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Digital Media

G.O.L.D.: growing older with learning disabilities

Authors:
JUMPCUTS, FIRST BORN CREATIVES, (Producers)
Publisher:
JUMPcuts
Publication year:
2010
Pagination:
(37 mins.), DVD
Place of publication:
Bridgwater

A DVD to help staff and carers understand the difficulties facing adults with learning disabilities in old age. It covers recognising the signs of and tracking senile dementia.

Journal article

The prevalence and soverity of physical mobility limitations in older adults with intellectual disabilities

Authors:
CLEVER Shaun, OUELLETTE-KUNTZ Helene, HUNTER Duncan
Journal article citation:
Journal of Applied Research in Intellectual Disabilities, 22(5), September 2009, pp.477-486.
Publisher:
Wiley-Blackwell

A proxy-response telephone survey was conducted to establish the prevalence and severity of mobility limitations among adults with intellectual disabilities, aged 45 years and over, using validated instruments to quantify mobility in a representative population-based sample. Surveys were completed for 128 people in Ontario, Canada. Mobility limitations were common, but the prevalence varied depending on the definition of mobility limitation. The prevalence of limitations was greater among females than males, but no clear age trend was seen.

Journal article

Transition to old age - what can we do to aid the process?

Author:
DODD Karen
Journal article citation:
Advances in Mental Health and Learning Disabilities, 2(3), September 2008, pp.7-12.
Publisher:
Emerald

This article looks at how people with learning disabilities, including people with learning disabilities who develop dementia, make the transition to old age. It identifies key issues in understanding the transition to old age for people with learning disabilities, including how the ageing process may be different for this group, lack of agreement as to what constitutes old age for people with learning disabilities, the heterogeneity that might help make the transition easier for people.

Journal article

Staff-averse challenging behaviour in older adults with intellectual disabilities

Authors:
HARTLEY Sigan L., MacLEAN William E.
Journal article citation:
Journal of Applied Research in Intellectual Disabilities, 20(6), November 2007, pp.519-528.
Publisher:
Wiley-Blackwell

People with intellectual disabilities are increasingly reaching older adulthood. Little is known about age-related change in the prevalence of challenging behaviours among older adults with intellectual disabilities. The frequency and severity of staff-averse challenging behaviours of 132 older adults with intellectual disabilities was assessed through informant ratings on the Inventory of Client and Agency Planning at two time points 8–10 years apart. There was an intraindividual decline in the frequency and severity of challenging behaviour using both lenient and more restricted definitions of challenging behaviour. There was a low prevalence but high comorbidity of severe challenging behaviour. Level of mental retardation and adaptive behaviour were related to the frequency and severity of challenging behaviour. An understanding of age-related intraindividual change in challenging behaviour has implications for staff wellbeing and optimizing the care of older adults with intellectual disabilities.

Journal article

Ageing and intellectual disability in Israel: a study to compare community residence with living at home

Authors:
LIFSHITZ Hefziba, MERRICK Joav
Journal article citation:
Health and Social Care in the Community, 11(4), July 2003, pp.364-371.
Publisher:
Wiley-Blackwell

Compares ageing phenomena in 29 people aged over 40 with intellectual disabilities living in community residences with 31 living with their families to compare health status between the 2 types of settings and between the study sample and the general Israeli population of the same age group, and investigate whether deterioration occurs among the participants in activities of daily living (ADLs), cognitive ability and leisure activity. Health problems had already appeared by 40 among the participants. The most frequent were visual impairment (33%), hearing impairments (20%), heart problems (20%) and dental problems (30%). The community-based group displayed more medical problems than people living at home, whereas individuals living at home had more dental problems. Participants' functioning in ADL areas was high, with no evident decline reported during the previous 5 years. Concerning leisure time, a decline in functioning in both residential groups was observed, and, interestingly, scores for social life and leisure activities were better for the community-based group. There is a need for better dental service provision for people with intellectual disabilities living at home. The data provided can serve as a preliminary base for the development of geriatric services for older adults with intellectual disabilities in the community and also for further comparison with peers in the general population.

Journal article

Shifting responsibilities: the patterns of formal service use by older people with intellectual disability in Victoria

Author:
BIGBY Christine
Journal article citation:
Journal of Intellectual and Developmental Disability, 23(3), September 1998, pp.229-243.
Publisher:
Informa Healthcare

As adults with intellectual disability age and inevitably lose support provided by parents, many will become more reliant on formal services. Potentially they can utilise both the aged care and the disability service systems, although neither have explicit policies in relation to this group. This qualitative study in Australia examined the patterns of service use by older people with intellectual disability.

Book

The ageing process: guidelines for recognition in people with learning disabilities

Authors:
TWEEDY Peter, PEEL Shelagh, FENTON Roger
Publisher:
North West Training and Development Team
Publication year:
1995
Pagination:
13p.
Place of publication:
Clitheroe

Practical guidelines for carers of people with learning difficulties on the different aspects of ageing.

Journal article

Growing older gracefully

Author:
ATKINSON D.
Journal article citation:
Community Care, 9.6.88, 1988, pp.30-31.
Publisher:
Reed Business Information

Some of the 'first generation' of group home dwellers are now ageing. The elderly mentally handicapped raise new issues for staff working with them.

Book Full text available online for free

Talking together: facilitating peer support activities to help people with learning disabilities understand about growing older and living with dementia

Authors:
TOWERS Christine, GLOVER Cindy
Publisher:
Foundation for People with Learning Disabilities
Publication year:
2015
Pagination:
56
Place of publication:
London

This handbook describes how to run facilitated peer support groups where people use their understanding and experiences to help each other, aiming to help people with learning disabilities experience a greater sense of well-being as they grow older. It covers starting a group; planning, starting and ending each session; and provides ideas to help people feel engaged. The handbook also outlines 20 participative activities to engage people to think and talk about the changes that may occur as they get older. The activities have been tested in group sessions in two locations: a shared house for six people with learning disabilities where one of the housemates had developed dementia and a small day centre for older people with learning disabilities where one person had dementia. (Edited publisher abstract)

Journal article

Impediments to community-based care for people ageing with intellectual disability in rural New South Wales

Authors:
WARK Stuart, HUSSAIN Rafat, EDWARDS Helen
Journal article citation:
Health and Social Care in the Community, 22(6), 2014, pp.623-633.
Publisher:
Wiley-Blackwell

The emerging phenomenon of ageing with an intellectual disability has become subject to an increasing research focus in recent years. However, there remains little knowledge regarding the specific impediments that community workers face in supporting this cohort. The aims of the current study were to identify the major factors that, direct care staff believe, have most impact upon individuals ageing with an intellectual disability in the community. A three-round Delphi project was conducted across rural areas of New South Wales in Australia with 31 disability support workers to gain their perspectives on the main impediments facing a person ageing with intellectual disability. The 2010 study identified that the issue of ageing with an intellectual disability was presenting significant problems for community-based service delivery to this group of people. The panel identified 25 different impediments to the provision of support. A thematic analysis of the items indicated three main themes of ‘funding’, ‘training’ and ‘access to services’. By identifying these impediments to supporting people ageing with an intellectual disability in the community, both services and government funding bodies have the ability to plan to overcome both current and future problem areas. This identification of impediments may facilitate individuals to receive more appropriate assistance, which in turn may lead to an improved quality of life and maintenance of a community-based placement rather than premature admission to the congregate-care system. This study is particularly timely, given that Australia is in the midst of implementing a National Disability Insurance Scheme, and is an opportunity for all levels of government to agree on the mechanisms to appropriately assist individuals with an intellectual disability to continue to be supported in the community as they age. (Publisher abstract)

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