Filter results

Register/log in to your SCIE account to use the search filters below

Search results for ‘Subject term:"learning disabilities"’ Sort:  

Results 1 - 10 of 383

Journal article

Working reflexively in learning disabilities: what Emma taught us

Authors:
MANNERS Paula Jean, RUSS Marina, CARRUTHERS Emma
Journal article citation:
British Journal of Learning Disabilities, 34(4), December 2006, pp.211-214.
Publisher:
Wiley-Blackwell

This article is about the feelings of powerlessness that professionals feel to cure learning disability and to answer questions such as 'why do I have a learning disability?'.  The authors describe how on person with learning disabilities showed them, through role play, what it was like to have learning disabilities.

Journal article Full text available online for free

Qualities in friendship: within an outside perspective: definitions expressed by adolescents with mild intellectual disabilities

Author:
SIGSTAD Hanne Marie Hoybraten
Journal article citation:
Journal of Intellectual Disabilities, 21(1), 2017, pp.20-39.
Publisher:
Sage
Place of publication:
London

Background: This study examined how adolescents with mild intellectual disabilities define qualities of friendship and discussed the extent to which these definitions adhere to established definitions of close friendship. Materials and Methods: The study was based on qualitative interviews with 11 adolescents in secondary school. The interviews were supplemented with information from six parents. A thematic structural analysis was used to identify themes. Results: Qualities of friendship were categorised as mutual preference, mutual enjoyment, shared interactions, care, mutual trust and bonding. The criteria for close friendship seem to be fulfilled, albeit to a moderate degree. Closeness and reciprocity appear to be significant in this study, although these features have been considered less relevant within this target group in previous research. Conclusions: Differences in definitions may explain divergent results compared with other studies, and the need to achieve equivalence in friendship may be another. (Edited publisher abstract)

Journal article

‘Being friends means helping each other, making coffee for each other’: reciprocity in the friendships of people with intellectual disability

Author:
CALLUS Anne-Marie
Journal article citation:
Disability and Society, 32(1), 2017, pp.1-16.
Publisher:
Taylor and Francis,

Friendship is an issue of concern for many people with intellectual disability. The aim of the research presented in this paper is to understand how people with intellectual disability experience friendship and what friendship means for them. A focus group was held with seven people with intellectual disability, who are members of a self-advocacy group. An inductive thematic analysis approach was used to analyse the data. The people that the research participants identified as their friends were fellow self-advocates, family members, support workers and co-workers. They also identified behaviours and actions that foster friendship and those that undermine it. The analysis shows how the research participants identified as friendships those relationships which had an element of reciprocity, while linking a lack of reciprocity with the absence of friendship. It is very important for non-disabled people to understand the perspectives of people with intellectual disability they live and work with. (Edited publisher abstract)

Journal article

The identities and social roles of people with an intellectual disability: challenging dominant cultural worldviews, values and mythologies

Authors:
DOROZENKO Kate P., ROBERTS Lynne D., BISHOP Brian J.
Journal article citation:
Disability and Society, 30(9), 2015, pp.1345-1364.
Publisher:
Taylor and Francis,

Intellectual disability is commonly conceptualised as stigmatised identity with which one has to live. However, within the literature the notion of a damaged identity is contested. The aim of this research was to explore the social construction of intellectual disability, with an emphasis on the identities and social roles of people with an intellectual disability. Informed by a contextualist perspective, this research was conducted within a participatory framework. The co-researchers involved in this research were 18 members of an advocacy agency. Photovoice and conversational interviewing were used to collect data and causal layered analysis was used to deconstruct the data. Analysis of the interactions that emerged across the causal layers revealed a complex dynamic of worldviews which served to construct people with an intellectual disability as incompetent, inherently different and not quite human. For genuine, transformative change to occur, developing an awareness and understanding of social processes, such as dehumanisation, is crucial. (Publisher abstract)

Journal article

Students’ attitudes towards individuals with an intellectual disability

Authors:
PATEL Meera, ROSE John
Journal article citation:
Journal of Intellectual Disabilities, 18(1), 2014, pp.90-103.
Publisher:
Sage
Place of publication:
London

The aim of the study was to investigate attitudes held by a British student population towards individuals with an intellectual disability. Students participated in focus groups addressing their attitudes, behaviours and perceptions of individuals with an intellectual disability. Thematic analysis was the method used to identify emergent themes. Results identified five main themes in relation to intellectual disabilities. The themes suggest that attitude scales fail to effectively measure the multidimensional nature of British student’s attitudes towards intellectual disabilities. One out of the five emergent attitude themes from the current study is sufficiently represented in measures of attitudes towards intellectual disability. These results suggest a need to modify current attitude scales or develop new ones to measure the British population’s attitudes towards intellectual disabilities. A lack of knowledge about intellectual disabilities was also identified. Participants recognized exposure through the media as a tool to increase knowledge. (Publisher abstract)

Journal article

Staff characteristics and attitudes towards the sexuality of people with intellectual disability

Authors:
MEANEY-TAVARES Rebecca, GAVIDIA-PAYNE Susana
Journal article citation:
Journal of Intellectual and Developmental Disability, 37(3), September 2012, pp.269-273.
Publisher:
Informa Healthcare

People with learning disabilities often experience difficulties in correctly interpreting behavioural cues which may have detrimental outcomes with respect to their expression of sexuality. The identification of individual staff characteristics that have a relationship with specific attitudes of staff caring for people with learning disabilities may enable targeted training and better support. In this study, 66 participants from services for people with learning disabilities in metropolitan Melbourne, Australia, completed a survey, including the Attitudes to Sexuality Questionnaire. Findings revealed that staff attitudes towards the sexuality of people with learning disabilities were quite positive. Age, programme agency position, and training uptake were all associated with positive staff attitudes. The authors concluded that targeted training programmes in sexuality can benefit direct care workers in general and older staff more specifically. Implications for training and practice are discussed.

Journal article

Commentary on “Human rights training: impact on attitudes and knowledge”

Author:
KIDD Jo
Journal article citation:
Tizard Learning Disability Review, 17(2), 2012, pp.88-91.
Publisher:
Emerald

This paper seeks to provide a commentary on the previous paper by Michelle Redman et al in this journal issue. Redman investigated the impact of a particular approach to human rights training on the knowledge and attitudes of a group of support staff in the health service. The results suggested that this training had a significant effect on knowledge about human rights but very little effect on attitudes towards human rights. This commentary poses the question as to whether human rights training can have an effect on attitudes towards human rights and, if so, which approach is the most effective. It outlines the distinction between 2 different types of approach to human rights training: one that assumes that the concept of human rights already runs through the work of public service providers; and the other that suggests that human rights training should challenge pre-existing beliefs and assumptions. The commentary suggests that the second of these approaches, the ‘activist’ approach, would go further towards winning hearts and minds. Suggestions on the kind of training needed to change people’s attitudes are provided, and underline the importance of the need for people with learning disabilities to have the space to tell their own stories.

Journal article

Women and men with intellectual disabilities who sell or trade sex: voices from the professionals

Authors:
KUOSMANEN Jari, STARKE Mikaela
Journal article citation:
Journal of Social Work in Disability and Rehabilitation, 10(3), July 2011, pp.129-149.
Publisher:
Taylor and Francis
Place of publication:
Philadelphia, USA

In this study undertaken in Sweden, the authors explored the knowledge and perceptions of professionals working in the field about people with intellectual disabilities who sell or exchange sexual services. The article introduces the study and includes a brief overview of the background to disability and prostitution in Swedish legislation. 19 professionals from various types of agencies and specialisations (including social workers, psychologists, special education teachers, support volunteers, and care workers) were recruited to participate in 6 focus groups. The discussions were transcribed and analysed, and the article presents and discusses the results, with examples from the focus groups. Different motives and contributing factors were identified for the behaviour, and 2 distinct discourses emerged: people with intellectual disabilities who traded sexual favours were presented as either conscious and autonomous agents or unaware and exploited victims.

Journal article

Staff beliefs about why people with learning disabilities self-harm: a Q-methodology study

Authors:
DICK Katie, et al
Journal article citation:
British Journal of Learning Disabilities, 39(3), September 2011, pp.233-242.
Publisher:
Wiley-Blackwell

Staff beliefs about why people with learning disabilities self-harm are important because they can affect the way that staff respond to the behaviour. Existing research into staff beliefs about self-harm by people with learning disabilities is limited and restricted to forensic services. This study used Q-methodology to explore staff beliefs about why people with learning disabilities self-harm. Participants included 33 staff from community teams and day services for people with learning disabilities. Five viewpoints were identified: self-harm is individual, complex and emotionally meaningful; self-harm is a means to communicate distress; self-harm is difficult to understand but seems to be a way to modify emotional states; self-harm is a result of having learning disabilities and being different; and self-harm is meaningful within relationships. These viewpoints represent the variety of theories and discussions in the literature. It is proposed that some of these viewpoints may result in more helpful responses to self-harm than others. The authors concluded that it would be useful for staff to receive more training about self-harm. This could improve care for people with learning disabilities who self-harm.

Journal article

Assessment – what is important to this person?

Author:
WILLIAMS Paul
Journal article citation:
Community Living, 23(3), Spring 2010, pp.19-20.
Publisher:
Hexagon Publishing

Assessment is the systematic collection, recording and interpretation of information for a particular purpose. In the past, it has been usual for some very negative information to be collected about people with learning disabilities, sometimes as a supposed way of identifying needs, but sometimes as a trigger for control, subversion and oppression. This short article urges students to develop positive values towards people with learning disabilities and an orientation towards positive information about them. These principles, the author suggests, can, and should be, reflected in assessment.

Key to icons

  • Free resource Free resource
  • Journal article Journal article
  • Book Book
  • Digital media Digital media
  • Journal Journal

Give us your feedback

Social Care Online continues to be developed in response to user feedback.

Contact us with your comments and for any problems using the website.

Sign up/login for more

Register/login to use standard search filters, access resource links, advanced search and email alerts