Filter results

Register/log in to your SCIE account to use the search filters below

Search results for ‘Subject term:"learning disabilities"’ Sort:  

Results 1 - 10 of 122

Journal article

On the right road to Dublin

Author:
KING Jane
Journal article citation:
Community Care, 15.3.90, 1990, pp.28-29.
Publisher:
Reed Business Information

Open Road in Dublin is a three-year project which has placed twelve young men and women with learning difficulties in 'real' as opposed to sheltered employment.

Journal article

Co-researching with people who have intellectual disabilities: insights from a national survey

Authors:
O'BRIEN Patricia, McCONKEY Roy, GARCIA-IRIARTE Edurne
Journal article citation:
Journal of Applied Research in Intellectual Disabilities, 27(1), 2013, pp.65-75.
Publisher:
Wiley-Blackwell

In undertaking a national study exploring what life was like in Ireland for people with intellectual disabilities, a community of practice was developed involving a core group of co-researchers: five people with intellectual disabilities, four university researchers and three service support staff. An additional cadre of 15 co-researchers with intellectual disabilities was recruited to undertake data gathering and analysis with 23 focus groups involving 168 participants. The research experience was documented through oral feedback, progress reports, minutes and a project review. The key learning is documented arising from the setting up of an inclusive advisory group and implementation of each of six research steps. The study demonstrates feasibility and the added value of university co-researchers recruiting and developing skills together with co-researchers with intellectual disabilities. Topics for further research and development are identified. (Edited publisher abstract)

Journal article

Issues emanating from the implementation of policies on restraint use with people with intellectual disabilities

Authors:
RICKARD Eion David, CHAN Jeffrey, MERRIMAN Brian
Journal article citation:
Journal of Policy and Practice in Intellectual Disabilities, 10(3), 2013, pp.252-259.
Publisher:
Wiley-Blackwell

This article first outlines some of the negative consequences of restraint use that have led to minimal use policies and then outlines some of the alternative interventions and strategies that are emerging as alternatives. Recent changes in the regulation of restraint use in the Republic of Ireland and the state of Victoria in Australia are then examined, to show how cultural and historical contexts of policy can lead to differences. The authors argue that a gap remains between our understanding of the place of implementing restrictive practices with respect to service provision and their actual applications by providers. They conclude that such discordance between policy and practice needs to be addressed by stronger regulation. (Original abstract)

Journal article

Non-verbal communication between Registered Nurses Intellectual Disability and people with an intellectual disability: an exploratory study of the nurse’s experiences. Part 2

Authors:
MARTIN Anne-Marie, O'CONNOR-FENELON Maureen, LYONS Rosemary
Journal article citation:
Journal of Intellectual Disabilities, 16(2), June 2012, pp.97-108.
Publisher:
Sage
Place of publication:
London

This second of two articles presents findings from a qualitative study which investigated the experiences of Registered Nurses Intellectual Disability (RNIDs) of communicating with people with an intellectual disability who communicate non-verbally in Ireland. Part 1 discussed the background, context and methodology along with category of ‘familiarity/knowing the person’. This article explores the themes and subthemes encapsulated within this category. Each theme is considered in the light of current policies and strategies influencing the provision of services to people with an intellectual disability. Overall, the results suggest that the RNID is ideally located and key to supporting the implementation of these policies and strategies due to their highly developed and proficient skill set as well as experience of communicating with people with an intellectual disability who communicate non-verbally. Implications for practice are presented.

Journal article

Intellectual disability nursing in Ireland: identifying its development and future

Authors:
DOODY Owen, SLEVIN Eamonn, TAGGART Lawrence
Journal article citation:
Journal of Intellectual Disabilities, 16(1), March 2012, pp.7-16.
Publisher:
Sage
Place of publication:
London

Intellectual disability nursing is one of the smallest branches of nursing in Ireland. As the discipline of intellectual disability nursing is unique to Ireland and the United Kingdom, there is a responsibility on intellectual disability nurses to identify their unique identity and their responses to the demands of changing services. Since its inception as an individual nursing profession in 1959 in Ireland, both education and service provision philosophies have changed over time. These changes have been in response to national and international reports and changing attitudes. The history of the care of persons with an intellectual disability in Ireland was originally one of institutional care and segregation from the community, but in the 1980s a social model of care began to be implemented. Intellectual disability nurse education in Ireland is currently a 4-year undergraduate course. Over the years, the discipline has been subject to much debate, relating to the nature of intellectual disability nursing and the knowledge, skills and role of nurses working in this area. This article traces the development of intellectual disability nursing in Ireland, identifying its educational development, service changes and future position.

Journal article

Families’ views on their relatives with intellectual disability moving from a long-stay psychiatric institution to a community-based intellectual disability service: an Irish context

Author:
DOODY Owen
Journal article citation:
British Journal of Learning Disabilities, 40(1), March 2012, pp.46-54.
Publisher:
Wiley-Blackwell

In Ireland in recent years there has been a shift regarding the care of people with intellectual disability from a psychiatric hospital to residential homes within both community- and campus-based accommodation. This study aimed to explore families’ views regarding the movement of people with intellectual disability from a long-stay psychiatric institution to campus-based accommodation within a local intellectual disability service. The client group involved in the transfer consisted of 36 individuals who moved to 6 campus-based bungalows. Interviews were conducted with 11 family members and the data transcribed. Two key themes were identified: the positive transition resulting from the move; and the enlightened thinking that has developed as a consequence of the move. Overall the families expressed positive thoughts about the move to community houses, believing that life was better for their family members in the community compared to the institution. The study indicates the importance of care and care delivery from the family’s perspective, and the interaction of staff with families.

Book Full text available online for free

A host of opportunities: second NHSN survey of family based short break schemes for children and adults with intellectual and other disabilities in the Republic of Ireland

Author:
HANRAHAN Des
Publisher:
National Home-sharing and Short Breaks Network
Publication year:
2010
Pagination:
70p., bibliog.
Place of publication:
Mullingar

The National Home-Sharing and Short Breaks Network is an association which supports the use, promotion and provision of host family based services for Irish citizens with intellectual disability, physical disability and autism. While the majority of respite services are centre based, the family-based model of providing short breaks to people with disabilities involves recruiting approved individuals, couples and families who agree to provide personalised breaks in their own homes as an alternative to traditional residential respite. In this report the terms short breaks with volunteer host families or paid contract families, and home sharing provided by host families are used in place of respite care and residential care respectively.  The report describes the methodology for the questionnaire based survey of 30 schemes, run by 12 separate organisations, that provided overnight breaks with host families. It presents information from the survey about the hosts, the guests, and other issues. It concludes with a discussion of the findings, and makes recommendations for policy makers, managers and further research.

Journal article

A study of complicated grief symptoms in people with intellectual disabilities

Authors:
DODD P., et al
Journal article citation:
Journal of Intellectual Disability Research, 52(5), May 2008, pp.414-425.
Publisher:
Wiley

Previous studies have shown a significant association between familial bereavement and the onset of challenging behaviours and psychopathology in people with intellectual disabilities (ID). However, little work has been done to accurately describe the specific symptoms of grief, in particular symptoms of complicated grief in this population. Consensus criteria for the diagnosis of complicated grief have been drawn up and tested for validity in the general population. This study aimed to examine the occurrence of symptoms of complicated grief, and to explore the relationships between complicated grief and bereavement experience. A bereavement history questionnaire and a newly developed measure examining for symptoms of complicated grief were administered to a group of carers of people with mild or moderate ID, who had experienced a parental bereavement within the previous 2 years. The sample was recruited from two large voluntary agencies providing residential and day services to people with ID in Dublin. The questionnaires were also administered to a matched comparison group, who had not been bereaved. This carer-based comparison study has revealed that bereaved individuals with ID experience complicated grief symptoms following the death of a parent, with one-third of the bereaved group experiencing 10 or more clinically apparent symptoms. In addition, complicated grief symptoms were more likely to occur with higher rates of bereavement ritual involvement. These findings have both clinical and research implications.

Journal article

Correspondence between self-ratings and key-workers' ratings of depression in adults with mild learning disabilities

Authors:
GORDON Michael S., et al
Journal article citation:
British Journal of Clinical Psychology, 46(4), November 2007, pp.491-495.
Publisher:
Wiley-Blackwell

This study assessed the association between self-ratings and key-worker ratings of depression in people with mild learning disabilities. The Zung Depression Scale was completed by 74 adults with mild learning disabilities and a modified version of the questionnaire was completed by two key-workers at two periods in time. The correlations between ratings of depression by key-workers were high and key-worker ratings correlated significantly with self-rating. The depression scores were found to be temporally stable. The findings suggest that proxy raters appear to be able to make reliable and valid judgements about other people's self-reported levels of depression.

Journal article

Geographical barriers to mental health service care among individuals with an intellectual disability in the Republic of Ireland

Authors:
RAMSAY Hugh, et al
Journal article citation:
Journal of Policy and Practice in Intellectual Disabilities, 13(4), 2016, pp.261-268.
Publisher:
Wiley-Blackwell

People with an intellectual disability (ID) are more likely to experience mental health difficulties than others. The United Nations (UN) Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD) states that health services should be provided close to people's own communities. This article examines differences in access to psychiatry services for those with an ID according to geography, in the context of a small European country (Republic of Ireland). The sample consisted of 753 individuals aged 40 and over with ID in the Republic of Ireland, with data collected from the Intellectual Disability Supplement of the Irish Longitudinal Study on Aging (IDS-TILDA). The primary outcome of interest was attendance with any psychiatrist and the primary independent variables were area of residence (health service region and degree of county urbanicity). Logistic regression was used to analyse associations, unadjusted and then controlling for age group, gender and level of ID. Secondary analysis examined factors associated with anti-psychotic prescription without psychiatrist supervision. Treatment by a psychiatrist was associated with both health region (p = 0.029) and degree of urbanicity (p = 0.015) before controlling for group differences but only the health region was significantly associated after controlling for age, gender and level of ID. Antipsychotic use without a psychiatrist was associated with degree of urbanicity (p = 0.036) but not with health service region (p = 0.989). Geographic factors are associated with access to mental health services among those with ID in the Republic of Ireland. This may be partly due to movement of people with ID away from their area of origin, highlighting the need for locally tailored specialist ID mental health teams and for further research into barriers to treatment. Additional work in other countries will further understanding of similar roles of geographic factors in mediating mental health services access. (Edited publisher abstract)

Key to icons

  • Free resource Free resource
  • Journal article Journal article
  • Book Book
  • Digital media Digital media
  • Journal Journal

Give us your feedback

Social Care Online continues to be developed in response to user feedback.

Contact us with your comments and for any problems using the website.

Sign up/login for more

Register/login to use standard search filters, access resource links, advanced search and email alerts