, 22.06.06, 2006, pp.34-35.
Publisher:
Reed Business Information

Community care, as it affects individuals labelled with learning difficulties, offers a chance of inclusion within mainstream society. More recently, the government's policy on antisocial behaviour orders threatens to encroach on ideas of tolerance, acceptance and diversity. The authors discuss the potential effects on people with learning difficulties.

Book

Intellectual disabilities: genetics, behaviour and inclusion

Author:
RONDAL J. A.
Publisher:
Whurr
Publication year:
2004
Pagination:
203p.
Place of publication:
London

Advances in biobehavioural sciences are bringing important changes in the field of intellectual disabilities. Of particular interest is the description of particular behavioural phenotypes related to but distinct from genotypes, and the extent to which they are specific. In this text, more than 20 particular genetic syndromes with marked levels of intellectual disability are identified and described from a variety of points of view, including cognitive, language, behavioural, adaptive and social and community inclusion aspects.

Journal article

Applied behaviour analysis and intellectual disability: a long-term relationship

Author:
REMINGTON Bob
Journal article citation:
Journal of Intellectual and Developmental Disability, 23(2), June 1998, pp.121-135.
Publisher:
Informa Healthcare

Describes the history of the alliance between caregivers and educators of people with intellectual disability on the one hand, and researchers and interventionists with a behaviour analytic orientation on the other. The review considers both the strengths and weaknesses of applied behaviour analysis in this context, highlighting areas where further growth and development can still be expected. Particular emphasis is placed on the fact that behaviour analysis can continue to provide valuable insights into the education and treatment of people with intellectual disability by drawing on a unique conceptual stance and ever-expanding collection of relevant experimental research.

Journal article

Pain signals

Author:
DONOVAN Jim
Journal article citation:
Nursing Times, 5.11.97, 1997, pp.60-62.
Publisher:
Nursing Times

Explains the range of ways people with learning disabilities have to show that they are in pain.

Journal article

Relationships must have structures

Author:
BAYLEY Michael
Journal article citation:
Community Living, 9(2), October 1995, p.13.
Publisher:
Hexagon Publishing

Sets out the hypothesis used by the author for his four year research project (funded by the Joseph Rowntree Foundation) into the needs of people with learning difficulties. The author concludes that a crucial requirement, is that the relationships required to meet human needs have to be considered within the structures or settings needed to sustain them.

Journal article

An observational case study of staring behaviour

Author:
FALLON John
Journal article citation:
British Journal of Learning Disabilities, 23(1), 1995, pp.33-36.
Publisher:
Wiley-Blackwell

Describes the use of empirical data to test a popularity-held subjective view of the attitude of a man with learning disabilities towards children following incidents involving attacks on children after his settlement into the community from long-term institutional care. Analysis of the data collected revealed no significant difference between attention paid to adults and children. It was therefore concluded that it was unreasonable to assume an unhealthy preoccupation with children.

Journal article

Aggressive behaviour and its prevalence within five typologies

Authors:
CROTTY Gerard, DOODY Owen, LYONS Rosemary
Journal article citation:
Journal of Intellectual Disabilities, 18(1), 2014, pp.76-89.
Publisher:
Sage
Place of publication:
London

Crucial to understanding an individual, presenting with intellectual disability and the management of their challenging behaviours, is the knowledge of the types of those specific behaviours. The term aggressive behaviour is a universal term that embraces many aspects of behaviour that vary in terms of severity, frequency and seriousness for the individual and those around them. Hence, greater consideration regarding intervention, management, person-centred strategies and prevalence and frequency rates are required in service provision for individuals with intellectual disability and aggressive behaviour. This review presents the context of aggressive behaviour and its prevalence within the five typologies of aggressive behaviour: verbal aggression, aggression against others, sexually inappropriate behaviour, self-injurious behaviour and aggression against property, as identified by Crocker et al. (2007). The focus of this review is to report on the prevalence of aggressive behaviour reported for individuals with intellectual disability and consider the ambiguity in defining aggressive behaviour. (Publisher abstract)

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