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Journal article

Weight status of persons with intellectual disabilities

Authors:
MAASKANT Marian A., et al
Journal article citation:
Journal of Applied Research in Intellectual Disabilities, 22(5), September 2009, pp.426-432.
Publisher:
Wiley-Blackwell

The weight and weight status of a group of people with learning disabilities in the Netherlands were studied in 2002 and 2007, to examine the differences in weight and weight status between 2002 and 2007 and the risk groups for (becoming) overweight/obese. The mean increase in Body Mass Index (BMI) between 2002 and 2007 was 0.8 (2.2 kg). In 2002, 36% of the study group was overweight/obese; this was higher in 2007: 45%. The expected relationship between increase in BMI and the change in living circumstances could not be confirmed. Further research into health-control programmes, weight status, food-intake and physical exercise is recommended.

Journal article

Architects of reform

Author:
KAEHNE Axel
Journal article citation:
Learning Disability Today, 9(5), July 2009, pp.34-36.
Publisher:
Pavilion
Place of publication:
Hove

Highlights the key themes from a series of research papers delivered at a round table summit involving academics and practitioners from the US, UK, Netherlands, Germany and Australia looking at what really improves lives for people with learning disabilities.

Journal article

Mixed impressions

Author:
WARD Linda
Journal article citation:
Community Care, 7.5.92, 1992, pp.22-23.
Publisher:
Reed Business Information

Looks at the provision of village communities for people with learning difficulties in the Netherlands.

Journal article

Modification of motivational interviewing for use with people with mild intellectual disability and challenging behaviour

Authors:
FRIELINK Noud, EMBREGTS Petri
Journal article citation:
Journal of Intellectual and Developmental Disability, 38(4), 2013, pp.279-291.
Publisher:
Informa Healthcare

Background: Motivational interviewing is a promising method to increase treatment motivation for people with mild intellectual disability and challenging behaviour. The purpose of the present study was to identify how professionals could adapt motivational interviewing techniques for use with clients. Method: The authors conducted semistructured qualitative interviews and focus groups with 26 clients, parents, and professionals. A general inductive approach led to the identification of multiple core themes. Results: The authors recommend several modifications to accommodate motivational interviewing for use with clients: adapt to language level, adjust to cognitive abilities, and control for social desirability of responding. In addition, certain characteristics of professionals were also found to be critical for effective motivational interviewing: trustworthiness, engagement, acceptance, empathy, and honesty. Conclusions: Concrete recommendations for the adaptation of the motivational interviewing techniques for use with people with mild intellectual disability and challenging behaviour are identified. Certain characteristics of professionals are also critical for maximising the treatment motivation of clients. (Publisher abstract)

Journal article

Development and preliminary validation of the QUALITRA-ID-P: a user-orientated questionnaire for parents and relatives to assess the quality of care and service trajectories for intellectually disabled persons

Authors:
BARELDS Anna, et al
Journal article citation:
Journal of Applied Research in Intellectual Disabilities, 24(5), September 2011, pp.468-481.
Publisher:
Wiley-Blackwell

Care and service trajectories for people with intellectual disabilities are routes within the health care delivery system that consist of all the steps that the individual and their families have to take in order to achieve their required care and services. The aim of this article is to describe the development and the preliminary validation of a user-orientated questionnaire for parents or relatives of people with intellectual disability (QUALITRA-ID-P) to assess the quality of care and service trajectories of their children or relatives with intellectual disability. The article starts by presenting the conceptualisation and operationalisation of quality of care and service trajectories. It then describes how the QUALITRA-ID-P was constructed using the findings identified in the conceptualisation and operationalisation stages. The QUALITRA-ID-P was refined in 2 stages: examination of feasibility, understandability and completeness; and preliminary validation. The final QUALITRA-ID-P is a 49-item scale with good reliability and validity. Care providers can use the QUALITRA-ID-P to understand better the experiences of quality of their clients’ relatives and as a result improve the quality of trajectories.

Journal article

The views of clients with mild intellectual disabilities regarding their working relationships with caregivers

Authors:
ROEDEN John M., MAASKANT Marian A., CURFS Leopard M.G.
Journal article citation:
Journal of Applied Research in Intellectual Disabilities, 24(5), September 2011, pp.398-406.
Publisher:
Wiley-Blackwell

A good relationship between the client and his caregiver is a key factor in a positive treatment outcome, with research indicating that the client’s opinion about the quality of the working alliance is a stronger predictor of treatment outcome than the opinion of the professional. Many treatment programmes, including solution focused brief therapy (SFBT), strive to encourage a positive client-caregiver relationship. The aim of this study is to gain insight into what clients with intellectual disabilities feel contributes to a successful working relationship with caregivers. The study participants were 18 clients of an organisation providing support to people with intellectual disabilities. Data was collected using the nominal group technique (NGT), which was modified for use with people with intellectual disabilities. The project demonstrates that the NGT is a valuable instrument in bringing to the fore of the opinions and priorities of clients with intellectual disabilities. The findings revealed that the way in which caregivers deliver their support is important. The specific qualities that are valued are reliability, empathy, and a non-patronising attitude. The particular types of support seem to be less influential in terms of treatment success. Furthermore, the results show that the clients’ preferred ways of receiving help correspond with the basic assumptions in SFBT.

Journal article

Solution-focused brief therapy with persons with intellectual disabilities

Authors:
ROEDEN John M., et al
Journal article citation:
Journal of Policy and Practice in Intellectual Disabilities, 6(4), December 2009, pp.253-259.
Publisher:
Wiley-Blackwell

Solution-Focused Brief Therapy (SFBT) is a short-term, goal-focused, and client-directed therapeutic approach that helps the client to generate solutions rather than dwell on problems. SFBT has rarely been used with clients with intellectual disabilities (ID). The authors discuss how this relatively new form of therapy in an adapted form can be made suitable for clients with ID. The assumptions of this therapeutic approach, the types of problems and settings addressed by SFBT and a description of the interventions used are considered. Indications and contraindications for SFBT and empirical data on the effectiveness of the therapy are discussed with regard to clients with or without ID. Tailoring SFBT to clients with ID can be done by using simple language, modified interventions and inserting other adaptations into the therapy process. Research is needed to demonstrate whether SFBT if effective with this target group can and to what extent it is valued by clients and their carers.

Journal article

Care and service trajectories for people with intellectual disabilities: defining its course and quality determinants from the client's perspective

Author:
BARELDS Anna
Journal article citation:
Journal of Policy and Practice in Intellectual Disabilities, 6(3), September 2009, pp.163-172.
Publisher:
Wiley-Blackwell

Care and service trajectories are identifiable routes through service systems that consist of all steps that people with intellectual disabilities (ID) and their families have to take to realize the care and services they need. Trajectories are especially prominent during the transitions from children's services to adult services. Within a service system in Noord-Brabant (in the Netherlands), the authors examined the course of such trajectories and their main bottlenecks and sought to identify their quality determinants. The first research question was addressed by an exercise in document analysis and the holding of semistructured interviews with key informants within the healthcare sector specialized for serving people with ID. A second research question was addressed by means of a literature review on integrated care. The authors observe that trajectories generally follow a "model route" consisting of five phases but may vary according to age category, degree of disability, and life domain. With respect to "bottlenecks," the authors noted that a lack of suitable supply and long waiting lists are good examples. They found that the literature on integrated care revealed that continuity, accessibility, availability, and flexibility of care and services, together with the seamlessness of transitions, are all important quality determinants for people with ID when judging their service trajectories. Bottlenecks and quality determinants of trajectories are strongly interrelated. The authors concluded that the literature and the key informants agree as to which factors are most important in realizing high-quality trajectories for individual clients. They recommend asking which criteria people with ID and their families value most when judging the quality of trajectories.

Journal article

Hearing aids: expectations and satisfaction of people with an intellectual disability, a descriptive pilot study

Authors:
MEUWESE-JONGEJEUGD A., VERSCHUURE H., EVENHUIS H.M.
Journal article citation:
Journal of Intellectual Disability Research, 51(11), November 2007, p.913–922.
Publisher:
Wiley

In spite of an increased risk of hearing impairment in persons with an intellectual disability (ID), rehabilitation with hearing aids often fails. The authors performed a descriptive pilot study with the following study questions: 1 Do comparable elements as in the general population contribute to expectations of and satisfaction with hearing aids in adults with mild or moderate IDs? 2 To what extent do adults with an ID depend on carers in use and maintenance of hearing aids? 16 adults with a mild or moderate ID and a recent diagnosis of hearing impairment participated in the study. Information was gathered by means of specially designed booklets; semi-structured interviews prior to hearing aid fitting and 6 months afterwards. In total, 14/16 participants were able to give reliable answers. Most were aware of their hearing loss and familiar with reasons for hearing aids. A minority expressed positive expectations. Some expressed explicit wishes on the looks of hearing aids. All satisfaction domains as described for the general population could be recognized. Most participants were partially or totally dependent on carers in use and maintenance of hearing aids. Adults with ID may have explicit ideas and wishes about hearing aids and, if specifically asked, are capable of expressing these. Given information should be checked and repeated. In satisfaction with hearing aids, comparable elements may play a role as in the general population: benefit, cosmetics, sound quality/acoustics, comfort/ease of use, and service delivery. These findings, however, are from a small-scale study. Additional research is necessary to find out whether they are applicable more generally.

Journal article

Accessible website content guidelines for users with intellectual disabilities

Authors:
KARREMAN Joyce, van der GEEST Thea, BUURSINK Esmee
Journal article citation:
Journal of Applied Research in Intellectual Disabilities, 20(6), November 2007, pp.510-518.
Publisher:
Wiley-Blackwell

The W3C Web Accessibility Initiative has issued guidelines for making websites better and easier to access for people with various disabilities (W3C Web Accessibility Initiative guidelines 1999). The usability of two versions of a Dutch website (a non-adapted site and a site that was adapted on the basis of easy-to-read guidelines) was tested with two groups of 20 participants. One group had intellectual disabilities but could read, the other group had no identified intellectual disabilities. In a 2 × 2 experimental design, it was investigated whether the easy-to-read website was indeed better accessible and usable for the participants with intellectual disabilities. The adaptation of the website worked well for participants with intellectual disabilities. Users without identified intellectual disabilities were as effective with the adapted site as they were with the non-adapted site. The results form an empirical basis for recommendations about applying guidelines for easy-to-read text on websites for people with intellectual disabilities.

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