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Journal article

Life skills for young adults with learning disabilities

Author:
DEREKA Maria
Journal article citation:
Tizard Learning Disability Review, 9(3), July 2004, pp.14-20.
Publisher:
Emerald

Looks at the influence of normalisation on teachers' practice in Greek adult training centres and more specifically at curricula for young adults with learning disabilities. Examines whether the curriculum emphasises social and life skills through activities outside the learning environment, and the difficulties teachers face teaching these skills. Data were gathered through questionnaires and interviews with 44 teachers. Results suggest teachers avoid teaching life and social skills relating to activities outside the centre. Students visit mainly local shops and far fewer theatres, cinemas and public buildings, and in most such visits remain passive attendants without learning much in the way of life skills. Obstacles to teaching such skills outside centres are mainly lack of assistants, lack of time and lack of parental co-operation. It is difficult for teachers to reduce classroom teaching time and give students the opportunity to apply knowledge outside.

Journal article

Progress in intellectual disabilities services in Greece: diagnostic, educational and vocational services

Authors:
TSIANTIS J., et al
Journal article citation:
Journal of Intellectual Disabilities, 10(2), June 2006, pp.99-104.
Publisher:
Sage
Place of publication:
London

This editorial describes the extent and progress of services for people with learning disabilities in Greece and focuses specifically on the areas of diagnostic services, education and employment, and making recommendations for prioritizing service developments for people with intellectual disabilities in order to promote equal treatment, social inclusion and quality of life of these people.

Book

Sheltered employment in five member states of the Council of Europe: Austria, Finland, Norway, Sweden and Switzerland

Authors:
SAMOY Erik, WATERPLAS Lina
Publisher:
Council of Europe
Publication year:
1997
Pagination:
67p.,bibliogs.
Place of publication:
Strasbourg

Comparative study looking at the situation of sheltered employment in the twelve Member States of the European Union. The data for each country is grouped under the following headings: institutional context; target population; access to sheltered employment; characteristics of the people in sheltered employment; and a discussion of the topics currently under debate around sheltered employment in each country.

Journal article

Social rights and civil society: 'giving force' without 'enforcement'

Author:
O'BRIEN Nick
Journal article citation:
Journal of Social Welfare and Family Law, 34(4), 2012, pp.459-470.
Publisher:
Taylor and Francis
Place of publication:
Philadelphia, USA

In this article, the author explores the effectiveness of equality, human rights and ombudsman institutions in giving force to social rights. The article presents and discusses 3 specific examples of the institutional protection and promotion of equality rights: the strategic approach of the Disability Rights Commission in Britain between 2000 and 2007; the engagement of the Greek Parliamentary Ombudsman with civil society to give practical effect to European equality law, especially in respect of the Roma community; and the work of the Health Service Ombudsman in England in promoting health equality for people with learning disabilities. It asserts that in each of these examples the mobilisation of equality law, and indirectly of social rights entitlement, is dependent upon the activation of civil society and intermediate institutions.

Journal article

Young children's attitudes toward peers with intellectual disabilities: effect of the type of school

Authors:
GEORGIADI Maria, et al
Journal article citation:
Journal of Applied Research in Intellectual Disabilities, 25(6), November 2012, pp.531-541.
Publisher:
Wiley-Blackwell

Inclusion of children with special educational needs in mainstream schools is now common practice in a variety of countries. Peer acceptance constitutes an important determinant of successful inclusion. The aim of this study was to explore typically developing children's attitudes towards peers with intellectual disabilities, with reference to the type of school they attended. The participants were 256 typically developing children aged 9–10. Approximately half (135) were in inclusive settings. The participants completed the Gash questionnaire on attitudes towards inclusion. They also drew a child with intellectual disabilities and commented on their drawings. The findings showed that typically developing children expressed overall neutral attitudes towards peers with intellectual disabilities. The type of school differentiated their attitudes, with children from inclusive settings being more positive towards peers with intellectual disabilities and choosing less negative adjectives to describe them than children from non-inclusive settings. Girls and students who expressed more positive social, emotional and overall attitudes towards students with intellectual disabilities chose more positive adjectives to describe a child with intellectual disabilities. It was also found that children from inclusive settings drew children with intellectual disabilities as more similar to a child with Down syndrome in comparison with children from non-inclusive settings.

Journal article

Speed of naming in children with Williams and Down syndromes

Authors:
YPSILANTI Antonia, et al
Journal article citation:
Journal of Intellectual and Developmental Disability, 31(2), June 2006, pp.87-94.
Publisher:
Informa Healthcare

Williams syndrome (WS) and Down syndrome (DS) are two neurodevelopmental genetically based disorders which exhibit mental retardation with a unique cognitive profile. Naming in individuals with WS and DS has been investigated in several studies, with results indicating that the performance of children with WS and DS is at a similar level and below mental age expectations on naming tasks.  Speed of naming pictures, colours, numbers, letters and words was assessed in 8 individuals with WS, 10 individuals with DS, and 18 mental age controls. All stimuli were presented on a computer monitor and reaction times for naming were recorded. Our results indicated that speed of naming in children with DS and WS is not statistically different to that of mental age controls. However, error analysis in naming words and pictures revealed qualitative differences between the three groups. These results challenge the tenet of increased naming speed in children with WS compared to mental age controls. The findings are discussed in the light of current evidence concerning the linguistic abilities of children with neurodevelopmental disorders and those with typical development.

Journal article

Prevalence and correlates of depression in late life: a population based study from a rural Greek town

Authors:
PAPADOPOULOS F. C., et al
Journal article citation:
International Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry, 20(4), April 2005, pp.350-357.
Publisher:
Wiley-Blackwell

Depression in late life is common and has serious consequences on function, medical co-morbidity, quality of life, and use of medical services. The aim was to estimate the age- and gender-specific prevalence of depression among people over 60 years of age, and to examine correlates of depression, in particular the relationship between depression and cognitive impairment. From a total of 965 inhabitants, aged over 60 years, in Velestino, a rural town in central Greece, 608 were accessible and constituted the target population. During a five-month period in 2000, a trained health visitor interviewed all study participants. The interview covered socio-demographic characteristics, medical history, and administration of the 15-question Geriatric Depression Scale (GDS-15) and the Mini Mental Scale Examination instrument (MMSE). The prevalence of mild or more severe depression (GDS7) was 27%, while the prevalence of moderate to severe depression (GDS11) was 12%. Increasing age, female gender, lower education, and being currently unmarried were associated with higher risk of depression in univariate regression models, but these associations disappeared after controlling for cognitive function, except for the association with marital status. Cognitive impairment was strongly associated with increased risk for depression. The co-morbid presence of digestive, neurological and heart conditions was also associated with increased risk for depression, while cancer was not. In a rural Greek area, the prevalence of depression in late life is high. Depression was more common among unmarried individuals, those with significant cognitive impairment, and in association with specific medical conditions.

Journal article

Care staff awareness training on mental health needs of adults with learning disabilities: results from a Greek sample

Authors:
TSIANTIS J., et al
Journal article citation:
Journal of Learning Disabilities, 8(3), September 2004, pp.221-235.
Publisher:
Sage

The mental health needs of adults with learning disabilities have not been adequately addressed in many European countries. Although carers can play a significant role in identification and referral, they usually lack the expertise necessary to identify signs of mental disorders. This study evaluated a care staff training programme aiming at improving awareness on issues of dual diagnosis in a group of 36 care staff from residential and community centres in Greece. Training was based on the British Mental Health in Learning Disabilities Training Pack and the PAS–ADD Checklist. The overwhelming majority of staff were very satisfied with training. Staff from institutional work settings, with no previous training on dual diagnosis and with a lower level of education, benefited to a significant degree. Changes occurred mostly in their knowledge and attitudes rather than practice. Supervised practical training is vital to transfer, strengthen and maintain positive changes at work.

Journal article

Greece

Author:
PADELIADU Susana
Journal article citation:
Tizard Learning Disability Review, 9(1), January 2004, pp.24-30.
Publisher:
Emerald

Provides an overview of services for people with intellectual disabilities in Greece, which can be described as versatile and based on both old and new structures, old, over-crowded institutions co-existing with new, alternative structures for independent living. Distinguishing features of the support system are limited financial resources, a strong orientation to medical categories in psychiatry and lack of specific services. There are still many people with intellectual disabilities being treated in mental health services. The gap in services is filled by informal networks, which face a crisis because of the increasing participation of women in the labour market. One of the many deficiencies of the present system is the lack of any sound knowledge of how many people with intellectual disabilities there are, who they are, how they cope with their disabilities and what services they use. This article covers: definition, legal status and eligibility; policy framework; service structures and funding of services.

Journal article

Expectations of Greek parents about employment opportunities for their child with learning disabilities: implications for social workers

Authors:
ARONI Despoina, HEGARTY John, PHILALITHIS Anastas
Journal article citation:
Journal of Social Work Practice: Psychotherapeutic Approaches in Health, Welfare and the Community, 27(4), 2013, pp.357-373.
Publisher:
Taylor and Francis
Place of publication:
Philadelphia, USA

A survey was carried out in Heraklion, Crete, to determine the expectations on employment of all parents who had a child with learning disabilities (LDs) between the age of 14 and 45 years, living with them and having participated in some educational or vocational programme for at least 1 year. From the 310 families, which fulfilled the criteria for admission in the current study, 176 families participated. The research method chosen was a structured interview. The results demonstrated that parents expected their LD child not to work or to work in a sheltered workshop whereas, ideally, most parents wanted some form of competitive employment for their children. The findings suggest that social workers and other professionals should inform parents more positively about the potential abilities of their children and emphasise the importance of a job for all parties involved. (Publisher abstract)

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