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Journal article

Measuring the actual levels and patterns of physical activity/inactivity of adults with intellectual disabilities

Authors:
FINLAYSON Janet, TURNER Angela, GRANAT Malcolm H.
Journal article citation:
Journal of Applied Research in Intellectual Disabilities, 24(6), November 2011, pp.508-517.
Publisher:
Wiley-Blackwell

Adults with intellectual disabilities experience higher rates of morbidity and mortality associated with low levels of activity compared to the general population. Previous research on physical activity levels in this group suggests as few as 5% could be meeting the target levels of exercise deemed necessary for a healthy lifestyle. The aim of this pilot study was to objectively measure the levels and patterns of activity of adults with intellectual disabilities, to inform the design of studies aimed at increasing activity and health in this population. Interviews were conducted with 62 community-based adults from Glasgow with mild to moderate intellectual disabilities (mean age 37 years, 56.5% female). Participants were interviewed at the start and at the end of a 7-day period of physical activity/inactivity measurement using an activity monitor. Forty-one (66%) participants wore the activity monitor for at least 5 days. Of these, only 11 (27%) achieved the recommended 10 000 steps per day, and only six (15%) were achieving the recommended 30 minutes of moderate/vigorous activity at least 5 days per week. The data confirm the belief that adults with mild to moderate learning disabilities have low levels of physical activity.

Journal article

Understanding predictors of low physical activity in adults with intellectual disabilities

Authors:
FINLAYSON Janet, et al
Journal article citation:
Journal of Applied Research in Intellectual Disabilities, 22(3), May 2009, pp.236-247.
Publisher:
Wiley-Blackwell

Lack of regular physical activity is globally one of the most significant risks to health. The main aims of this study were to describe the types and levels of regular physical activity undertaken by adults with intellectual disabilities, and to investigate the factors predicting low activity. Interviews were conducted with a community-based sample of adults with intellectual disabilities (n = 433) at two time points. Data hypothesized to be predictive of low levels of activity were collected at time 1. Descriptive data were collected on the frequency and intensity, and actual level of participation in activities at time 2. Only 150 (34.6%) adults with intellectual disabilities undertook any regular activity of at least moderate intensity. This was of shorter duration, compared with the general population. Older age, having immobility, epilepsy, no daytime opportunities, living in congregate care and faecal incontinence were independently predictive of low levels of activity. These results are a step towards informing the development of interventions to promote the health of adults with intellectual disabilities through increased physical activity

Journal article

Resisting having learning disabilities by managing relative abilities

Authors:
MCVITTIE Chris, GOODALL Karen E., MCKINLAY Andy
Journal article citation:
British Journal of Learning Disabilities, 36(4), December 2008, pp.256-262.
Publisher:
Wiley-Blackwell

Previous research has shown that identities and the attributes from which identities are inferred are negotiated within social interaction and language. The identity of having learning disabilities is commonly associated with ascriptions of lesser abilities than other people, and in turn might be inferred from such abilities. This study examines how individuals, potentially ascribed with an identity of having learning disabilities, discursively manage the ascription of abilities and disabilities relative to other people. Semi-structured interviews were carried out with eight individuals attending a community centre in Edinburgh categorised as having learning disabilities. Interview transcripts were coded for all references to relative abilities and analysed using discourse analysis. The participants displayed three orientations towards abilities, namely (i) ascribing deficits to 'others', (ii) resisting comparisons of deficit and (iii) claiming 'normal' attributes. For the participants, these negotiations of relative abilities provide ways of managing specific aspects of identities associated with learning disabilities.

Journal article

Supported employment for people with learning disabilities: the case of full-time work

Author:
McINALLY George
Journal article citation:
Tizard Learning Disability Review, 13(3), October 2008, pp.42-46.
Publisher:
Emerald

North Lanarkshire Council's supported employment has achieved a reputation for delivering full-time work for people who have learning disabilities. Since 1999, the service has accessed 175 jobs, and current supports 127 individuals who work more than 16 hours a week. This article describes how the approach taken by North Lanarkshire can be adopted by other authorities.

Book Full text available online for free

Getting work and being included

Author:
OUTSIDE THE BOX
Publisher:
Outside the Box Development Support
Publication year:
2006
Pagination:
4p.
Place of publication:
Glasgow

Outside the Box will be working with people in Borders who have learning disabilities and people with mental health problems, to look at what helps people get into work. The first stage of the project is looking at what helps people get into work and what the problems are and about different types of work. Ways to get involved in the project are outlined.

Book Full text available online for free

Borders Finding Out project: employment workshop

Author:
BORDERS FINDING OUT PROJECT
Publisher:
Outside the Box Development Support
Publication year:
2006
Pagination:
18p.
Place of publication:
Glasgow

The Borders Finding Out project brings together people who have learning disabilities, families, people who work in services for people with learning disabilities and people who are interested in everyone having the chance to do what they want. A report from a workshop in Hawick on 16 November 2006 with the Fife Employability Team is presented. The benefits of people with learning disabilities working are outlined.

Book Full text available online for free

An easy guide to direct payments in Scotland: giving you choice and control over your social work services

Author:
SCOTTISH CONSORTIUM FOR LEARNING DISABILITY
Publisher:
Scottish Consortium for Learning Disability
Publication year:
2005
Pagination:
31p.
Place of publication:
Glasgow

A book aimed at people who may be using direct payments. It outlines how direct payments work and the new rules covering direct payments which started in June 2003. It uses picture case studies to illustrate how direct payments work.

Book Full text available online for free

A guide for parents. The Education (Additional Support for Learning)(Scotland) Act 2004: 2nd edition

Author:
SCOTLAND. Scottish Executive
Publisher:
Scotland. Scottish Executive
Publication year:
2004
Pagination:
6p.
Place of publication:
Edinburgh
Edition:
2nd ed.
Book Full text available online for free

The same as you?: a review of services for people with learning disabilities: a summary

Author:
SCOTLAND. Scottish Executive. Social Work Services Inspectorate
Publisher:
Scotland. Scottish Executive
Publication year:
2000
Pagination:
2p.
Place of publication:
Edinburgh
Journal article

The pattern of alcohol consumption within a sample of mentally handicapped people in Tayside

Authors:
LAWRENCE Helen, LINDSAY William R., WALKER Phyllis
Journal article citation:
Mental Handicap Research, 8(1), 1995, pp.54-59.
Publisher:
BIMH Publications

The drinking pattern occurring amongst people with learning difficulties in Dundee was investigated. The main conclusions are that fewer individuals actually reported drinking alcohol and fewer weekly units are consumed, than is found in the general population. A need for general alcohol education was identified since only one-third of the sample appreciated the potential dangers associated with alcohol and none knew, specifically, what these dangers might be.

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