Filter results

Register/log in to your SCIE account to use the search filters below

Search results for ‘Subject term:"learning disabilities"’ Sort:  

Results 1 - 10 of 1372

Journal article

Care staff perceptions of choking incidents: what details are reported?

Authors:
GUTHRIE Susan, LECKO Caroline, RODDAM Hazel
Journal article citation:
Journal of Applied Research in Intellectual Disabilities, 28(2), 2015, pp.121-132.
Publisher:
Wiley-Blackwell

Background: Following a series of fatal choking incidents in one UK specialist service, this study evaluated the detail included in incident reporting. This study compared the enhanced reporting system in the specialist service with the national reporting and learning system. Methods: Eligible reports were selected from a national organisation and a specialist service using search terms relevant to adults with intellectual disability and/or mental ill health. Qualitative analysis was completed with comparison of themes identified in both sets of reports. Findings: The numbers of choking incidents identified in national reports suggest under-reporting compared with the specialist service and varying levels of severity. Themes included trends in timing, care setting and food textures as perceived by staff. Conclusions: This study demonstrates paucity of detail in reporting in systems without additional question prompts. Adding these questions requires staff to include greater detail which enables learning and risk mitigation to take place. (Edited publisher abstract)

Journal article

Ball and chain

Author:
CLAWSON Rachael
Journal article citation:
Learning Disability Today, April 2011, pp.26-28.
Publisher:
Pavilion
Place of publication:
Hove

Children and adults with learning disabilities can be at risk from forced marriage. This article discusses the risk and possible consequences of forced marriage, and the role of professionals in preventing abuse. It also highlights key factors which differentiate forced marriages of people with learning disabilities from those without.

Journal article

Research unpacked: damage limitation

Authors:
HESLOP Pauline, MACAULAY Fiona
Journal article citation:
Learning Disability Today, 10(1), January 2010, pp.16-18.
Publisher:
Pavilion
Place of publication:
Hove

This article describes a study which looked at how people with learning disabilities who self-injure make sense of their self-injury and what they say would help most. Twenty-five people with learning disabilities and personal experience of self-injury took part in 1 to 4 research interviews between 2006 and 2008. All the participants were able to describe examples of circumstances leading up to their self-injury. These included external factors over which the participant had little control such as not being listened to, interpersonal factors such as being bullied, and internal factors caused for example by particular thoughts or memories. The participants identified the feelings they experienced before self-injuring, the most common being angry, sad, depressed, low, frustrated, or wound up. Over three-quarters of the participants considered that having someone to talk to who would listen to them would help, and also wanted someone to help look after their injuries. Being encouraged not to self-injure was considered helpful by some and unhelpful by others. The article concludes that the results challenge existing practice which considers that nothing can be done, and indicate the need to work with each person individually to help them use coping strategies. Creating conditions where people with learning disabilities have choice and control over their lives is also important.

Journal article

Architects of reform

Author:
KAEHNE Axel
Journal article citation:
Learning Disability Today, 9(5), July 2009, pp.34-36.
Publisher:
Pavilion
Place of publication:
Hove

Highlights the key themes from a series of research papers delivered at a round table summit involving academics and practitioners from the US, UK, Netherlands, Germany and Australia looking at what really improves lives for people with learning disabilities.

Journal article

Reflections on deinstitutionalization in the United Kingdom

Authors:
HAMLIN Alexandra, OAKES Peter
Journal article citation:
Journal of Policy and Practice in Intellectual Disabilities, 5(1), 2008, pp.47-55.
Publisher:
Wiley-Blackwell

Deinstitutionalization has been the hallmark of public policy for people with intellectual disabilities within many countries in the developed world for the past 40 years. Although within Britain deinstitutionalization is set to be completed by the end of 2008, beyond the simple closure of hospitals, the success of this initiative can at best be seen as uncertain. Although huge structural change has been achieved, the initiative's outcomes in terms of reduced distress, mainstreamed services, and enriched networks of relationships, require further examination. In order to reinstate the possibility of transformation in the lives of people with intellectual disabilities, it is necessary to return to an analysis of the relationship between people with intellectual disabilities, their supporters, formal services, and the community as a whole. One way of reflecting on these relationships is through an examination of the discourses that characterize them. The authors reflect on the themes of protection, power and humanity, and the manner in which these have survived the physical closure of long-term care hospitals. The continuation of deinstitutionalization is understood as requiring consideration of the institution in terms of the discourses that were prevalent within it. The transformation of services now depends on changes within these discourses and change now needs to be focused on relationships that challenge institutional discourses.

Journal article

A step towards personalised learning

Author:
LITTLE Peter
Journal article citation:
Adults Learning, 19(5), January 2008, pp.12-13.
Publisher:
National Institute for Adult Continuing Education

This article explores the development of the Foundation Learning Tier (FLT). It is a recent provision which, it is hoped, will facilitated personalised and flexible learning for learners with learning and other disabilities.

Journal article

Challenging behaviours: prevalence and topographies

Authors:
LOWE K., et al
Journal article citation:
Journal of Intellectual Disability Research, 51(8), August 2007, pp.625-636.
Publisher:
Wiley

Variations in reported prevalence of challenging behaviour indicate the need for further epidemiological research to support accurate planning of future service provision. All services providing for people with learning disabilities across seven unitary authorities, with a total population of 1.2 million, were screened to identify people with challenging behaviour. Interviews were conducted with primary carers to gain data on identified individuals' characteristics and support. Measures designed for a similar study conducted in Manchester University were incorporated to allow direct comparison with earlier findings, together with standardized tools to assess adaptive behaviour and social impairment. In total, 4.5 (2.5–7.5) people per 10,000 population were rated as seriously challenging, representing 10% (5.5–16.8%) of the learning disability population; the most prevalent general form was other difficult/disruptive behaviour, with non-compliance being the most prevalent topography. The majority showed multiple behaviours and multiple topographies within each general behaviour category. Also identified were substantial numbers of additional people reported as presenting challenging behaviours at lower degrees of severity. Prevalence rates for seriously challenging behaviours were comparable to those reported in the earlier studies, thus confirming previous findings. The prevalence of less serious challenging behaviour also has major clinical significance and emphasizes the need for enhanced understanding and skills among personnel within primary- and secondary-tier health, education and social care services, and for strengthening the capacity of community teams to provide behavioural expertise.

Journal article

Symbols can improve the reading comprehension of adults with learning disabilities

Authors:
JONES F.W., LONG K., FINLAY W.M.L.
Journal article citation:
Journal of Intellectual Disability Research, 51(7), July 2007, pp.545-550.
Publisher:
Wiley

This study aimed to test the hypothesis that adding symbols to written text can improve its comprehensibility for adults with learning disabilities. Nineteen adults with mild or borderline learning disabilities attempted to read four short passages of text, two of which had Widgit Rebus symbols added to them. Following each passage, they were asked questions to test their comprehension. A counterbalanced design was employed. Participants’ comprehension scores were significantly higher for the symbolized passages than the non-symbolized ones. It is concluded that adding symbols to written text can make comprehension easier for some adults with mild and borderline learning disabilities.

Journal article Full text available online for free

Just the job

Author:
SALE Anabel Unity
Journal article citation:
Community Care, 24.08.06, 2006, pp.28-29.
Publisher:
Reed Business Information

This article looks at the employment options for people with learning disabilities who wish to join the mainstream workforce.

Book

Am I making myself clear?: Mencap's guidelines for accessible writing

Author:
MENCAP
Publisher:
MENCAP
Publication year:
2000
Pagination:
28p.
Place of publication:
London

This pamphlet gives advice about how to write with consideration for people with cognitive impairments and learning difficulties.

Key to icons

  • Free resource Free resource
  • Journal article Journal article
  • Book Book
  • Digital media Digital media
  • Journal Journal

Give us your feedback

Social Care Online continues to be developed in response to user feedback.

Contact us with your comments and for any problems using the website.

Sign up/login for more

Register/login to use standard search filters, access resource links, advanced search and email alerts