Filter results

Register/log in to your SCIE account to use the search filters below

Search results for ‘Subject term:"learning disabilities"’ Sort:  

Results 1 - 10 of 527

Journal article

Defining learning disability

Author:
-
Journal article citation:
Viewpoint, 120, January 2011, pp.16-19.
Publisher:
Mencap/Gateway

As Mencap reviews its definition of learning disability, this article presents a number of different definitions from a range of organisations.

Journal article

Psychotherapy with persons with intellectual disabilities: a review of effectiveness research

Authors:
PROUT H. Thompson, BROWNING Brooke K.
Journal article citation:
Advances in Mental Health and Intellectual Disabilities, 5(5), 2011, pp.53-59.
Publisher:
Emerald

This review aims to provide an update on the effectiveness of psychotherapy with persons with intellectual disabilities. It summarises the conclusions of other reviews published in the last ten years, including a recent review by the authors. There is evidence that psychotherapy with persons with intellectual disabilities is at least moderately effective. There is also evidence of effectiveness of psychotherapy across child and adolescent and adult age groups. A range of therapeutic interventions are effective and a spectrum of problems can be addressed via psychotherapy. However the authors found relatively little relevant research literature and noted a lack of methodologically sound and rigorous studies. They suggest there is a need for well-designed studies, particularly randomised controlled trials, better specification of treatments (e.g. manualised), better outcome measures, and clearer specification of diagnostic categories within the intellectual disability population.

Journal article

Measuring the actual levels and patterns of physical activity/inactivity of adults with intellectual disabilities

Authors:
FINLAYSON Janet, TURNER Angela, GRANAT Malcolm H.
Journal article citation:
Journal of Applied Research in Intellectual Disabilities, 24(6), November 2011, pp.508-517.
Publisher:
Wiley-Blackwell

Adults with intellectual disabilities experience higher rates of morbidity and mortality associated with low levels of activity compared to the general population. Previous research on physical activity levels in this group suggests as few as 5% could be meeting the target levels of exercise deemed necessary for a healthy lifestyle. The aim of this pilot study was to objectively measure the levels and patterns of activity of adults with intellectual disabilities, to inform the design of studies aimed at increasing activity and health in this population. Interviews were conducted with 62 community-based adults from Glasgow with mild to moderate intellectual disabilities (mean age 37 years, 56.5% female). Participants were interviewed at the start and at the end of a 7-day period of physical activity/inactivity measurement using an activity monitor. Forty-one (66%) participants wore the activity monitor for at least 5 days. Of these, only 11 (27%) achieved the recommended 10 000 steps per day, and only six (15%) were achieving the recommended 30 minutes of moderate/vigorous activity at least 5 days per week. The data confirm the belief that adults with mild to moderate learning disabilities have low levels of physical activity.

Journal article

Ball and chain

Author:
CLAWSON Rachael
Journal article citation:
Learning Disability Today, April 2011, pp.26-28.
Publisher:
Pavilion
Place of publication:
Hove

Children and adults with learning disabilities can be at risk from forced marriage. This article discusses the risk and possible consequences of forced marriage, and the role of professionals in preventing abuse. It also highlights key factors which differentiate forced marriages of people with learning disabilities from those without.

Book Full text available online for free

The estimated prevalence of visual impairment among people with learning disabilities in the UK

Authors:
EMERSON Eric, ROBERTSON Janet
Publisher:
Public Health England
Publication year:
2011
Pagination:
35p.
Place of publication:
London

It has been known for some time that visual impairments are more common among people with learning disabilities, especially people with more severe learning disabilities, and that the presence of visual impairments can significantly impair the independence and quality of life of people with learning disabilities. The aim of this report is to estimate how many people with learning disabilities in the UK are likely to have visual impairments. The report suggests that, at present, approximately 50,000 people with learning disabilities who are known to services in the UK have visual impairment. An additional 15,000 are blind. Whilst most children with learning disabilities are known to services, not all adults with learning disabilities are known to adult health or social care learning disabilities services – it is estimated that there may be an additional 44,000 adults with learning disabilities and visual impairment and 11,000 with learning disabilities and blindness. It is estimated that all of these figures will rise by approximately 0.5% each year over the next two decades.

Book Full text available online for free

Review of compliance: Castlebeck Care (Teesdale) Ltd.: Winterbourne View

Author:
CARE QUALITY COMMISSION
Publisher:
Care Quality Commission
Publication year:
2011
Pagination:
45p.
Place of publication:
London

Winterbourne View is a 24-bed purpose designed Assessment and Treatment Unit providing healthcare and support for adults with learning disabilities, complex needs and challenging behaviour. It is operated by  Castlebeck Care (Teesdale) Ltd. This review was carried out following the BBC television programme Panorama which showed the serious abuse of patients at Winterbourne View over several months. The review found that Winterbourne View was not meeting 10 essential standards. Concerns resulted in the Care Quality Commission taking enforcement action to remove Winterbourne View from the registration of Castlebeck Care (Teesdale) Ltd.

Book Full text available online for free

Structured observational research in services for people with learning disabilities

Author:
MANSELL Jim
Publisher:
NIHR School for Social Care Research
Publication year:
2011
Pagination:
31p.
Place of publication:
London

The authors review structured observational research, primarily in services for people with learning disabilities. Observational research is of particular value where people using services are unable to answer interviews or questionnaires about their experiences, and where proxy respondents may not be sufficiently accurate sources of data. The review illustrates the use of observational data in assessing and improving the quality of services. Drawing on the published research evaluating services for people with learning disabilities, it deals with the question of what to observe and how to define it so that the information gathered is valid and reliable. It discusses sampling in order to obtain representative information, considers the practical steps that have to be taken in order to make observations in services, and, using examples from the research literature, it shows how to analyse and present observational data.

Book

Discovering Camphill: new perspectives, research and developments

Editors:
JACKSON Robin, (ed.)
Publisher:
Floris Books
Publication year:
2011
Pagination:
336p.
Place of publication:
Edinburgh

Bringing together research from scholars and experts in a variety of disciplines, the editors explore a broad range of issues which affect Camphill life. The essays examine social, political and educational topics including; spiritual needs, residential childcare, disabled identity, working with autistic children and the development of Camphill communities around the world. It is suggested that the lack of easily accessible literature about Camphill communities has contributed to a common perception of Camphill as 'closed' communities which have little interest in communicating with the 'the outside world'. Some influential officials and practitioners who determine education and social-work policy and practice are believed to know little about Camphill, thus increasing the risk of misunderstanding and threatening the future of Camphill communities. The book has two main aims; to report on the finding of research on several Camphill communities, and to discuss societal trends which may impact on the future of the Camphill movement. This book seeks not only to bridge the knowledge gap about Camphilll but also to demonstrate to a wider audience the unique and inspiring qualities of Camphill communities. The book is expected to be of interest to those with an interest in the provision of services for children and adults with special needs.

Journal article

Young people within the criminal justice system: making sense of fitness to plead and mental capacity in practice

Author:
HEPWORTH Karina
Journal article citation:
Journal of Learning Disabilities and Offending Behaviour, 2(4), 2011, pp.170-177.
Publisher:
Emerald

Early recognition of a person's mental capacity are crucial to ensure the right pathway is taken through the criminal justice system. Whether this be supporting the person to undertake their Order and delivery of an appropriate and understandable intervention or diversion away from the criminal justice system into services. Information sharing and working together are key factors to success. As a learning disability nurse within a Youth Offending Service, the author encounters young people on court Orders who struggle to understand the criminal justice process. To highlight the significance of this, and its relationship to practice, the article discusses a particular young person's case. The author concludes that learning disability nurses and those professionals working within learning disability services have a significant part to play in this area of work and can help to ensure that people with learning disabilities do not face injustice.

Book

Supporting parents with learning disabilities and difficulties: a starting point

Author:
DISABILITY, PREGNANCY AND PARENTHOOD INTERNATIONAL
Publisher:
Disability, Pregnancy and Parenthood International
Publication year:
2011
Pagination:
44p.
Place of publication:
London

Of an estimated 53,000 parents with a learning disability in England, around half will face the family courts, and the removal of their children from their care. Yet when parents' individual support needs are addressed, many are able to successfully develop parenting skills and care for their own children. However, professionals are often ill equipped to provide the support needed. This booklet is aimed at professionals and students who work with parents with a learning disability. It contains a brief introduction to some of the issues faced by this group of parents, along with a collection of resources and contacts. These include: national organisations, websites and contacts that can provide further information; local projects and services; accessible information for parents; tools, guidance and resources for professionals; and further reading for professionals.

Key to icons

  • Free resource Free resource
  • Journal article Journal article
  • Book Book
  • Digital media Digital media
  • Journal Journal

Give us your feedback

Social Care Online continues to be developed in response to user feedback.

Contact us with your comments and for any problems using the website.

Sign up/login for more

Register/login to use standard search filters, access resource links, advanced search and email alerts