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Journal article

Arson treatment programmes for offenders with disability: a systematic review of the literature

Authors:
CURTIS Ashlee, McVILLY Keith, DAY Andrew
Journal article citation:
Journal of Learning Disabilities and Offending Behaviour, 3(4), 2012, pp.196-205.
Publisher:
Emerald

A systematic review of the literature was undertaken in order to identify and evaluate treatment for adult fire setters with an intellectual disability. The review also took into account programmes for fire setters in the wider population, including those for children and adolescents, given that such research might also inform the development of programmes for offenders with an intellectual disability. Only four studies which evaluated treatment programmes specifically for arsonists with an intellectual disability were identified. Although each of these studies reported a reduction in fire-setting behaviour following programme completion, all employed relatively weak research designs. An additional 12 studies investigating programmes for arsonists without intellectual disability were also identified. It is concluded that there is a lack of evidence regarding treatment programme outcomes for arsonists with an intellectual disability. The extent to which such programmes can be adapted to suit adult offenders with an intellectual disability is discussed, with recommendations made for the design and evaluation of arson treatment programmes for offenders with intellectual disabilities. (Edited publisher abstract)

Journal article

Experiences of leaving prison for people with intellectual disability

Author:
ELLEM Kathy
Journal article citation:
Journal of Learning Disabilities and Offending Behaviour, 3(3), 2012, pp.127-138.
Publisher:
Emerald

Without adequate supports, people with intellectual disability leaving prison are likely to reoffend. The aim of this paper was to examine the community re-entry experiences of 10 people with an intellectual disability. The findings are drawn from a wider study of prison experiences of people with an intellectual disability in Queensland, Australia. Life stories were developed from in-depth interviews with 10 ex-prisoners (7 male and 3 female) with intellectual disability. Interviews were respectful of the communication styles of participants and involved multiple interview sessions, ranging from 2 to 9 interviews per person. Data were analysed using narrative and thematic analysis. The findings showed that the participants found the process of leaving prison an emotional event, often clouded both with confusion about when release was to occur and uncertainly as to what they could expect on the outside. Their stories highlighted how poorly divergent service models such as corrective services, disability services and mental health services respond to this group, and worked in collaboration to address their complex needs. The findings indicate a vital need for resources for ex-prisoners with intellectual disability for concrete information and coordinated hands-on assistance in negotiating supports in the community.

Journal article

Another way of looking

Authors:
CAMERON Colin, TOSSELL David
Journal article citation:
Social Work Education (The International Journal), 31(2), March 2012, pp.241-245.
Publisher:
Taylor and Francis
Place of publication:
Philadelphia, USA

This article presents the dialogue from a discussion that emerged in response to a dilemma faced by an experienced social work lecturer in planning an introductory life course lecture about people labelled as having learning disabilities. The dilemma related to whether or not to begin with a quote from a parent reflecting on her own feelings shortly after her twin children, aged six months, had been identified as having a congenital impairment. The dialogue in the article was made 13 years later, and involved a recollection of how the mother had felt when seeing a display of skipping ropes in a department store. A discussion ensued concerning how ways of thinking about impairment can be informed by the affirmative model of disability, a recent theoretical development within disability studies. The aim is to illustrate the application of the affirmative model and to provide disabled people/social workers/families with a theoretical tool with which to look differently at impairment and disability and to challenge some traditional assumptions and practices.

Journal article

Helping to keep safe

Authors:
CRONIN Peter, PEYTON Liam
Journal article citation:
Advances in Mental Health and Intellectual Disabilities, 6(6), 2012, pp.291-292.
Publisher:
Emerald

This short paper considers risk from the perspective of people with learning disabilities. The two men narrating their experiences are members of a London-based Tuesday Group which helps people understand about good mental health and staying well. They are both independent but do need some outreach support. The paper explores issues around the risk of unwanted attention and keeping safe when going and how being members of this group has supported them in managing the risks they might face.

Journal article

Narrative accounts of university education: socio-cultural perspectives of students with disabilities

Author:
GIBSON Suanne
Journal article citation:
Disability and Society, 27(3), May 2012, pp.353-369.
Publisher:
Taylor and Francis,

Research in higher education suggests the need for educationalists to show greater understanding and awareness of the lived experiences of undergraduate students with disabilities. It is argued that this knowledge should then be used to inform their understandings as tutors and facilitate inclusive and effective teaching strategies. This research focused on five first-year students with disabilities’ learning experiences; their transitions from school or college to university and their feedback on positive and negative learning experiences at both levels. Rich stories were uncovered taking the research beyond the lecture theatre and seminar room, into the students’ union bar and back to the Year 10 classroom. This paper tells some of the stories shared, in particular drawing out findings related to effective learning practices, and notes the significance of placing a socio-cultural lens on the question of inclusion in education.

Journal article

‘The silence is roaring’: sterilization, reproductive rights and women with intellectual disabilities

Authors:
TILLEY Elizabeth, et al
Journal article citation:
Disability and Society, 27(3), May 2012, pp.413-426.
Publisher:
Taylor and Francis,

This article explores the history of sterilization of women with intellectual disabilities, and considers its relevance to current practice regarding reproductive choice and futures. It provides an overview of published research on historical practices, focusing on the United Kingdom, the United States, Canada and the Nordic countries. Most of this research draws upon written records, centring on eugenics debates. However, emerging oral history testimonies gathered by the authors suggest that sterilization procedures were also conducted in the community, the result of private negotiations between parents and medical practitioners. The article presents these accounts and calls for an end to the silence on this issue.

Journal article

The Stage Life: promoting the inclusion of young people through participatory arts

Authors:
STICKLEY Theodore, CROSBIE Brian, HUI Ada
Journal article citation:
British Journal of Learning Disabilities, 40(4), December 2012, pp.251-258.
Publisher:
Wiley-Blackwell

This article discusses the “Stage Life” participatory arts programme for people attending a day services provision in Nottinghamshire. It was provided in a local disused cinema acquired by the local authority for community-based activities amongst disadvantaged groups. The Stage Life aimed to build the community arts capacity for young adults with learning disabilities by introducing approximately fifty people to participatory arts activities over a period of 2 years. A multimethod ethnographic approach was used to phenomenologically capture the impact of the Stage Life upon individuals’ lives, as well as capture people’s opinions and ideas regarding taking part in the activities. The research describes the effects upon people who were engaged with the programme. Positive benefits are reported both on a personal and on a social level. The authors concluded that joining in with arts activities helped people with learning disabilities to feel a part of the community.

Journal article

Examining the support needs of ageing family carers in developing future plans for a relative with an intellectual disability

Authors:
TAGGART Laurence, et al
Journal article citation:
Journal of Intellectual Disabilities, 16(3), September 2012, pp.217-234.
Publisher:
Sage
Place of publication:
London

Due to the increased life expectancy of people with intellectual disability, they are now more likely to be living with an ageing family carer. The aim of this study was to examine the support needs of ageing family carers in developing future plans for a relative with an intellectual disability. A mixed methods design was employed. In stage 1, a structured questionnaire was used to collate information on the health, caregiving demands and future planning preferences of 112 parent and sibling carers aged 60–94 years. In stage 2, 19 in-depth semi-structured interviews were undertaken with a sample of carers to explore a range of issues around future planning. Over half of the carers were lone carers, mainly female, with many reporting a wide range of health problems. The main preference was for the person to remain in the family home, with either the family or paid staff to support them. A minority of parent carers preferred the person to move into the home of a sibling, although some favoured the person moving to a residential facility with other people with intellectual disabilities. Four main themes were identified around future planning: unremitting apprehension; the extent of planning; obstacles encountered; and solutions for future planning. Avoidance, lack of guidance and a lack of appropriate residential provision were cited as obstacles to making future plans compounded by the emotional upset experienced by carers in thinking about the future.

Journal article

Dr Tulp attends the soft machine: patient simulators, user involvement and intellectual disability

Authors:
McCLIMENS Alex, LEWIS Robin, BREWSTER Jacqui
Journal article citation:
Journal of Intellectual Disabilities, 16(3), September 2012, pp.173-182.
Publisher:
Sage
Place of publication:
London

Simulation may be seen as an effective educational strategy to address the growing moral and ethical issues around ‘practising’ on human patients. Patient simulators are very useful when the student learner needs to practise invasive techniques on an unconscious patient. Simulation works much less well where the technology is unable to replicate the ‘bio-fidelity’ associated with real life situations. For example, the utility of simulation models rapidly diminishes when the patient is conscious and has communication difficulties, and when the clinical interventions are more ‘social’ in nature. The article argues that patient simulation is of limited use for some patient populations such as people with intellectual disability and with a wide range of impairment, communication and mobility issues. Students must be able to see beyond the equipment and connect their learning to actual human beings.

Journal article

Alcohol and intellectual disability: personal problem or cultural exclusion?

Author:
SIMPSON Murray
Journal article citation:
Journal of Intellectual Disabilities, 16(3), September 2012, pp.183-192.
Publisher:
Sage
Place of publication:
London

Studies on alcohol use among adults with intellectual disabilities suggest that their usage is significantly less than the general population, with very high levels of abstinence. Despite this, the literature focuses almost exclusively on the people who do have problems, attempting to lead to the conclusion that adults with intellectual disabilities are more vulnerable to alcohol misuse. This article tries to show that this approach is deeply flawed and is both predicated on and leads to an impoverished view of alcohol use. The aim is to reorient the discussion to make it more culturally sensitive, less focussed on alcohol ‘problems’ and more geared towards the socially constructive aspects of drinking. Today, in the majority of countries, alcohol plays a major role in the cultural lives of most people. We might therefore expect to see access to alcohol feature as part of general strategies for helping people with intellectual disabilities to overcome social exclusion and become more full participants in their communities. The article opens up new lines of exploration around the significance of abstinence, why it might occur to such a high degree and whether, in fact, it might itself be and also point towards the cultural exclusion of people with intellectual disabilities.

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