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Book Full text available online for free

Connecting people: the steps to making it happen

Author:
WIGHTMAN Clare
Publisher:
Foundation for People with Learning Disabilities
Publication year:
2009
Pagination:
17p., DVD
Place of publication:
London

This report concerns people with higher support needs, whose treatment, it says, is scandalous. It discusses connecting with people, why building relationships matters, getting the basics right, knowing what community connecting looks like, ending with tips for connectors on asking.

Journal article

Weighting the weights: agreement among anthropometric indicators identifying the weight status of people with intellectual disabilities

Authors:
VERSTRAELEN C. J. F., et al
Journal article citation:
Journal of Applied Research in Intellectual Disabilities, 22(3), May 2009, pp.307-313.
Publisher:
Wiley-Blackwell

The aims of this study were (1) to determine to what extent body mass index (BMI), waist circumference, fat free mass index (FFMI) and skinfold thickness are feasible measurement options in people with intellectual disabilities (ID) to measure their weight status, and (2) to assess the level of agreement among these methods. BMI, waist circumference, FFMI derived from the Bioelectrical Impedance Analyser and skinfold thickness were all determined in 76 people with intellectual disabilities. BMI and waist circumference could be measured in all subjects. Skinfold thickness and FFMI failed in, respectively, five and 14 people. In general, intertest reliabilities were low. For underweight people, the agreement was acceptable. BMI and waist circumference were feasible measurement options. Agreements among the methods were low. Implications of these results are discussed.

Journal article

Weight status of persons with intellectual disabilities

Authors:
MAASKANT Marian A., et al
Journal article citation:
Journal of Applied Research in Intellectual Disabilities, 22(5), September 2009, pp.426-432.
Publisher:
Wiley-Blackwell

The weight and weight status of a group of people with learning disabilities in the Netherlands were studied in 2002 and 2007, to examine the differences in weight and weight status between 2002 and 2007 and the risk groups for (becoming) overweight/obese. The mean increase in Body Mass Index (BMI) between 2002 and 2007 was 0.8 (2.2 kg). In 2002, 36% of the study group was overweight/obese; this was higher in 2007: 45%. The expected relationship between increase in BMI and the change in living circumstances could not be confirmed. Further research into health-control programmes, weight status, food-intake and physical exercise is recommended.

Journal article

Architects of reform

Author:
KAEHNE Axel
Journal article citation:
Learning Disability Today, 9(5), July 2009, pp.34-36.
Publisher:
Pavilion
Place of publication:
Hove

Highlights the key themes from a series of research papers delivered at a round table summit involving academics and practitioners from the US, UK, Netherlands, Germany and Australia looking at what really improves lives for people with learning disabilities.

Journal article

Understanding predictors of low physical activity in adults with intellectual disabilities

Authors:
FINLAYSON Janet, et al
Journal article citation:
Journal of Applied Research in Intellectual Disabilities, 22(3), May 2009, pp.236-247.
Publisher:
Wiley-Blackwell

Lack of regular physical activity is globally one of the most significant risks to health. The main aims of this study were to describe the types and levels of regular physical activity undertaken by adults with intellectual disabilities, and to investigate the factors predicting low activity. Interviews were conducted with a community-based sample of adults with intellectual disabilities (n = 433) at two time points. Data hypothesized to be predictive of low levels of activity were collected at time 1. Descriptive data were collected on the frequency and intensity, and actual level of participation in activities at time 2. Only 150 (34.6%) adults with intellectual disabilities undertook any regular activity of at least moderate intensity. This was of shorter duration, compared with the general population. Older age, having immobility, epilepsy, no daytime opportunities, living in congregate care and faecal incontinence were independently predictive of low levels of activity. These results are a step towards informing the development of interventions to promote the health of adults with intellectual disabilities through increased physical activity

Journal article

Coming alive as Olivia

Author:
ASPIS Simone
Journal article citation:
Community Living, 22(3), Spring 2009, p.12.
Publisher:
Hexagon Publishing

The author interviews Olivia Lightfeet, a man with learning disabilities who wants to become a women. Olivia is People First's Diversity Officer and currently trains self-advocacy groups in diversity issues, including those to do with transsexuals and transgender.

Book Full text available online for free

Hidden pain?: self-injury and people with learning disabilities: summary of findings

Authors:
HESLOP Pauline, MACAULEY Fiona
Publisher:
Bristol Crisis Service for Women
Publication year:
2009
Pagination:
4p.
Place of publication:
Bristol

This summary reports the key findings from a 3-year research project which aimed to obtain the views of people with learning disabilities about their self-injury. It is based on the views of 25 people with learning disabilities and personal experience of self-injury who took part in up to 4 research interviews each. The people with learning disabilities were aged between 14 and 65 and lived in the United Kingdom in a variety of different living arrangements. In addition, interviews were also conducted with 15 family members and 33 professionals. The most common types of self-injury were found to be scratching, cutting their skin and hitting themselves. Half of the participants reported engaging in these behaviours. The next most frequently reported types of self-injury were self-biting, taking an overdose and hitting out at something else such as a wall or hard object. All but 5 of the participants engaged in more than one type of self-injury. This summary provides an overview of the key findings of the project, including the circumstances and feelings leading up to self-injury and what are considered to be helpful forms of support. Recommendations for the care of people with learning disabilities to address their self-injury are provided.

Book Full text available online for free

Hidden pain?: self-injury and people with learning disabilities

Authors:
HESLOP Pauline, MACAULAY Fiona
Publisher:
Bristol Crisis Service for Women
Publication year:
2009
Pagination:
116p., bibliog.
Place of publication:
Bristol

This report presents the findings from a 3-year research project which aimed to obtain the views of people with learning disabilities about their self-injury. It is based on the views of 25 people with learning disabilities and personal experience of self-injury who took part in up to 4 research interviews each. The people with learning disabilities were aged between 14 and 65 and lived in the United Kingdom in a variety of different living arrangements. In addition, interviews were also conducted with 15 family members and 33 professionals. The most common types of self-injury were found to be scratching, cutting their skin and hitting themselves. Half of the participants reported engaging in these behaviours. The next most frequently reported types of self-injury were self-biting, taking an overdose and hitting out at something else such as a wall or hard object. All but 5 of the participants engaged in more than one type of self-injury. This report covers: people with learning disabilities’ experiences of self-injury; circumstances leading up to their self-injury; their feelings before self-injuring; how they try to stop themselves self-injuring; the circumstances for people with learning disabilities after self-injuring; what they consider to be helpful and less helpful forms of support; family members and professionals’ views about self-injury; and the impact on family members and professionals of supporting a person with learning disabilities who self-injures.

Book Full text available online for free

Hidden pain?: people with learning disabilities who hurt themselves

Authors:
HESLOP Pauline, MACAULAY Fiona
Publisher:
Bristol Crisis Service for Women
Publication year:
2009
Pagination:
4p.
Place of publication:
Bristol

This document is an easy read summary which provides the key findings from a research project which aimed to obtain the views of people with learning disabilities about their self-injury. It is based on interviews of 25 people with learning disabilities and personal experience of self-injury. The key findings of the project are described, including why people hurt themselves and the circumstances leading up to their self-injury, and how people try to stop hurting themselves and the support they need to do this. Other resources for people with learning disabilities who hurt themselves are listed.

Journal article

Commentary on Social inclusion: life after 'day services'

Author:
KIDD Jo
Journal article citation:
Tizard Learning Disability Review, 14(2), April 2009, pp.21-24.
Publisher:
Emerald

Comments on an article by Alan Leyin and Natalie Kauder which looked at the level of inclusion of people with a learning difficulty, by monitoring community-based activities prior to, and following, the closure of two small day service facilities. The author agrees that people simply 'being in the community' is not enough to ensure they become 'part of the community'. Different types and levels of support appropriate to the individuals need should be provided to ensure inclusion.

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