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Journal article

Brick by brick: building up our knowledge base on the abuse of adults with learning disabilities

Author:
McCARTHY Michelle
Journal article citation:
Tizard Learning Disability Review, 19(3), 2014, pp.130-133.
Publisher:
Emerald

Purpose: This commentary encourages readers to take a broad view of abuse of people with learning disabilities and to use all the knowledge available to support individuals, whilst at the same time demanding social changes. Design/methodology/approach: Whilst acknowledging the continued importance of research studies specifically focused on the topic of abuse, this commentary reviews information about abuse of adults with learning disabilities from other sources, e.g., through service audits, studies on sexual and personal relationships. Findings: Having many sources of information about abuse against people with learning disabilities is a good thing, but there are some problems associated with this. First, some forms of abuse appear to be easier to find out about than others, and second, the difficult question of how the information can be used to improve the lives of people with learning disabilities. (Edited publisher abstract)

Journal article

Personal experience and perception of abuse in people with intellectual disabilities

Authors:
LEUTAR Zdravka, VITLOV Josipa, LEUTAR Ivan
Journal article citation:
Journal of Intellectual Disabilities, 18(3), 2014, pp.249-269.
Publisher:
Sage
Place of publication:
London

This article presents a qualitative study designed to gain insight into personal experience and perception of abuse in people with intellectual disabilities. Ten members of the organization for people with intellectual disabilities in Zadar, Croatia, who have a diagnosis of light or moderate intellectual disability, were included in the research. Analysis of responses showed that most participants had experienced psychological, physical and financial abuse. The most frequent perpetrators of abuse were identified by participants as friends, acquaintances and volunteer carers. Typical sites for the experience of abuse were school, social clubs/support institutions, the street and the urban environment. Most participants seek assistance and support in cases of abuse through discussion with their loved ones, mostly their parents and friends. In addition to such informal relationships, some participants mentioned the importance of formal forms of support. (Publisher abstract)

Journal article

How do we prevent another Winterbourne? A literature review

Author:
WRIGHT Sally
Journal article citation:
Advances in Mental Health and Intellectual Disabilities, 7(6), 2013, pp.3-14.
Publisher:
Emerald

Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to focus on the precipitants of physical and psychological abuse of individuals with intellectual disabilities in order to understand why mistreatment continues to be prevalent. In particular, the importance of contributing factors were explored such as challenging behaviour and lack of staff training, in an attempt to prevent another “Winterbourne”. Design/methodology/approach – A literature search using the search terms “Intellectual disability”, “learning disability”, “abuse”, “challenging behaviour” and “residential” was conducted. Articles were included using the criteria: adults with intellectual disabilities, concentration on neglect and physical abuse, abuse by staff members and articles written within the last 15 years. Using these criteria, a total of 19 articles were isolated. Additional articles were located through reference to citation lists. In total, 31 relevant articles were identified. Findings – The majority of research agrees that a meaningful increase in risk of abuse does exist for individuals with intellectual disabilities. There is a lack of recent empirical evidence discussing the incidence of abuse, potential causes and the long-term impact of staff training in reducing the incidence of abuse. These gaps may be due to the subjective definition of abuse, the current “reactive” approach to abuse, the ability of perpetrators to hide mistreatment and difficulty in quantifying the difference that increased staff training has on performance. More research is required to adequately protect individuals with intellectual disabilities in the residential setting. Originality/value – The paper highlights gaps in the current literature and identifies potential areas that could be improved in order to reduce the prevalence of abuse in residential care. (Edited publisher abstract)

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Looking into abuse: research by people with learning disabilities

Author:
LOOKING INTO ABUSE RESEARCH TEAM
Publisher:
University of Glamorgan
Publication year:
2013
Pagination:
118

A participatory research project which aimed to develop better ways for people with learning disabilities to find support after being abused and to prevent abuse. The research questions asked were: What do people with learning disabilties understand by abuse?; what are their views about abuse?; What help and support do they need to keep safe?; and what is the best way to help someone who has been abused? The study also wanted to learn more about how participatory research could work effectively. For the first part of the study, data were gathered from people with learning disabilities in Wales by means of individual interviews (n= 14), focus groups (47 people in 7 groups) and questionnaires (n=107). Data indicated that participants were aware of a range of different types of abuse and aware of the negative effects it can have on people but whilst they can identify strategies that could help to keep people safe and support them if they are abused, there seems to be a lack of education regarding personal safety issues. In addition they do not always feel that they are listened to and/ or believed. The study also identified important issues to consider when undertaking participatory research. These included: building and maintaining relationships, issues relating to how people are employed, practical issues such as money and accessibility and time. (Original abstract)

Journal article

Looking into abuse: research by people with learning disabilities

Author:
HOWARTH Joyce
Journal article citation:
Llais, 103, Summer 2012, pp.12-15.
Publisher:
Learning Disability Wales

People with learning disabilities are acknowledged as one of the most vulnerable groups in society. Studies give estimates of the numbers who have been victims of abuse ranging from 30 – 50%. Identification of abuse is recognised as problematic, so the issue could be even greater than these figures suggest. It is usually staff who are asked to report abuse, with little involvement of the people who have been affected. This article describes a unique project that involved people with a learning disability as researchers into abuse, rather than just being passive subjects of research. Ten years ago the Unit for Development in Intellectual Disabilities (UDID) at the University of Glamorgan brought together an advisory group of people with learning disabilities. Named TRAC, the Teaching and Research Advisory Committee meets monthly and advises on teaching and research initiatives from their position as experts in living with learning disabilities. The author describes the work that has been done.

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Review of compliance: Castlebeck Care (Teesdale) Ltd.: Winterbourne View

Author:
CARE QUALITY COMMISSION
Publisher:
Care Quality Commission
Publication year:
2011
Pagination:
45p.
Place of publication:
London

Winterbourne View is a 24-bed purpose designed Assessment and Treatment Unit providing healthcare and support for adults with learning disabilities, complex needs and challenging behaviour. It is operated by  Castlebeck Care (Teesdale) Ltd. This review was carried out following the BBC television programme Panorama which showed the serious abuse of patients at Winterbourne View over several months. The review found that Winterbourne View was not meeting 10 essential standards. Concerns resulted in the Care Quality Commission taking enforcement action to remove Winterbourne View from the registration of Castlebeck Care (Teesdale) Ltd.

Journal article

Friend or fake?

Author:
GRUNDY David
Journal article citation:
Learning Disability Today, June 2011, pp.14-15.
Publisher:
Pavilion
Place of publication:
Hove

Mate crime, where someone befriends a person with learning disabilities to gain access to their money, is a growing problem. The Safety Net project, which aims to raise awareness of the issue is running pilots in Devon and Calderdale. The work undertaken so far, which includes training sessions and the production of resources are described.

Journal article

Staying on TRAC

Authors:
JONES Victoria, et al
Journal article citation:
Learning Disability Today, April 2010, pp.34-36.
Publisher:
Pavilion
Place of publication:
Hove

People with learning disabilities are acknowledged as a particularly vulnerable group, with estimates of the number who have been victims of abuse ranging from 30-50%. However, research has often failed to ask people with learning disabilities what they think and feel about abuse. Participatory research aims to give power back to disabled people and bring about change both in research and wider society. It involves people with learning disabilities working as co-researchers and being actively involved in all stages of the research process. This article describes a planned 3-year study by the Teaching and Research Advisory Committee (TRAC) at the University of Glamorgan with their partners Rhondda Cynon Taff People First and New Pathways. The planned study will explore what people with learning disabilities understand by abuse, what help and support they need to keep themselves safe from abuse and, if someone has been abused, what are the best ways to provide support. The project will actively involve people with learning disabilities at all stages of the research process, with 3 people with learning disabilities employed as co-researchers. The information gathered from the study will be used to directly inform the development of counselling provision for people with learning disabilities.

Journal article

A lifeline for vulnerable people is under threat

Author:
CUREN Richard.
Journal article citation:
Community Living, 22(2), 2008, pp.18-19.
Publisher:
Hexagon Publishing

The Respond's Helpline, which aims to help people with learning disabilities who have experienced abuse and/or trauma, currently needs funding to secure its future. This article discusses the history of the service and why it is needed. Two users of the helpline also describe how it was able to help them.

Digital Media

Abuse: tell someone

Authors:
COLLIS Anne, (Producer)
Publisher:
Learning Disability Wales
Publication year:
2008
Pagination:
DVD
Place of publication:
Cardiff

This interactive DVD has been developed to inform people with learning disabilities across Wales about protecting themselves from harm and abuse. Contents includes information on rights and keeping safe from harm, information outlining what abuse is, and what to do if abuse happens to you or someone you know. The DVD includes a short documentary about abuse, five interactive dramas, a quiz game and an easy to read leaflet. Funded by the Welsh Assembly Government, the DVD is the result of a joint project between All Wales People First, Learning Disability Wales, Mencap Cymru and Caerphilly Social Services.

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