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Journal article

Architects of reform

Author:
KAEHNE Axel
Journal article citation:
Learning Disability Today, 9(5), July 2009, pp.34-36.
Publisher:
Pavilion
Place of publication:
Hove

Highlights the key themes from a series of research papers delivered at a round table summit involving academics and practitioners from the US, UK, Netherlands, Germany and Australia looking at what really improves lives for people with learning disabilities.

Journal article

Commentary on ‘Deinstitutionalisation and community living for people with intellectual disabilities in Austria’

Author:
WEINBACH Hanna
Journal article citation:
Tizard Learning Disability Review, 14(1), February 2009, pp.14-17.
Publisher:
Emerald

Comments on a paper from Tobias Buchner which outlined the situation of deinstitutionalisation and community living in Austria. The author looks at the similarities between the situation in Austria to that of Germany, and the difficulties of the transition process.

Journal article

Cross-cultural measurement of critical quality of life concepts

Authors:
KEITH Kenneth D., HEAL Laird W., SCHALOCK Robert L.
Journal article citation:
Journal of Intellectual and Developmental Disability, 21(4), December 1996, pp.273-293.
Publisher:
Informa Healthcare

A semantic differential technique was used to assess the meaning of 10 quality of life (QOL) concepts across seven cultures: Australia, England, Finland, Germany, Japan, Republic of China, and the United States. Each concept was rated on nine pairs of adjectives representing three dimensions (value, potency, or activity). Across the 7 countries all 10 of the QOL concepts received strong positive ratings on the value dimension, and lower positive ratings on the potency and activity dimensions. Japan, however, was an exception to the general pattern with Japanese raters assigning negative ratings for value and activity and positive ratings for potency. The results are discussed in relation to the differences between individualistic and collective cultures.

Journal article

Public bus drivers and social inclusion: evaluation of their knowledge and attitudes toward people with intellectual disabilities

Authors:
TILLMANN Vera, et al
Journal article citation:
Journal of Policy and Practice in Intellectual Disabilities, 10(4), 2014, pp.307-313.
Publisher:
Wiley-Blackwell

Public bus drivers are a relevant part of the social network supporting people with intellectual disability (ID) in the independent use of public transport as their support can increase self-determination and social inclusion. This study used a standardized questionnaire to assess with a representative sample of 139 local bus drivers to assess their experiences with, knowledge of and attitudes toward people with learning disabilities. The survey was conducted in a town in Germany with rural surroundings as part of the Nordhorn Public Transportation Intervention Study. In survey 19% of the bus drivers had experiences with people with ID in their private lives. Knowledge about ID was rather moderate, differing widely according to specific items. Some drivers saw people with disabilities as passengers who are difficult and who needed more attention. Authors concluded that bus drivers are an essential part of the social support system of persons with ID and that assessment of bus drivers' attitudes, experiences, and knowledge is necessary to develop specific training programs. Valid information, communication, and social interaction skills training should be integrated in the regular training of bus drivers. Assessment and training of bus drivers could enhance the chances of persons with ID significantly to be mobile citizens in an inclusive society. (Edited publisher abstract)

Journal article

Decision-making after prenatal diagnosis of a syndrome predisposing to intellectual disability: what prospective parents need to know and the importance of non-medical information

Author:
HUYARD Caroline
Journal article citation:
Journal of Intellectual and Developmental Disability, 37(4), December 2012, pp.315-323.
Publisher:
Informa Healthcare

A study conducted in France, Belgium and Germany investigated what type of information prospective parents need for decision-making about continuing or terminating a pregnancy in the case of a condition predisposing to intellectual disability. 33 parents whose young or adult children had an intellectual disability were recruited through self-help groups, and took part in semi-structured interviews covering discovery of the syndrome, parenting practices, moral feelings regarding the child's behaviour, and personal dimensions of the experience of having such a child. Data analysis focusing on decision-making highlighted the importance of 3 types of information: the foetus as a future child and individual person, the couple as future parents, and the social environment of the future child and his or her parents and its capacity to support them. The article discusses these categories of information in relation to the decisions the interviewees retrospectively considered they would have made had they known about their child's syndrome at a prenatal stage. It includes quotations from participants. The authors conclude that their findings demonstrate that prospective parents' essential information needs are not limited to medical information.

Book

Issues in human rights protection of intellectually disabled persons

Author:
DIMPOULOS Andreas
Publisher:
Ashgate
Publication year:
2010
Pagination:
264p.
Place of publication:
Farnham

In this book the author examines the potential impact of the United Nations Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities on issues of intellectual disability and human rights protection, and argues that intellectual disability poses a distinct set of human rights challenges when compared with other types of disability. Noting that human rights within liberalism are linked to autonomous choice, the book aims to present "a theory as to how persons with intellectual disability can be allowed to flourish in a liberal setting through the exercise of their human rights, even though they may be perceived as non-autonomous". It looks at the European Convention on Human Rights and case law of the European Court of Human Rights, and includes a comparative analysis of the position of people with intellectual disability in English and German law.

Book

Sheltered employment in five member states of the Council of Europe: Austria, Finland, Norway, Sweden and Switzerland

Authors:
SAMOY Erik, WATERPLAS Lina
Publisher:
Council of Europe
Publication year:
1997
Pagination:
67p.,bibliogs.
Place of publication:
Strasbourg

Comparative study looking at the situation of sheltered employment in the twelve Member States of the European Union. The data for each country is grouped under the following headings: institutional context; target population; access to sheltered employment; characteristics of the people in sheltered employment; and a discussion of the topics currently under debate around sheltered employment in each country.

Journal article Full text available online for free

Focus on Europe: further education needed for people with mental handicap

Author:
SLUCKIN Alice
Journal article citation:
Practice: Social Work in Action, 1(1), 1987, pp.63-70.
Publisher:
Taylor and Francis

Reports on some of the changes that have taken in four European countries and a comparison is made with some aspects of current British practice. It is now know that, given the right methods, even severely mentally handicapped people can be taught quite complex skills. Hence they should have access to further education, which has in the past been denied to them.

Journal article

Mobility and public transport use abilities of children and young adults with intellectual disabilities: results from the 3-year Nordhorn public transportation intervention study

Authors:
HAVEMAN Meindert, et al
Journal article citation:
Journal of Policy and Practice in Intellectual Disabilities, 10(4), 2014, pp.289-299.
Publisher:
Wiley-Blackwell

The Nordhorn Public Transportation Intervention Study project in Germany had the aim of increasing the independent use of public transportation by students with intellectual disabilities (ID) through interventions in the social and physical environment. Success of the project was measured by the number of students who were able to independently go from home to school at the end compared with the start of the project and by the skills students evidenced with coping with barriers on their way to school at the end of the project compared with their baseline skills. This multicenter study included various types of interventions: assessment of mobility/traffic competency, mobility integrated individual educational plans, mobility and traffic curriculum, information for teachers and parents, training for bus drivers, real-life traffic training, support by mobility trainers and trip coaches, adaptations to streets and buses, and incident management including the use of communication devices (e.g., mobile phones with Global Positioning System). At the start of the project, less than 1% of the 124 students with ID used public transport to get to school, 3 years later, the proportion increased to 65.3%. On 19 of 29 items, students showed relevant and statistically significant improvement of skills in public transport use and traffic wayfinding behavior compared with the situation at baseline. (Edited publisher abstract)

Journal article

Assessing mobility competences of children with intellectual disabilities: development and results of the mobility assessment schedule

Authors:
KVAS Štefan, et al
Journal article citation:
Journal of Policy and Practice in Intellectual Disabilities, 10(4), 2014, pp.300-306.
Publisher:
Wiley-Blackwell

This article describes the aims, development, and testing of the Mobility Assessment Schedule (MAS), an instrument assessing the ability of students with intellectual disability (ID), to function effectively as pedestrians in normal traffic. The MAS provides information about individual mobility skills of school-age children with ID and measures the child's traffic skills congruent with safely and independently functioning in traffic situations. Mobility skills are measured in eight areas: visual perception, auditory perception, reaction, memory, attention, motor skills, social skills, and communication. The MAS was tested with 128 students at one school for children with ID in Germany. The internal consistencies of the scale and subscales were reasonable to good. Baseline results showed that the students already possessed, even before mobility training, many skills that are necessary for participation in traffic situations. The MAS is applicable and valid to assess traffic functioning skills of children with ID and can be an important tool for mobility training because it delivers information on various skills, which are necessary to function independently in traffic situations. This inventory can be part of the school's individual educational plans. (Publisher abstract)

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