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Book

Day services in the nineties for people with learning difficulties in Northern Ireland

Authors:
FLYNN Margaret, THOMAS Derek
Publisher:
Northern Ireland. Department of Health and Social Services. Social Services Insp
Publication year:
1991
Pagination:
23p.
Place of publication:
Belfast
Book Full text available online for free

Health inequalities and people with a learning disability

Author:
BLACK Lesley-Ann
Publisher:
Northern Ireland Assembly. Research and Information Service
Publication year:
2013
Pagination:
26
Place of publication:
Belfast

This paper examines the evidence relating to the health inequalities faced by people with a learning disability, who have diverse needs and will often experience multiple health problems. The paper also considers policy developments from the Department of Health, Social Services and Public Safety (DHSSPS) in terms of addressing health inequalities in the learning disability population in Northern Ireland. These include the Bamford Action Plans (2009-2011 and 2012-2015) and a Service Framework for Learning Disability (2012). (Edited publisher abstract)

Journal article

Beyond friendship: the nature and meaning of close personal relationships as perceived by people with learning disabilities

Authors:
LAFFERTY Attracta, McCONKEY Roy, TAGGART Laurence
Journal article citation:
Disability and Society, 28(8), 2013, pp.1074-1088.
Publisher:
Taylor and Francis,

This study uses a combination of dyadic and one-to-one interviews with eight couples with learning disabilities in Northern Ireland to gain a better understanding of the meaning and value these relationships bring to their lives. Data collection and analysis was informed and guided by the core principles of grounded theory. Five significant types of benefits were identified from having close personal relationships, namely: comradeship, a sense of contentment, availability of mutual support, coping with the ups and downs of relationships, and a continuing commitment. Service providers could do more to facilitate the formation of close meaningful relationships, and strategies for doing this need to be identified and evaluated. (Edited publisher abstract)

Book Full text available online for free

Views and experiences of people with learning disability in relation to policing arrangements in Northern Ireland

Author:
SOCIAL MARKET RESEARCH
Publisher:
Police Ombudsman for Northern Ireland; Northern Ireland Policing Board
Publication year:
2011
Pagination:
251p.
Place of publication:
Belfast

The report is the outcome of a major research project co-funded by the Police Ombudsman’s Office and the Policing Board into the issues faced by people with learning disabilities when dealing with the police and policing organisations. Almost 300 people with learning disabilities, along with key workers and organisations in the learning disability sector, and representatives of the police, policing organisations and criminal justice bodies were consulted during the project. The study found that people with learning disabilities had largely positive views and experiences of the police. But it also found that many instances of bullying and harassment of people with learning disabilities were likely to go unreported because the victims did not realise that they had been a victim of crime, or were unwilling to report it. The report makes a total of 24 recommendations to help ensure that the police and policing organisations respond appropriately to the needs of people with learning disabilities, and also to help combat disability hate crime.

Book Full text available online for free

No one knows: identifying and supporting prisoners with learning difficulties and learning disabilities: the views of prison staff in Northern Ireland

Authors:
LOUCKS Nancy, TALBOT Jenny
Publisher:
Prison Reform Trust
Publication year:
2008
Pagination:
50p., bibliog.
Place of publication:
London

This report is one in a series of reports and briefing papers from No One Knows. It sets out the views of prison staff in Scotland on how prisoners with learning difficulties and learning disabilities are identified and supported. The report begins with an outline of the aims and methods for this particular study. It then briefly provides the context for prisoners with learning difficulties and learning disabilities in Scotland. The main body of the report covers the views of prison staff regarding how prisoners with learning difficulties or learning disabilities are identified and supported in their prisons. The conclusion sets out the main findings, together with preliminary recommendations for change and ways to build on existing good practice.

Journal article

Examining pre-retirement and related services offered to service-users with an intellectual disability in Ireland

Authors:
LAWRENCE Stephanie, ROUSH S.E.
Journal article citation:
Journal of Intellectual Disabilities, 12(3), September 2008, pp.239-252.
Publisher:
Sage
Place of publication:
London

The purpose of this study was to describe the pre-retirement and related services offered to service-users with intellectual disability in Ireland. Increasing numbers of service-users with an intellectual disability are living into older adulthood, creating important challenges for services providers. The National Intellectual Disability Database 2007 (NIDD) suggests that the population of service-users with an intellectual disability in the Republic of Ireland is an ageing population. Significant ongoing demands for new retirement-related intellectual disability services and enhancement of existing services are indicated. It is unknown how to support the development of a retirement policy to meet this growing need. The findings of this survey study indicate that there is, in general, recognition among Ireland's service providers of the need for retirement options for this population, although little attention has been directed towards formalizing these services through policy-making. There are few retirement policies in place, limiting the implementation of comprehensive services to meet the changing needs of ageing adults with an intellectual disability.

Book Full text available online for free

At home in the community?: promoting the social inclusion of people with a learning disability living in supported accommodation

Authors:
COLLINS Suzanne, McCONKEY Roy
Publisher:
Triangle Housing Association; University of Ulster
Publication year:
2007
Pagination:
70p.
Place of publication:
Ballymoney

This report highlights the social exclusion of people with a learning disability in Northern Ireland. This  study, funded by the Big Lottery Fund, details the extent of social isolation experienced by tenants in various forms of supported accommodation provided by a range of agencies throughout Northern Ireland.   Many have no friends outside of the place where they live and much of their time is spent within the home.

Book

At home in the community?: promoting the social inclusion of people with a learning disability living in supported accommodation: easy read version

Authors:
COLLINS Suzanne, McCONKEY Roy
Publisher:
Triangle Housing Association; University of Ulster
Publication year:
2007
Pagination:
12p.
Place of publication:
Ballymoney

This report highlights the social exclusion of people with a learning disability in Northern Ireland. This  study, funded by the Big Lottery Fund, details the extent of social isolation experienced by tenants in various forms of supported accommodation provided by a range of agencies throughout Northern Ireland.   Many have no friends outside of the place where they live and much of their time is spent within the home.

Book

The Disability Discrimination (Northern Ireland) Order 2006: statutory rule 2006 no. 312 (N.I. 1)

Author:
NORTHERN IRELAND
Publisher:
Stationery Office
Publication year:
2006
Pagination:
1p.
Place of publication:
Belfast

Minor grammatical corrections The Disability Discrimination (Northern Ireland) Order 2006: statutory rule 2006 no. 312.

Journal article

Art as therapy: an effective way of promoting positive mental health?

Author:
HEENAN Deidre
Journal article citation:
Disability and Society, 21(2), March 2006, pp.179-191.
Publisher:
Taylor and Francis,

The aim of this study is to evaluate the contribution that creative arts can play in promoting positive mental health and well-being. The research is based on a case study of an innovative art therapy programme delivered by a community-based mental health organisation in Northern Ireland, as part of a supported recovery programme. The study reported here explored the experiences and perceptions of the service users through in-depth interviews and focus groups. The art as therapy course was credited with improvements in self-esteem and self-confidence. It provided a safe space for reflection on mental health issues. Participants described the programme as cathartic and a springboard for engagement in a wide range of further projects. It is concluded that this type of project which addresses mental health issues in a supportive, positive, non-clinical environment can encourage and facilitate empowerment and recovery through accessible creative programmes. However, to date these programmes are time-limited, small-scale and marginal to the approach adopted by statutory service providers.

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