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Book Full text available online for free

Healthy eyes, teeth and ears

Author:
PUBLIC HEALTH ENGLAND
Publisher:
Public Health England
Publication year:
2017
Pagination:
3
Place of publication:
London

This factsheet provides information on how social care staff can support people with learning disabilities to look after their eyes, teeth and ears. It is the fifth in a series of factsheets which show how social care staff can support the health needs of people with learning disabilities. The leaflet also includes a link to a supporting slide set that can be used by social care staff as a training resource. (Edited publisher abstract)

Book Full text available online for free

How social care staff can support people with learning disabilities and dementia

Author:
PUBLIC HEALTH ENGLAND
Publisher:
Public Health England
Publication year:
2017
Pagination:
4
Place of publication:
London

This factsheet provides information on how social care staff can support people with learning disabilities and dementia. It covers recognising signs of dementia, sharing information about what a diagnosis of dementia means, and things social care staff can do. It is the 11th in a series of factsheets which show how social care staff can support the health needs of people with learning disabilities. The leaflet also includes a link to a supporting slide set that can be used by social care staff as a training resource. (Edited publisher abstract)

Book Full text available online for free

How social care staff can recognise and manage pain in people with learning disabilities

Author:
PUBLIC HEALTH ENGLAND
Publisher:
Public Health England
Publication year:
2017
Pagination:
4
Place of publication:
London

This factsheet provides information for social care staff on how to recognise and manage pain in people with learning disabilities. It is the tenth in a series of factsheets which show how social care staff can support the health needs of people with learning disabilities. The leaflet also includes a link to a supporting slide set that can be used by social care staff as a training resource. (Edited publisher abstract)

Book Full text available online for free

Common health problems that social care staff should be aware of

Author:
PUBLIC HEALTH ENGLAND
Publisher:
Public Health England
Publication year:
2017
Pagination:
4
Place of publication:
London

This factsheet provides information for social care staff on the common health problems that affect people with learning disabilities. These include epilepsy, respiratory diseases, dysphagia, constipation, diabetes and mental health problems. It is the sixth in a series of factsheets which show how social care staff can support the health needs of people with learning disabilities. The leaflet also includes a link to a supporting slide set that can be used by social care staff as a training resource. (Edited publisher abstract)

Journal article

Impact of an individualized planning approach on personal outcomes and supports for persons with intellectual disabilities

Authors:
GOSSE Leanne, et al
Journal article citation:
Journal of Policy and Practice in Intellectual Disabilities, 14(3), 2017, pp.198-204.
Publisher:
Wiley-Blackwell

Planning initiatives for individuals with intellectual disabilities (ID) have shifted from traditional planning primarily conducted by caregivers to an individualised planning approach controlled by the person with ID him/herself. The goal of this paradigm shift is to increase individualisation of supports to accomplish personal objectives and improve quality of life. Despite the widespread acceptance and promotion of individualised planning, there has been little empirical research to demonstrate its effectiveness. This study compares traditional planning to individualised planning on supports obtained and personal objectives accomplished using a randomised between-group design. Persons receiving an individualised planning process improved in both supports and personal outcomes as compared to the traditional planning group. When the traditional planning group subsequently received individualised planning, they replicated the results of the first individualised planning group. The findings support implementation of an individualised planning approach in service agencies for individuals with ID. (Edited publisher abstract)

Journal article

Variation in rates of inpatient admissions and lengths of stay experienced by adults with learning disabilities in England

Authors:
JAMES Elaine, HATTON Chris, BROWN Mark
Journal article citation:
Tizard Learning Disability Review, 22(4), 2017, pp.211-217.
Publisher:
Emerald

Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to analyse rates of inpatient admissions for people with learning disabilities in England and to identify factors associated with higher rates of inpatient admission. Design/methodology/approach: Secondary analysis of data submitted as part of the Transforming Care programme in England. Findings: 2,510 people with learning disabilities in England were inpatients on 31st March 2016. Findings indicate that people with learning disabilities are at risk of higher rate of inpatient admission than can be explained by prevalence within the general population; this risk may be associated with areas where there are higher numbers of inpatient settings which provide assessment and treatment for people with learning disabilities. Research limitations/implications: Variability in the quality of the data submitted by commissioners across the 48 Transforming Care Plan areas mean that greater attention needs to be paid to determining the validity of the common reporting method. This would improve the quality of data and insight from any future analysis. Practical implications: The study’s findings are consistent with the hypothesis that geographical variations in the risk of people with learning disabilities being admitted to inpatient services are not consistent with variations in prevalence rates for learning disability. The findings support the hypothesis that building alternatives to inpatient units should impact positively on the numbers of learning disabled people who are able to live independent lives. Originality/value: This is the first study which examines the data which commissioners in England have reported to NHS England on the experience of people with learning disabilities who are admitted as inpatients and to report on the possible factors which result in higher rates of inpatient admission. (Publisher abstract)

Book Full text available online for free

Delivering high quality end of life care for people who have a learning disability: resources and tips for commissioners, service providers and health and social care staff

Authors:
NHS ENGLAND, PALLIATIVE CARE FOR PEOPLE WITH LEARNING DISABILITIES
Publisher:
NHS England
Publication year:
2017
Pagination:
57
Place of publication:
Redditch

This ‘top tips’ guide aims to support commissioners, providers and clinicians to reduce inequalities in palliative and end of life for people with a learning disability, focusing on ‘The Ambitions for Palliative and End of Life Care’. These six ambitions, which provide a framework for national and local health and care system leaders to take action to improve palliative and end of life care, are: Each person is seen as an individual; Each person gets fair access to care; Maximising comfort and wellbeing; Care is coordinated; All staff are prepared to care; Each community is prepared to help. This document sets how to achieve each ambition, signposts relevant tools and resources and provides good practice examples. (Edited publisher abstract)

Journal article

Adapting compassion focused therapy for an adult with a learning disability: a case study

Authors:
COOPER Rosalind, FREARSON Julia
Journal article citation:
British Journal of Learning Disabilities, 45(2), 2017, pp.142-150.
Publisher:
Wiley-Blackwell

Background: Joe was referred to the Community Learning Disabilities Team (CLDT) for support around low mood and overeating. Initial formulation suggested compassion focused therapy (CFT) as an intervention. The evidence base for using CFT with people with learning disabilities is currently limited. Materials and Methods: Adaptations were made to the CFT framework, accounting for Joe's learning disability. A case study design was used to investigate the effectiveness of intervention. Joe attended 13 sessions of assessment, formulation and intervention. Client feedback was incorporated to assess suitability of the CFT approach and adaptations made. Results and Conclusions: Changes in scores on outcome measures were limited. However, findings from this exploratory study suggest that CFT can be meaningfully adapted for use within the field of learning disabilities. Implications for clinical practice and directions for future research are discussed. (Publisher abstract)

Journal article

A feasibility study into the measurement of physical activity levels of adults with intellectual disabilities using accelerometers and the International Physical Activity Questionnaire

Authors:
DAIRO Yetunde M., COLLETT Johnny, DAWES Helen
Journal article citation:
British Journal of Learning Disabilities, 45(2), 2017, pp.129-137.
Publisher:
Wiley-Blackwell

Background: Few studies have measured physical activity (PA) levels of adults with intellectual disabilities using both objective and subjective methods, but none included individuals with profound intellectual disabilities. To inform effective measurement of PA across the disability spectrum, this study explored: the feasibility of measuring PA levels using the International Physical Activity Questionnaire-short version (IPAQ-s) and a wrist-worn 7-day accelerometer; examined the level of agreement between instruments/raters; and established the recruitment rate. From the literature reviewed, no study has investigated these issues. Materials and Methods: Two-hundred adults with intellectual disabilities from a local authority lists in UK were invited to participate. Participants were administered an accelerometer for seven days and the IPAQ-s (self and carer-reported). Results: Twenty participants with mild to profound intellectual disabilities (20–70 years) were recruited. The response rate was significantly different between home (16%) and residential homes (4%): χ2(1) = 7.7, p < .05. All participants completed the IPAQ-s but only 15 completed 7-day accelerometer. Self and carer-reported PA had perfect agreement on IPAQ-s, and agreements between instruments using PA guidelines was substantial (k = 0.6, p < .05). However, mean moderate-vigorous PA min/week differed between measures at 145 and 207 from IPAQ-s and accelerometer respectively. Conclusions: Recruitment demonstrated a need for better engagement with residential homes. While both the IPAQ-s and accelerometers can be used to evaluate PA levels, the IPAQ-s was more acceptable and carer report was accurate, but it underestimated absolute moderate-vigorous PA levels. These findings indicate that IPAQ-s can be used to measure PA levels, including in those with profound intellectual disabilities. (Publisher abstract)

Journal article

Do levels of evidence affect breadth of service? A study on the use of clinical guidance in a learning disability service

Authors:
PATERAKI Eleni, MACMAHON Kenneth
Journal article citation:
British Journal of Learning Disabilities, 45(2), 2017, pp.121-128.
Publisher:
Wiley-Blackwell

Background: For services across the UK, increasing emphasis is placed on the use of evidence-based psychological treatments. In this context, the Scottish Government published the MATRIX, a best-practice clinical governance document, with a brief section on therapies for people with learning disabilities. As with most clinical guidelines, randomised controlled trials were considered the “gold standard.” However, within the learning disability field, the existing evidence base is relatively limited, resulting in a narrow guidance for services. Methods: This study evaluated the use of best-practice guidance (the MATRIX), in a psychology service for adults with learning disabilities, covering one of the largest NHS Boards in Scotland. A randomly selected 50% (N = 73) of case notes opened since October 2011 (publication date for the MATRIX) was reviewed. Eight case notes were second-rated by an independent clinician. Results: Findings showed that service users typically presented with multiple psychological difficulties, and clinicians offered a range of therapies additional to those suggested in the guidance. This was particularly evident in cases managed by clinical psychologists. Conclusions: Applying rigid therapeutic recommendations may limit opportunities for integrative practice. The potential impact of inflexibly adopting clinical guidelines on service planning and resources is discussed. (Publisher abstract)

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